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Re: [XTalk] Luke and the diminutive forms "Priscilla" and "Sopater"

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  • Jack Kilmon
    ... From: Richard Fellows To: Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 2:20 AM Subject: [XTalk] Luke and the
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 29 10:42 AM
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Richard Fellows" <rfellows@...>
      To: <crosstalk2@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 2:20 AM
      Subject: [XTalk] Luke and the diminutive forms "Priscilla" and "Sopater"


      > It is often observed that Acts refers to Prisca using the familiar form,
      > "Priscilla". In a very recent article (NTS 54 pp479-495) William O. Walker
      > tries to explain this by suggesting that Luke uses the diminutive form of
      > Prisca to belittle her.

      The Roman family Priscus was an ancient family of the Servilius gens and the
      Prisci filled the highest offices in the Republic. Prisca was the formal
      feminine of Priscus. Priscilla was the feminine diminutive and would be
      used by family and close friends. In the same manner Domitilla was the
      feminine diminutive of the formal Domitius family and Drusilla of the Drusus
      family. Prisca was the opposite of belittling. It was a recognition of her
      status as a Roman citizen of high rank and ancient lineage.

      Jack


      Jack Kilmon
      San Antonio, TX
    • RSBrenchley@aol.com
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 30 4:19 AM
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        <<Can anyone think of any ancient or modern case where someone, who is
        referred to by a standard name by his/her contemporaries, is referred to by a
        diminutive name form by later non-contemporary writers?

        Richard Fellows
        Vancouver>>


        I don't have a copy of Graves' 'I, Claudius', and I'm not sure whether this
        originates with him, but in the series, Agrippina the Elder is called
        'Agrippina', while Agrippina the Younger, Nero's mother, is called 'Agrippinilla'.

        Regards,

        Robert Brenchley

        Birmingham UK








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