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More Re: [XTalk] Violence

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  • laymantwo
    Well, I rather doubt that Josephus was suggesting that James actually broke any law. It seems to portray Ananus actions as being themselves unlawful.
    Message 1 of 104 , Aug 6, 2002
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      Well, I rather doubt that Josephus was suggesting that James actually
      broke any law. It seems to portray Ananus' actions as being
      themselves unlawful.

      However, if you are asking why I think Ananus had James and others
      killed, there are a number of possibilities.

      First, I have heard some suggest that Ananus was jeolous of James and
      James' success. I rather doubt this myself, as its only conjecture.

      Second, perhaps James' Christology was too high, leading Ananus to
      believe that James and the Jerusalem Church was engaging in blasphemy.
      Unfortunately, we do not have much direct evidence about the Jerusalem
      Church's Christology. Certainly Paul had a high Christology, and it
      does not appear to have been a point of dispute between he and Peter
      and James. However, even if the Jerusalem CHurch had a high
      Christology like Paul's, we do not know how publically they would have
      proclaimed it.

      Third, perhaps Ananus took action against James and the others because
      of their association with the Gentile mission. It was certainly
      enough to get Paul in trouble, even though the indications are that
      Paul followed the law carefully in Jerusalem.

      Fourth, perhaps Ananus was angered by the Jerusalem Church's teaching
      of the resurrection. As a Sadduccee, he would have very much
      disagreed with the Christian teaching of the resurrection. Moreover,
      the Jerusalem Church appears to have been publically proclaiming the
      resurrection of Jesus in Jerusalem. Claiming not only the existence
      of the resurrection, but claiming to have proof of it through the
      resurrection of Jesus might very well have provoked Ananus.

      Acts 4:2 provides indicrect support for this possibility. According
      to its author, Peter and John upset the Sanhedrin by preaching the
      resurrection. That they were proclaiming the resurrection of someone
      that the Sanhedrin likely had a hand in executing might have added
      further provocation

      "The preset and the captain of the temple gaurd and the Sadducees came
      up to Peter and John while they were speaking to hte people. They
      were greatly disturbed because the apostles were teaching the people
      and proclimaing in Jesus the resurrection of the dead."

      Additionally, to the extent the author of Acts is accurate in stating
      that many Pharisees joined them, this could also be seen as supporting
      this last point. It tends to show that the early church stressed the
      resurrection.

      Finally, it could have been a combination of the above, or some
      offense by James and the Jerusalem Church that simply escaped
      historical notice.

      C.E. Price
      Los Angeles, California



      --- In crosstalk2@y..., "Peter Kirby" <kirby@e...> wrote:

      >
      > What laws do you think were broken by James and certain others?
      >
      > thanks,
      > Peter Kirby
    • Thomas G. Barnes
      I know this is off topic, however, during the past few days I noticed the discussion going on about the use of copyrighhted material. Anyway, my question is
      Message 104 of 104 , Nov 13, 2002
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        I know this is off topic, however, during the past few days I noticed the
        discussion going on about the use of copyrighhted material. Anyway, my
        question is this, how do I properly cite a web page I used information from
        in an academic paper. I am a student and an interested historical Jesus
        individual. I realize this is off topic so please send reply to me off the
        list.

        Thomas G. Barnes
        Philadelphia, PA
        Temple University
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