Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Ancient and modern concepts of 'race'

Expand Messages
  • RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 14, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      << Still, to studiously avoid words like “race” and “ethnic” in reaction to
      the
      tragic events of the 20th century CE holocaust, is a lot like letting the
      tail wag the dog. >>

      I agree we're in danger of letting the tail of modern politics wag the
      dog of Biblical studies here if we avoid the terms, but there are also
      dangers in using them. These days our concept of 'race' is apparently
      irredeemably wrapped up in the nineteenth century myth of biological race,
      and its of course particularly influenced by skin colour. Surely nothing of
      this existed in Biblical times. Concepts of race and ehtnicity undoubtedly
      existed, however. Does anyone know of anything that's been published on
      these? It boils down to a question of how to distinguish between the modern
      and the ancient concepts, and secondarily - off-topic but of considerable
      interest to me personally - how the latter have influenced the former.

      Regards,

      Robert Brenchley
      RSBrenchley@...
      Birmingham UK
    • Matthew Estrada
      Just read McDonald s Mimesis and Intertextuality , along w/Thomas Brodie s chapter. The whole book is an excellent read. Would anyone know how to contact
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 14, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Just read McDonald's "Mimesis and Intertextuality",
        along w/Thomas Brodie's chapter. The whole book is an
        excellent read.

        Would anyone know how to contact Thomas L. Brodie,
        either by email, phone, or regular mail? If so, I
        would appreciate the information. Thank you.

        Matt Estrada email: matt_estrada@...


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs
        http://www.hotjobs.com
      • Bob Schacht
        ... Robert, A good way to get into all this is Shaye Cohen s book, *The Beginnings of Jewishness: Boundaries, Varieties, Uncertainties* for which there is an
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 16, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          At 02:14 PM 8/14/2002 -0400, RSBrenchley@... wrote:
          ><< Still, to studiously avoid words like “race” and “ethnic” in
          >reaction to
          >the
          > tragic events of the 20th century CE holocaust, is a lot like letting the
          > tail wag the dog. >>
          >
          > I agree we're in danger of letting the tail of modern politics wag the
          >dog of Biblical studies here if we avoid the terms, but there are also
          >dangers in using them. These days our concept of 'race' is apparently
          >irredeemably wrapped up in the nineteenth century myth of biological race,
          >and its of course particularly influenced by skin colour. Surely nothing of
          >this existed in Biblical times. Concepts of race and ehtnicity undoubtedly
          >existed, however. Does anyone know of anything that's been published on
          >these? It boils down to a question of how to distinguish between the modern
          >and the ancient concepts, and secondarily - off-topic but of considerable
          >interest to me personally - how the latter have influenced the former.
          >
          >Regards,
          >
          >Robert Brenchley

          Robert,
          A good way to get into all this is Shaye Cohen's book, *The Beginnings of
          Jewishness: Boundaries, Varieties, Uncertainties*
          for which there is an online review at
          http://www.bookreviews.org/Reviews/0520211413.html that makes good reading.
          The critical Greek terminology was how the word *ethnos* and other *ethnoi*
          were used and understood. Cohen examines this with respect to Ioudaios. The
          short answer is that mostly in the ancient world, "race" was mixed up with
          geography and other variables, and were rather different from modern
          American notions of race.

          For what its worth, as an anthropologist, it is clear to me that "races"
          are rooted not in biology but in social constructs. For the American
          Anthropological Association's discussion of the word, see
          http://www.aaanet.org/stmts/racepp.htm , a statement that I agree fully with.

          Bob
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.