Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

A Crash Course in Jesus Studies

Expand Messages
  • Bob Schacht
    The following article originally appeared on Belief.net http://blog.beliefnet.com/godspolitics/2008/07/a-crash-course-in-jesus-histor.html and was then
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      The following article originally appeared on Belief.net
      http://blog.beliefnet.com/godspolitics/2008/07/a-crash-course-in-jesus-histor.html
      and was then excerpted below for circulation to the Sojourner's email list.

      I forward it as information about how historical Jesus studies are being
      perceived by a wider public.

      Bob Schacht
      University of Hawaii

      >A Crash Course in Jesus Studies
      >by Phyllis Tickle
      >
      >
      >A Sunday or two ago, I made mention of -- more to the truth, wrote a whole
      ><http://blog.beliefnet.com/cgi-bin/mt/mt-search.cgi?tag=Summer%20Sundays&blog_id=37>"Summer
      >Sundays" entry more or less about -- the
      ><http://blog.beliefnet.com/godspolitics/2008/06/pagans-and-patriarchs-by-phyll.html>canonical
      >Jesus, thereby raising a small bevy of questions and responses and polite
      >"say-what's?" I could not be more delighted. But delighted or not, I also
      >feel some obligation to make my case.
      >
      >All of us who were reared in modernity and/or in the afterwash of its ways
      >of conceptualizing, have known the impact of modernism. In few areas of
      >life has that impact been more keenly felt by Christians than in
      >discussions of "Jesus Studies" or, as it is sometimes more popularly
      >known, of "the quest for the historical Jesus." That is to say that many
      >of the intellectual tools and much of the sophisticated technology of
      >modernity, in addition to its conceptual principles, a lot of brilliant
      >thinking, and a world's worth of patient research, have been brought to
      >bear over the last century or so on the study of just who Jesus of
      >Nazareth was.
      >
      >The bulk of the questions have focused upon what he supposedly did and/or
      >did not say and upon whether or not he was or was not accurately portrayed
      >by those who became the church. Those questions have assumed from the
      >start that the Jesus of the canonical gospels might well be a man-made or
      >human-shaped figure different from the actual or historical creature who
      >at one time lived among us. Working from that assumption, it should be no
      >surprise that the Jesus who has emerged from all of this professional
      >scholarship and lay furor is as multiform and various as the scholars and
      >concerned laity who have engaged the quest. The end result, in fact, of
      >our dozen or so decades of scratching through history is such a
      >multiplicity of Jesuses that one has to say, "Whoa! Let's just hold up
      >here a minute and think this thing through a bit more clearly."
      >
      >Story, perhaps, is better than intellectual argument in this kind of
      >process. Accordingly, I wrote a small story some months ago ....
      >
      ><http://blog.beliefnet.com/godspolitics/2008/07/a-crash-course-in-jesus-histor.html>+Click
      >here to read the full post
      >
      >Phyllis Tickle (<http://www.phyllistickle.com/>www.phyllistickle.com) is
      >the founding editor of the religion department of Publishers Weekly and
      >author of <http://www.powells.com/partner/29218/biblio/0787987425>The
      >Words of Jesus: A Gospel of the Sayings of Our Lord and the forthcoming
      >fall release, <http://www.powells.com/partner/29218/biblio/0801013135>The
      >Great Emergence: How Christianity Is Changing and
      >Why<http://www.powells.com/partner/29218/biblio/0801013135>.
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.