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Tacitus - the last word?

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  • Tom Simms
    ... From my Grandfather s 1878 Harper & Brothers LATIN Dictionary Expello, puli, pulsum... gvies a number of quotes representing drive out or away, thrust out
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 1, 1999
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      On Mon, 01 Mar 1999 07:06:34 +0100, mc2499@... writes:
      >
      >>Suetonius, of course, wrote in Latin, so the connotations provided
      >>by a dictionary of "Current English" is of questionable relevance.


      From my Grandfather's 1878 Harper & Brothers LATIN Dictionary

      Expello, puli, pulsum... gvies a number of quotes representing
      drive out or away, thrust out or away from the likes of Propertiue,
      Cicero, Ovid and finally Suetonius "Orientem statum expuulsus" meaning
      _forced, compelled_.

      How much more do you want...(babble,babble,babble)

      Ian, thanks for driving me to the source...

      Tom

      1
      >This of course is why I went from that dictionary (which was a means of
      >getting at the simple idea of what the generic significance of "expel" was)
      >to the etymology as to the words that have entered English from Latin to
      >indicate the significance of the stem morpheme, all the examples have
      >entered Italian with basically the same significances.
      >
      >>Looking at Lewis & Short's LATIN DICTIONARY under EXPELLO yields
      >>quite a few glosses without the notion of force (e.g. exiled,
      >>rejected, repudiated (of a wife in a divorce), etc.)
      >
      >Of these only "exile" has any relevance at all. One would of course like to
      >see how it pans out in Lewis and Short.
      >
      >>Therefore,
      >>it is probably reading too much into the text to require a use of
      >>force by Claudius
      >
      >I was arguing that potential force was sufficient, though Jeffrey Gibson's
      >post does throw new light on the matter.
      >
      >>that would tend to contradict Tertullian's
      >>characterization that Nero was the first to use the sword against
      >>Christianity. Few governments need to apply force every time an
      >>order is given; however, the implied threat is always present.
      >
      >As I was saying, potential force was sufficient.
      >
      >>It is also interesting to see Acts and Suetonius give many of the
      >>same details (Claudius' banishment of Jews from Rome), yet with
      >>differences of wording, suggesting independent attestation of the
      >>same event.
      >
      >There was no argument on this matter, Stephen.
      >
      >
      >Ian
      >
      >
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