Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Tribute payment

Expand Messages
  • RSBrenchley@aol.com
    ... Augustus and Tiberius issued numerous designs of denarius; Van Meter s Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins lists 38 types for Augustus, with a further six
    Message 1 of 35 , Feb 2, 2003
      > Admittedly this coin predated the time of the incident depicted in the
      > Gospels, and that at the time of the Gospel incident, the denarius of
      > Tiberius, rather than the denarius of Augustus was in circulation. But
      > didn't the existing denarius of Augustus continue to circulate? It is
      > interesting to speculate that the Augustan denarius would have been
      > particularly offensive to Jews because of the "Divi Filius". If that coin
      > was the one examined, then "Give to the emperor the things that are the
      > emperor's, and to God the things that are God's." would invoke another
      > layer of meaning.

      Augustus and Tiberius issued numerous designs of denarius; Van Meter's
      'Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins' lists 38 types for Augustus, with a
      further six issued for family members, and one for Augustus and Tiberius.
      Tiberius has two. Judging from the worn condition of many offered for sale,
      they, and the Republican and Imperatorial coins which preceded them, must
      have remained in circulation for many years. Is there any reason not to
      assume that any denarius would do? None of them was actually demonetised
      until long after.

      Regards,

      Robert Brenchley
      Birmingham, UK
    • mwgrondin <mwgrondin@comcast.net>
      ... It was evidently important to provide a justification for complying - perhaps because there were Jewish/Christian factions who argued that they shouldn t
      Message 35 of 35 , Feb 4, 2003
        --- RSBrenchley wrote:
        > Obviously, they were almost all paying the tax; significant
        > evasion would have brought about action by the Romans, of which
        > we have no record at this time. In practice, therefore, they did
        > not object, whatever private doubts they may have had.

        It was evidently important to provide a justification for complying
        - perhaps because there were Jewish/Christian factions who argued
        that they shouldn't comply. I perceive the tribute pericope as
        essentially providing a legal ruling on a real dispute between
        various factions - either within Judaism or within Christianity,
        or both. Whether it's based on an authentic scene from J's life,
        however, or whether the "Herodians" and "Pharisees" in the tale
        might be stand-ins for later Christian groups, seems not clearly
        decidable.

        > Isn't it possible, though, that an insignificant Messianic
        > group might have slipped through the net, and evaded the tax
        > on conscientious grounds?
        >
        > Could Revelation 13:16-17 be adduced as evidence of the avoidance
        > of image-bearing coin in the EC?

        That passage seems to indicate that everybody (presumably including
        Christians) _did_ use image-bearing coins - though maybe the author
        disapproved of what he saw as hypocrisy among his brethren.

        Mike Grondin
        Mt. Clemens, MI
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.