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more misinformation published about Qumran

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  • goranson@duke.edu
    An October 21 article in The Jewish Week* provides some reporting occasioned by an exhibit in New York, but unfortunately includes misinformation. A selection
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 21, 2008
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      An October 21 article in The Jewish Week* provides some reporting occasioned by
      an exhibit in New York, but unfortunately includes misinformation. A selection
      of its mistakes (skipping those on Sadducees, mikvaot, majority, etc.):

      One of its errors is repeated from recent Wall Street Journal and the New York
      Times articles; at least the latter printed a correction. The hair net in the
      exhibit is *not* from Qumran, but from a another place entirely. The absence of
      hairnets at Qumran has already been discussed in the literature by Joan Taylor
      and Jodi Magness.

      For some reason, Norman Golb--not known as a physical anthropologist (nor is his
      many-named online sockpuppet)--is quoted as averring that Qumran skeletal
      remains seem, in his imagination, to "suggest war injuries." The article might
      lead one to believe that Norman Golb was the first to raise questions about
      Qumran, as if Zeitlin, Driver, Roth, del Medico, Bar-Adon, Rengstorf and many
      others had not published before him--and before 1948, for that matter. (By the
      way, F. de Saulcy [1850-1851 visit] evidently thought the Arabic place name
      started with an ayin.)

      The article quotes Magen and Peleg on Qumran without being alive to the fact
      that their proposal has received in scholarly venues extraordinarily negative
      reviews.

      The article quotes Jean-Baptiste Humbert as follows: "Everyone inside the Ecole
      Biblique, we separate from the Father de Vaux interpretation....The Dead Sea
      Scrolls could not have been the library of the people of Qumran." To this claim
      I respond with two words: Emile Puech.


      Stephen Goranson
      http://www.duke.edu/~goranson

      *
      http://www.thejewishweek.com/viewArticle/c347_a13745/The_Arts/Museums.html
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