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RE: [XTalk] Gerhardsson & Neusner

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  • Bob Schacht
    ... Oh, I don t know. Having all those irons in the fire could have assisted in the process of evading any critical review of his work by anyone in a position
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 15, 2002
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      At 03:48 PM 6/15/2002 -0400, David C. Hindley wrote:
      >Bob Schacht muses:
      >
      >...Keep in mind, though, that Smith had an A.B. (1936) from a
      >Christian sponsored school, and had earned an S.T.B. (I
      >don't know what that means, though) from Harvard Divinity
      >School in 1940. He then studied in Jerusalem under two
      >successive fellowships from 1940 to 1943, while at the same
      >time enrolled at Hebrew University until 1944. While he
      >earned his PhD from Hebrew University four years later in
      >1948, he had meanwhile returned to Harvard for postgraduate
      >work since 1944 or 1945. This is hardly an environment to be
      >called "self instruction."

      Oh, I don't know. Having all those irons in the fire could have assisted in
      the process of evading any critical review of his work by anyone in a
      position to do anything about it. Besides, Neusner was much closer to the
      situation than we are, so one wonders.


      > >>So Smith had a mentor in learning to be a "ferocious critic"?<<
      >
      >As did Neusner in Smith. <g>

      Yes, and one might hope that line of descent of ferocity ends there.


      > >>I prefer Popper's avowed method (which I am told was
      >honored mostly in the breach, unfortunately).<<
      >
      >Still, he managed to infuriate Wittgenstein to the point
      >where he almost whacked him with that fireplace poker. <g>

      We have not yet mentioned the other side of the coin: how the rapprochement
      came about between Gerhardsson & Neusner. According to the book, Neusner
      went to Gerhardsson's turf for a conference, and Gerhardsson provided
      hospitality to his erstwhile nemesis with such grace that Neusner began to
      re-examine his previous assessment of Gerhardsson's work. This book was
      apparently the fruit of that encounter.

      "Consider the source" is not always a reliable guide. But sometimes when
      other means are not available, or are equivocal, I have found it helpful.

      Bob


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