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Dating Paul

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  • Don Smith <donsmith@nucleus.com>
    Based on extensive life-long research (the last couple of weeks, actually), I ve been having a few doubts about the dating of Paul s missionary activities and
    Message 1 of 38 , Jan 28, 2003
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      Based on extensive life-long research (the last couple of weeks,
      actually), I've been having a few doubts about the dating of Paul's
      missionary activities and letters. I know that the assembled brain
      trust will easily steer me to the truth on this matter. ;^)

      If concensus scholarly opinion dates the letters between 50 and 64, I
      presume that this is based on the references to meeting James and
      Peter, which is (somewhat inconsistently according to Bart Ehrman)
      supported by the story of Paul in Acts. Are there are any other solid
      dating markers for Paul's activities being pre-Temple destruction?

      Where I'm going with this is that IF Luke is written mid-2nd century
      in response to Marcion AND Luke is a redaction of Matthew for the
      emerging Gentile church of the time AND Acts is written by the same
      author as Luke THEN it would appear possible that the account of Paul
      in Acts is presented to show Paul working in close contact with the
      Jewish pillars of the Christian Church (Peter/James) as a blessing on
      his activities.

      I know this all sounds far-fetched, but it stems from my increasing
      suspicion that Luke is much later than Matthew. Dating Paul's
      activities to post-Jamnia persecution of Jewish Christians also makes
      some sense to me.

      Enlightenment requested.

      Lost and seeking,
      Don Smith
      Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    • mwgrondin <mwgrondin@comcast.net>
      (from the site you mentioned): Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied on Jews was 1/2
      Message 38 of 38 , Feb 8, 2003
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        (from the site you mentioned):
        "Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
        At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied on Jews
        was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were ... the
        only coins accepted by the temple."

        Richard-

        I'm confused. The Tyrean half-shekel contained an image of Melqarth,
        yet it was acceptable at the Temple? Practically speaking, it may
        have been the most stable non-Roman currency, but I was under the
        impression that the reason the Herodian coinage - as well the shekel
        minted 66-70 by Jewish revolutionaries - contained no human image,
        was a supposed ban on "graven images". What's the story? Money win
        out over principle, no such principle, or was the principle not so
        simplistic?

        Regards,
        Mike Grondin
        Mt. Clemens, MI
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