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Re: [XTalk] Re: Story-telling

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  • Gordon Raynal
    ... Hi Jim, Most well said! If one starts with the parables and the associated aphorisms (that is aphorisms that dig into the ethical, communal, personal and
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 22, 2004
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      >--- In crosstalk2@yahoogroups.com, Bob Schacht <bobschacht@i...>
      >wrote:
      >> IMHO, story-telling is much more powerful than bon mots shorn of
      >any
      >> context. Story-telling is a branch of the Oral Tradition, which we
      >examined
      >> during the XTalk - sponsored Dunn seminar some time ago.
      >
      >Unless Jesus was a wisdom teacher in which case the short pithy
      >sayings would naturally have been later expanded.

      Hi Jim,

      Most well said! If one starts with the parables and the associated
      aphorisms (that is aphorisms that dig into the ethical, communal, personal
      and theological issues raised by the provacative parables) and one will
      consider the thematic connections in the written received heritage, then to
      use a music metaphor: "Jesus' base line" quickly inspires all kinds of
      symphonic overlays. To be sure this happened at table... one good story
      leading to another. Moving to the aftermath of Jesus, it surely happened in
      the proclamation and in this, in the processes of iconization (or call it
      mythmaking or my preferred expression- "the parabler becomes The Parable").
      But then I also want to uphold story-telling as a literary art (scroll,pen
      and papyrus art). Such as the earliest formulas like, "he died according to
      Scriptures..." surely involves more than just memory. The early
      "signs/wonders" collection that is common to all four canonical gospels
      shows signs of careful textual reflection and literary creativity. And down
      the line, Mark is masterful ***writing***. The Hebrew folks had been doing
      masterful creative writing for a l-o-n-g time before Jesus. That writing
      had been translated to Greek a long time before Jesus. Just by way of
      imagination, what a lovely find it would be if some archaelogist found an
      ampora with a piece of parchment from a Galilean house with Jesus' Good
      Samaritan on it and scribbled around it reference notes of checking out such
      as Leviticus 19:33-34, Psalm 59, Isaiah 2:2-4 and say, Jonah. This is a bit
      of dreaming as to finding any such actual shred of the creative writing
      processes, but when one looks to the fully blossomed examples of this like
      the obvious Matthean, "this" happened to fulfill "that Scripture," one is
      seeing more than just freeform oral creativity. To me it is best to think
      of the interplay between textuality, orality and literary creativity going
      on closely together always. And per your "pity post:)!" a truly wise saying
      is all one needs to get all of this rolling.

      Gordon Raynal
      Inman, SC
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