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Re: Origin of 'mite'

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  • RSBrenchley@aol.com
    In a message dated 24/07/04 19:36:01 GMT Daylight Time, crosstalk2@yahoogroups.com writes:
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 24, 2004
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      In a message dated 24/07/04 19:36:01 GMT Daylight Time,
      crosstalk2@yahoogroups.com writes:

      <<The "mite" was a prutah, in Greek a lepton. It was the lowest denomination
      coin and was minted by the Hasmonians, Herodians, Roman prefects and
      procurators. It was about the price of one pomegranate. You can view some
      of them that are in my collection of biblical coins at:
      http://www.historian.net/coins.htm

      Jack>>



      Lepton and prutah aren't normally considered as the same denomination
      though; a lepton was probably half a prutah. I think your Augustus is actually RIC
      vol I 493, the reverse being capricorn R, head L, bearing cornucopia, within
      laurel wreath. Minted in Pergamum, c27-26BC, R2 (ie rarer than the one you
      have it attributed as).

      Regards,

      Robert Brenchley


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • RSBrenchley@aol.com
      Thanks to everyone for the replies, which settle quite a bit of confusion. Regards, Robert Brenchley [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 24, 2004
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        Thanks to everyone for the replies, which settle quite a bit of confusion.

        Regards,

        Robert Brenchley


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Joseph Weaks
        ... This is what J. W. Betlyon says in his ABD article, that the mite was probably a Greek lepton, the smallest coin then in circulation. He also suggests
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 24, 2004
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          On Jul 24, 2004, at 6:37 PM, RSBrenchley@... wrote:
          > Lepton and prutah aren't normally considered as the same denomination
          > though; a lepton was probably half a prutah.

          This is what J. W. Betlyon says in his ABD article, that the mite "was
          probably a Greek lepton, the smallest coin then in circulation." He
          also suggests that it was "half a Roman quadrans or Jewish peruta."
          (pg. 1076, "Coins", J.W.Betlyon)

          Joe Weaks
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