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Re: More statistical analysis of the Talpiot Tomb

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  • Darrell Bock
    I gave this new report a quick read this morning. There are two significant things to note. The first is not so significant, other than to make an effort to
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 8, 2007
      I gave this new report a quick read this morning. There are two
      significant things to note.

      The first is not so significant, other than to make an effort to
      discredit Amos Kloner, who has been quite critical of the claims. The
      authors of the new report critique a quote where Kloner makes an
      observation that Jesus, Mary and Joseph did not live in Jerusalem and
      so would not have a family tomb there. They twist this citation by
      appeal to all of Jesus' family, not just Mary, Joseph, and Jesus and
      including the time after Jesus' execution. Kloner's point was that AT
      THE TIME OF JESUS' execution, they did not live in Jerusalem and so
      would not have had a family tomb there to bury Jesus in if they had
      been able to procure the body AND move it from the tomb of Joseph of
      Arimathea. This move should send a signal that this piece is not
      quite so neutral.

      A second, and by far more important, element in the paper is the
      decision to separate the name Yose[h] (a variant of Joseph) from the
      frequency of the name Joseph in the stats (an approach that differs
      from how Richard Bauckham handles the data). This makes the name rare
      and inflates the numbers (although I am not a statistician and do not
      know exactly how much this influences the numbers). The problem here
      is that this variant is directly related to the fact that two Josephs
      in the same family would cause the second to be given an alternative
      name. In other words, two Josephs in a family would yield a nickname
      in the family to distinguish them, which means we have in effect two
      Josephs in the list. To not count it as such skews the numbers given
      that Joseph is such a common name. So the new report has issues.




      Darrell Bock

      Dallas Theological Seminary







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