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Dimensions of belief about miraculous healing

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  • Bob Schacht
    FYI. I find it interesting that they used Anglicans in this study. Now, I happen to know that many Anglicans do believe in the power of prayer and miraculous
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 1, 2005
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      FYI. I find it interesting that they used Anglicans in this study. Now, I
      happen to know that many Anglicans do believe in the power of prayer and
      miraculous healing, but this is not widely known <g>.
      Bob

      >Mental Health, Religion & Culture
      > Publisher: Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group
      > Issue: Volume 8, Number 2 / June 2005
      > Pages: 97 - 107
      > DOI: 10.1080/1367467042000240374
      >
      >Dimensions of belief about miraculous healing
      >
      >Andrew Village
      >
      >A1 Trinity College Bristol UK
      >
      >Abstract:
      >
      >Belief in divine intervention in illness or healing is related to
      >religious belief in general (Furnham, A. (1994). Explaining health and
      >illness: Lay beliefs on the nature of health.Personality and Individual
      >Differences, 17, 455-466; Mansfield, C. J., Mitchell, J., & King, D. E.
      >(2002). The doctor as God's mechanic? Beliefs in the Southeastern United
      >States. Social Science and Medicine, 54, 399-409; Mitchell, J., &
      >Weatherly, D. (2000). Beyond church attendance: Religiosity and mental
      >health among rural older adults. Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology,
      >15, 37-54). There has been little investigation of the nature of such
      >belief among committed churchgoers and, in particular, whether or not
      >belief in miraculous healing is a single or multi-dimensional construct.
      >Scales measuring beliefs about miraculous healing were developed using a
      >sample of 404 Anglicans drawn from a variety of traditions within the
      >Church of England. Participants were asked to respond to various
      >hypothetical scenarios such as a claim that prayer healed cancer, a claim
      >of healing by Spiritualists and a failure to cure someone who had been
      >prayed with for healing. Item scores were subject to an exploratory factor
      >analysis to determine if belief about miraculous healing was multi- or
      >uni-dimensional. Belief in miraculous healing showed at least four
      >dimensions: (1) the possibility of such healing today; (2) the exclusivity
      >of Christian faith healing; (3) the sovereignty of God over illness; and
      >(4) the role of humans in the process. Scores on these dimensions were
      >positively correlated with each other and with measures of conservative
      >Christian belief. Beliefs about healing were strongly correlated with
      >charismatic practice and less strongly to age, education, church
      >attendance and church tradition. Beliefs about miraculous healing among
      >regular churchgoers were complex and varied considerably, even within a
      >single Christian denomination. Simple measures of religiosity and belief
      >do not always adequately describe Christian beliefs about divine
      >intervention in healing.
      >
      >The references of this article are secured to subscribers.


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    • John E Staton
      Bob et al, I don t know whether listmembers are generally aware that Trinity College students are probably more likely than not to believe in the power of
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 2, 2005
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        Bob et al,
        I don't know whether listmembers are generally aware that Trinity
        College students are probably more likely than not to believe in the
        power of prayer. The college is of the Evangelical tradition.

        Best Wishes
        JOHN E STATON
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