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Re: [XTalk] Re: Dating Paul

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  • Gordon Raynal
    Hi Don, ... Yes. I just don t know how much of those Acts travels have anything to do with history. And what I accept as from the historical Paul are
    Message 1 of 38 , Feb 1, 2003
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      Hi Don,
      >
      >Is part of your thinking about Paul that his impact was also
      >geographically limited, i.e. Greece/Asia Minor?

      Yes. I just don't know how much of those Acts travels have anything to do
      with history. And what I accept as from the historical Paul are Galatians,
      Philippians, Philemon, the Corinthian correspondence and Romans (with the
      understanding that all of these are redacted).
      >
      >Is it reasonable to speculate that the Gentile Christian church
      >outside of these areas (i.e. Egypt, Syria, Italy) developed a
      >more "moderate" approach to Judaism and worked more closely with
      >James and the Jerusalem church?

      I actually think part of the hardiness of this movement was that it
      attracted folks with a variety of takes on theo-ethical ideas... hence the
      vitality... hence the whopping good arguments... hence the various
      strategies for affirmation/ proclamation. What I'd like to know more about
      is the diversity out there in "the synagogues" across the world. Paul talks
      about "4 takes" in Corinth... how many of these folks were Jews?/ how many
      prostlytes?/ how many out and out Gentiles? And so... among the Jews... how
      many really got all that hot about strict kosher legalism? Would love to
      know these sorts of details. What I do note in the earliest strains of
      literature is the varying Hebrew Bible resources appealed to as
      foundational. For descriptive purposes only (yes, I know it's more complex
      than this!), but Q seems especially interested in "one like Elijah," James
      as reflected in 1-3 seems focused on Moses and the Torah as God's wisdom
      (see Deut. 4:5-8), early Thomas on Solomonic wisdom, and the Petrine strain
      in such as the Kenotic hymn in the midrash of "one like David" and hence
      such as the Suffering Servant materials. Paul, at center, was most at home
      in this latter central focus. Thus he and Peter might have had their
      differences about meal practices, but their basic affinities as to beginning
      foundations made them more alike than different.

      Gordon Raynal


      >Ignatius seems to be anti-Jewish (Christians or otherwise) as was
      >Marcion and they both came from Paul's apostolic stomping ground.
      >Coincidence? I think not...
      >
      >
      >Don Smith
      >Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    • mwgrondin <mwgrondin@comcast.net>
      (from the site you mentioned): Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied on Jews was 1/2
      Message 38 of 38 , Feb 8, 2003
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        (from the site you mentioned):
        "Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
        At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied on Jews
        was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were ... the
        only coins accepted by the temple."

        Richard-

        I'm confused. The Tyrean half-shekel contained an image of Melqarth,
        yet it was acceptable at the Temple? Practically speaking, it may
        have been the most stable non-Roman currency, but I was under the
        impression that the reason the Herodian coinage - as well the shekel
        minted 66-70 by Jewish revolutionaries - contained no human image,
        was a supposed ban on "graven images". What's the story? Money win
        out over principle, no such principle, or was the principle not so
        simplistic?

        Regards,
        Mike Grondin
        Mt. Clemens, MI
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