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Re: Marcion's Luke versus Canonical Luke

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  • Don Smith <donsmith@nucleus.com>
    Mike, You raise some good points, none of which, in my opinion, have anything to do with the reconstruction of Marcion s Gospel of Luke! If you have a more
    Message 1 of 38 , Jan 31, 2003
      Mike,

      You raise some good points, none of which, in my opinion, have
      anything to do with the reconstruction of Marcion's Gospel of Luke!

      If you have a more current online reference I'd be pleased if you
      could pass it along to me.

      Isn't Harnack's work on Marcion still the best available - and it's
      more than a century old...

      Don Smith
      Calgary, Alberta, Canada

      > > http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Ithaca/3827/wait1.htm
      >
      > I wonder about the reliability of this hundred-year-old work by one
      > Charles Waite. In addition to the likely improvement since his day
      > in the reconstruction of Marcion's gospel, Waite's analysis was
      > significantly effected by his belief that the chronological order
      > of the gospels was Matthew-Luke-Mark. This comes out in:
      >
      > http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Ithaca/3827/wait2.htm
    • mwgrondin <mwgrondin@comcast.net>
      (from the site you mentioned): Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied on Jews was 1/2
      Message 38 of 38 , Feb 8, 2003
        (from the site you mentioned):
        "Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
        At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied on Jews
        was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were ... the
        only coins accepted by the temple."

        Richard-

        I'm confused. The Tyrean half-shekel contained an image of Melqarth,
        yet it was acceptable at the Temple? Practically speaking, it may
        have been the most stable non-Roman currency, but I was under the
        impression that the reason the Herodian coinage - as well the shekel
        minted 66-70 by Jewish revolutionaries - contained no human image,
        was a supposed ban on "graven images". What's the story? Money win
        out over principle, no such principle, or was the principle not so
        simplistic?

        Regards,
        Mike Grondin
        Mt. Clemens, MI
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