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NGEO, "The First Jesus"

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  • Bob Schacht
    National Geographic is running a show this week called The First Jesus http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/expedition-week/4290/Overview#tab-facts
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 20, 2009
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      National Geographic is running a show this week called "The First Jesus"
      http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/expedition-week/4290/Overview#tab-facts
      Based on the "Jeselsohn Stone"

      >Jeselsohn Stone, is three feet tall with 87 lines of Hebrew. It was
      >found on the antiquities market a decade ago but not seriously
      >studied by scholars until recently.
      >
      >Read more:
      ><http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/expedition-week/4290/Overview#tab-facts#ixzz0XT7Bl2Pt>http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/expedition-week/4290/Overview#tab-facts#ixzz0XT7Bl2Pt

      The basic story is given as follows:

      >He called himself the King of the Jews, likely considered to be a
      >Messiah. Just around Passover, the Romans killed him and crucified
      >many of his followers outside Jerusalem. But his name was not
      >Jesus, it was Simon, a self-proclaimed Messiah who died four years
      >before Christ was born. Now, new analysis of a three-foot-tall stone
      >tablet from the first century B.C., being hailed by scholars as a
      >"Dead Sea Scroll on stone," may speak of an early Messiah and his
      >resurrection. Was Simon of Peraea real? Did his life serve as the
      >prototype of a Messiah for Jesus and his followers?
      >
      >Read more:
      ><http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/expedition-week/4290/Overview#tab-facts#ixzz0XT7hKSNz>http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/expedition-week/4290/Overview#tab-facts#ixzz0XT7hKSNz

      Strangely enough, the writing on the stone is in *ink*.
      >The stone is controversial because it could speak of a Messiah who
      >will rise from the dead after three days, based on line 80, which
      >leading Messianic scholar Dr. Israel Knohl has read as "by three days live."
      >
      >Read more:
      ><http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/expedition-week/4290/Overview#tab-facts#ixzz0XT85b6SP>http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/expedition-week/4290/Overview#tab-facts#ixzz0XT85b6SP



      >ABOUT SIMON OF PERAEA:
      > * A former Jewish slave, Simon of Peraea crowned himself king,
      > claiming to be the redeemer of Israel, the Messiah.
      > * He led a failed rebellion against Rome in 4 B.C. before
      > Passover and set fire to one of King Herod's palaces at Jericho and
      > several other royal residences.
      > * Soon after the rebellion, Simon was captured in a remote
      > canyon and killed or chopped in the neck; his corpse was left to
      > rot amidst the rocks. For Jews of the time of Simon of Peraea, not
      > burying a corpse was the ultimate humiliation.
      > * In the wake of his death, many of his followers were crucified.
      > * Dr. Knohl believes that Jesus knew the story of Simon's death
      > and from it had learned that a Messiah must die to fulfill his destiny.
      > * Accounts by the ancient Jewish historian Flavius Josephus may
      > be the only literary evidence from the time that either Jesus or
      > Simon of Peraea existed.
      >Read more:
      ><http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/expedition-week/4290/Overview#tab-facts#ixzz0XT8SDZ7A>http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/expedition-week/4290/Overview#tab-facts#ixzz0XT8SDZ7A


      I hadn't heard much about this before. Is this just NGEO
      hyperventilating, or is there any useful information in this?

      Bob Schacht
      Northern Arizona University


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • E Bruce Brooks
      To: Crosstalk In Response To: Bob Schacht On: The First Jesus From: Bruce Those whose interest has been piqued by a possible parallel between Jesus and a
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 20, 2009
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        To: Crosstalk
        In Response To: Bob Schacht
        On: The First Jesus
        From: Bruce

        Those whose interest has been piqued by a possible parallel between Jesus and a
        previous slave Messiah may like to look into Winsome Munro's last work, which
        intends to establish the possibility that Jesus himself was a slave.

        Winsome Munro, Jesus Born of a Slave: The Social and Economic Origins of
        Jesus's Message. Edwin Mellen 1998. The final editing was carried out by
        Munro's St Olaf College colleague Bill Poehlmann, following Munro's death in
        June 1994.

        That Munro herself came from South Africa, and was an active opponent of that
        regime, may perhaps color (or one might say, inspire) her conclusions.

        And no, Munro does not (at least not in the posthumously compiled index to her
        book) mention Simon of Peraea.

        Bruce

        E Bruce Brooks
        Warring States Project
        University of Massachusetts at Amherst
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