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Re: Proof

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  • mwgrondin
    ... Yes, haphazardly selected is much better wording. The reason I put my own phrase in scare-quotes is that I knew it wasn t quite right, but I couldn t
    Message 1 of 104 , Sep 2, 2002
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      --- Bob Schacht wrote:
      > ... I want to point to a problem with the phrase "objectively
      > selected," which post-modernists have taught us to distrust. The
      > situation Mike describes is more akin to "haphazardly selected;"
      > bias can be due to all kinds of things other than conscious intent.

      Yes, 'haphazardly selected' is much better wording. The reason I put
      my own phrase in scare-quotes is that I knew it wasn't quite right,
      but I couldn't think of a better one at the time. However, I note
      that you agree with Dave that new historical data (e.g., DSS and Nag
      Hammadi) is _not_ presented to us "randomly", and you assert
      categorically that "Haphazard is NOT the same as random!". Perhaps
      you can speak about the distinction between them, since I can't
      think of any substantial difference.

      > "H is probable" is not a useful construction. Any hypothesis is
      > "probable" in the sense of having a probability ranging between
      > 0 and 100.

      That's not what the word 'probable' means, Bob, and on reflection
      I think you'll realize that. 'Probable' means 'likely to be true'
      (i.e. probability > 50%), not just 'possibly true' (i.e.,
      probability > 0). The schematic form can be expressed as
      "Probably H" or "It's likely that H", if that helps.

      Mike
    • Thomas G. Barnes
      I know this is off topic, however, during the past few days I noticed the discussion going on about the use of copyrighhted material. Anyway, my question is
      Message 104 of 104 , Nov 13, 2002
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        I know this is off topic, however, during the past few days I noticed the
        discussion going on about the use of copyrighhted material. Anyway, my
        question is this, how do I properly cite a web page I used information from
        in an academic paper. I am a student and an interested historical Jesus
        individual. I realize this is off topic so please send reply to me off the
        list.

        Thomas G. Barnes
        Philadelphia, PA
        Temple University
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