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Codex Schoeyen

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  • Mike Grondin
    Recently, Terje Bergersen, a specialist in Gnostic studies, wrote to the GThomas list about MS 2650 in The Schoeyen Collection of the Norwegian Institute of
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 14, 2004
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      Recently, Terje Bergersen, a specialist in Gnostic studies, wrote to
      the GThomas list about MS 2650 in The Schoeyen Collection of the
      Norwegian Institute of Palaeography and Historical Philology. This
      ms is also designated 'mae2' and 'The Schoeyen Codex'. Does anybody
      know anything about this? Thanks - Mike Grondin.

      http://www.nb.no/baser/schoyen/4/4.1/413.html

      (the following is from the above site):

      Commentary: The text opens at ch. 5:38 and goes more or less
      continuously to the end.

      The present codex is the earliest Matthew in any Coptic dialect. The
      11 chapters, 6-9, 13-17, 22 and 28, and a great number of verses
      elsewhere, are in addition the earliest witnesses to these parts of
      the Bible. The text is unique, not following any Coptic nor Greek
      manuscripts known of Matthew.

      Prof. Dr. Hans-Martin Schenke in his editio princeps of the text, has
      named the manuscript Codex Schøyen, with the siglum Mae 2. (siglum
      Mae 1 being the Scheide Codex of 5th c.) His conclusions are that
      the text is not representing a free text transmission in relation to
      all the other extant Greek and Coptic manuscripts of Matthew, but
      that it is a correct translation of an entirely different Gospel of
      Matthew. There is only one other Gospel of Matthew known, the lost
      Hebrew Gospel of the Jewish Christians mentioned by the church
      fathers. This would have been the Hebrew exemplar of the Greek
      translation the present manuscript is based upon. Actually the
      famous statement by Papias that the Hebrew Gospel of Matthew was
      translated into Greek several times (Eusebius, hist. eccl.
      III, 39, 16), now come in a new light. Due to a series of textual
      differences between Codex Schøyen and the Canonical Gospel, it
      appears that both Gospels derive from different versions of the
      Hebrew Matthew. The consequence is that the relationship among the
      Synoptic Gospels has to be entirely re-evaluated, causing far-
      reaching and dramatic consequences for New Testament research.

      Published: Hans-Martin Schenke in the series Manuscripts in The
      Schøyen Collection, ed. Jens Braarvig; Coptic Papyri, vol. I. Oslo
      2001
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