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[John_Lit] RE: Mel Gibson's "Passion" and Medieval motifs

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  • Bob Schacht
    ... (Apologies for cross-posting) This has been oft-mentioned in the published reviews, but seldom mentioned in our current threads on the movie. For a
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 2, 2004
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      At 05:41 PM 3/1/2004 -0600, Jeffrey B. Gibson wrote:
      >...It also stands behind the real source of Gibson's script -- Klemens
      >Bentano's edition of the Venerable Sister Anne
      >Catherine Emmerich--an eighteenth-century German stigmatist and
      >mystic--entitled Dolorous Passion (1833)...

      (Apologies for cross-posting)

      This has been oft-mentioned in the published reviews, but seldom mentioned
      in our current threads on the movie. For a discussion of the influence of
      the Emmerich Passion on Gibson, see
      http://www.beliefnet.com/story/140/story_14096_1.html

      For example, one detail due to Emmerich was pounding the nails all the way
      through the horizontal beam of the cross, so that the points protruded on
      the opposite side.

      Also, the appearance to Jesus of the devil in the Garden of Gethsemane was
      due to Emmerich. FWIW, that addition to the Gospel accounts is the best (in
      a literary sense) addition in the whole movie, in my opinion. But I refer
      to the idea, rather than to how it was implemented (about which I have no
      particular opinion).

      Some of the anti-semitism in the movie is due to Emmerich, e.g.:

      >Emmerich's visions of certain actions by Jews are not based in scripture.
      >For example, "The Dolorous Passion" describes "numerous devils among the
      >crowd, exciting and encouraging the Jews, whispering in their ears,
      >entering their mouths, inciting them still more against Jesus." In Mel
      >Gibson's movie, an androgynous devil moves through a Jewish mob as Jesus
      >is sentenced.

      This could have been done in an exculpatory way, that is, to convey the
      point that it was the devil, not the Jews, who was responsible for certain
      incitements.

      Emmerich's Dolores Passion is on the web, in full, at
      http://www.beliefnet.com/frameset_offsite.asp?pageLoc=http://www.emmerich1.com/DOLOROUS_PASSION_OF_OUR_LORD_JESUS_CHRIST.htm&query=&script=/story/140/story_14096_1.html

      (mind the wrap!)

      Bob

      Robert M. Schacht, Ph.D.
      Northern Arizona University
      Flagstaff, AZ

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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