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  • Jeff Peterson
    Listers: Please accept my apologies for the message reproduced below; I was cleaning out my Drafts box and inadvertently sent a message I started composing
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 6, 2006
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      Listers:

      Please accept my apologies for the message reproduced below; I was
      cleaning out my "Drafts" box and inadvertently sent a message I
      started composing but never finished. Sorry for the inconvenience.

      Jeff Peterson


      On Aug 5, 2006, at 7:55 PM, Jeff Peterson wrote:

      > The lexical information on the ancient use of XXX is fascinating, but
      > I think that by focusing on it we are moving off Mark's original
      > question (or at least what I took that question to be). The question
      > is why modern scholars of ancient Christianity and Judaism typically
      > use "Palestinian" as the adjective to describe people, events, and
      > institutions in eretz Yisrael rather than "Judean" or the like. I'm
      > guessing that the use of XXX in antiquity is only one small tributary
      > in this stream.
      >
      > Jeff Peterson
      > Austin Graduate School of Theology
      > Austin, Texas
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jack Kilmon
      ... From: Jeff Peterson To: Sent: Saturday, August 05, 2006 7:55 PM Subject: Re: [XTalk] Re: Palestine
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 6, 2006
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Jeff Peterson" <peterson@...>
        To: <crosstalk2@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, August 05, 2006 7:55 PM
        Subject: Re: [XTalk] Re: Palestine and Josephus


        > The lexical information on the ancient use of XXX is fascinating, but
        > I think that by focusing on it we are moving off Mark's original
        > question (or at least what I took that question to be). The question
        > is why modern scholars of ancient Christianity and Judaism typically
        > use "Palestinian" as the adjective to describe people, events, and
        > institutions in eretz Yisrael rather than "Judean" or the like. I'm
        > guessing that the use of XXX in antiquity is only one small tributary
        > in this stream.
        >
        > Jeff Peterson
        > Austin Graduate School of Theology
        > Austin, Texas


        I typically use "Palestinian" or "ancient Palestine" in much the same
        anachronistic manner that we say "ancient America" or "prehistoric Britain."
        Modern eretz Yisrael does not include the entire region nor does ancient
        Israel or Judah or Judea. "Palestine" encompasses the entire region without
        having to dance around the Galilee, Samaria, Judah, Israel, Judea, Perea,
        etc. In short, it works geographically.

        Jack Kilmon
        San Marcos, Texas
      • Bob Schacht
        ... Jeff s inadvertent question and Jack s response should be placed in the context of a thread on this subject on this list from April 20 to 24. Palestine
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 6, 2006
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          At 04:39 AM 8/6/2006, Jack Kilmon wrote:


          >----- Original Message -----
          >From: "Jeff Peterson"
          ><<mailto:peterson%40austingrad.edu>peterson@...>
          >To: <<mailto:crosstalk2%40yahoogroups.com>crosstalk2@yahoogroups.com>
          >Sent: Saturday, August 05, 2006 7:55 PM
          >Subject: Re: [XTalk] Re: Palestine and Josephus
          >
          > > The lexical information on the ancient use of XXX is fascinating, but
          > > I think that by focusing on it we are moving off Mark's original
          > > question (or at least what I took that question to be). The question
          > > is why modern scholars of ancient Christianity and Judaism typically
          > > use "Palestinian" as the adjective to describe people, events, and
          > > institutions in eretz Yisrael rather than "Judean" or the like. I'm
          > > guessing that the use of XXX in antiquity is only one small tributary
          > > in this stream.
          > >
          > > Jeff Peterson
          > > Austin Graduate School of Theology
          > > Austin, Texas
          >
          >I typically use "Palestinian" or "ancient Palestine" in much the same
          >anachronistic manner that we say "ancient America" or "prehistoric Britain."
          >Modern eretz Yisrael does not include the entire region nor does ancient
          >Israel or Judah or Judea. "Palestine" encompasses the entire region without
          >having to dance around the Galilee, Samaria, Judah, Israel, Judea, Perea,
          >etc. In short, it works geographically.
          >
          >Jack Kilmon
          >San Marcos, Texas


          Jeff's inadvertent question and Jack's response should be placed in the
          context of a thread on this subject on this list from April 20 to 24.
          "Palestine" was an intentionally tendentious term introduced by the Romans,
          which etymologically was derived from a reference to Philistine territory.
          It is NOT a neutral geographical term because of its history. Please
          consult the archives for details.

          Bob


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jack Kilmon
          ... From: Bob Schacht To: Sent: Sunday, August 06, 2006 12:21 PM Subject: Re: [XTalk] Re: Palestine and
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 6, 2006
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Bob Schacht" <r_schacht@...>
            To: <crosstalk2@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, August 06, 2006 12:21 PM
            Subject: Re: [XTalk] Re: Palestine and Josephus


            > At 04:39 AM 8/6/2006, Jack Kilmon wrote:
            >
            >
            >>----- Original Message -----
            >>From: "Jeff Peterson"
            >><<mailto:peterson%40austingrad.edu>peterson@...>
            >>To: <<mailto:crosstalk2%40yahoogroups.com>crosstalk2@yahoogroups.com>
            >>Sent: Saturday, August 05, 2006 7:55 PM
            >>Subject: Re: [XTalk] Re: Palestine and Josephus
            >>
            >> > The lexical information on the ancient use of XXX is fascinating, but
            >> > I think that by focusing on it we are moving off Mark's original
            >> > question (or at least what I took that question to be). The question
            >> > is why modern scholars of ancient Christianity and Judaism typically
            >> > use "Palestinian" as the adjective to describe people, events, and
            >> > institutions in eretz Yisrael rather than "Judean" or the like. I'm
            >> > guessing that the use of XXX in antiquity is only one small tributary
            >> > in this stream.
            >> >
            >> > Jeff Peterson
            >> > Austin Graduate School of Theology
            >> > Austin, Texas
            >>
            >>I typically use "Palestinian" or "ancient Palestine" in much the same
            >>anachronistic manner that we say "ancient America" or "prehistoric
            >>Britain."
            >>Modern eretz Yisrael does not include the entire region nor does ancient
            >>Israel or Judah or Judea. "Palestine" encompasses the entire region
            >>without
            >>having to dance around the Galilee, Samaria, Judah, Israel, Judea, Perea,
            >>etc. In short, it works geographically.
            >>
            >>Jack Kilmon
            >>San Marcos, Texas
            >
            >
            > Jeff's inadvertent question and Jack's response should be placed in the
            > context of a thread on this subject on this list from April 20 to 24.
            > "Palestine" was an intentionally tendentious term introduced by the
            > Romans,
            > which etymologically was derived from a reference to Philistine territory.
            > It is NOT a neutral geographical term because of its history. Please
            > consult the archives for details.
            >
            > Bob


            Yes, that's true, Bob, but usage and meanings change over time. "Christian"
            was also an intentionally tendentious term. ANE is too broad for a neutral
            term, Israel too narrow. I guess I'll have to scroll back and see how it
            was resolved.

            Jack Kilmon
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