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RE: [XTalk] "A History of the Synoptic Problem"

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  • Mark Goodacre
    Sorry, I m a bit late on this one. I share many of the other views expressed on the list on Dungan s History; I had a review of this in the Scottish Journal
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 18, 2002
      Sorry, I'm a bit late on this one. I share many of the other views
      expressed on the list on Dungan's History; I had a review of this in
      the Scottish Journal of Theology earlier this year (_SJT_ 55
      (2002), pp. 373-7). Let me mention one thing that connects with one
      of Stephen Carlson's comments. Dungan does not give a precise
      definition of the Synoptic Problem and this rather skews the
      discussion. If I might take the liberty of quoting myself,

      > Moreover, at the risk of being oversimplistic, the term "Synoptic"
      > Problem is generated by the term "Synoptic" Gospels, and nowhere here
      > is there any discussion of that most basic issue, the distinction
      > between the Synoptics and John. The reader unfamiliar with the
      > Synoptic Problem would have no idea from reading this book that the
      > extensive, verbatim agreement between Matthew, Mark and Luke is not
      > shared with John. Rather, where Dungan does draw attention to any
      > difference, he suggests that it is a question purely of the
      > theological and historical judgements on the Fourth Gospel. Dungan
      > claims, for example, that "Huck's synopsis dispensed with most of the
      > Gospel of John" because "prevailing opinion held it to be totally
      > unhistorical" (p. 350; cf. p. 322). But Gospel Synopses (including
      > the pioneering attempt of Griesbach as well as those of contemporary
      > Griesbachians) do not necessarily "dispense" with John because of any
      > historical or theological judgement on it but only in so far as they
      > are Synopses of the Gospels, books that arrange the Gospels
      > synoptically, inevitably giving preference to those Gospels - Matthew,
      > Mark and Luke - to which the Synopsis thereby lends its name. (p. 375).

      Mark
      -----------------------------
      Dr Mark Goodacre mailto:M.S.Goodacre@...
      Dept of Theology tel: +44 121 414 7512
      University of Birmingham fax: +44 121 414 4381
      Birmingham B15 2TT UK

      http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/goodacre
      http://NTGateway.com
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