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Re: Thoughts of GosThom

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  • Anne Quast
    ... Is #102 among those you consider to be inauthentic? JS made this black as it is considered to be one of Aesop s fables which was current at that time.
    Message 1 of 56 , Oct 2, 1998
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      At 20:57 1/10/98 -0400, Stevan Davies wrote:
      >
      >> From: Bob Schacht
      >
      >
      >> Well, now, these "inauthentic" sayings interest me (for the moment). I can
      >> understand inauthentic sayings as part of redactional material or editorial
      >> reworking, but if its just a collection of sayings, why should there be any
      >> inauthentic sayings? That is, if Thomas avoids editorial comment, why would
      >> he make up a saying (which is, after all, an editorial comment inserted
      >> into the mouth of a speaker.)
      >
      >Thomas avoids editorial comment and does not make things up.
      >[The inauthentic stuff is extraordinarily various and not such that
      >you could point to several things and say "these he made up."]
      >
      >> Or are you just saying that Thomas was a
      >> somewhat indiscriminate collector of sayings and
      >> things-somebody-said-that-were-attributed-to-Jesus, and
      >that Thomas didn't
      >> know the difference?
      >
      >Yes, that's it. In my imaginative reconstruction Judas Thomas
      >(or somebody) within a community on one occasion wrote down
      >what several people came up with as Jesus' sayings. Because
      >they are in a community they share certain points of view and
      >so there is a rather vague Thomas-point-of-view in Thomas. But
      >the intention is not to push the point of view per se but to get
      >sayings on parchment. People remember various things and
      >speak them aloud to the scribe who writes them down. The compiler
      >of the text had no or virtually no input. The variousness of the
      >inauthentic sayings has to do with various people remembering
      >different things. The "catchwords" result from e.g. a "light"
      >saying prompting in memory another "light" saying and so forth.
      >The clustering of the doublets in Thomas toward the end
      >indicates that the folks were running out of new sayings.
      >
      >Steve
      >
      Is #102 among those you consider to be inauthentic? JS made this black as
      it is considered to be one of Aesop's fables which was current at that
      time. Could not the saying have come from Jesus and then used by whoever
      put together the collection of Aesop's fables?
    • Michael T. MacDonell
      Dear Rene: I think it has a much simpler answer: Nobody cares what gender anybody is. Why should they? You pick the most likely, that s all. I cannot imagine
      Message 56 of 56 , Oct 22, 1998
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        Dear Rene:

        I think it has a much simpler answer: Nobody cares what gender anybody is.
        Why should they? You pick the most likely, that's all. I cannot imagine
        that the distinction, if known would alter any item in the ongoing
        conversation.

        Best Regards,
        Mike


        At 07:49 AM 10/22/98 -0700, you wrote:
        > This disembodied forum of cyberspace, where all is transmitted via
        >printed word, can lead to amusing curiosities such as myself
        >being referred to lately on Crosstalk as "she" and even most recently
        >"Renee" (contrary to the evidence!) when I am in fact quite happily
        >male... :) No apologies are in order by anyone except myself for not
        >putting "Mr." in front of the name.
        > It just goes to show how easy it is for all of us to go beyond the
        >documentary evidence!
        >
        > ------------------------
        >
        > I'll be posting more GTh-Synoptic parallel statistics in the next 24
        >hours...
        >
        >Regards,
        >
        >-Rene
        >
        >
        >Rene Salm
        >386 E. 29th Ave.
        >Eugene OR USA 97405
        >Tel: (541) 686-0296
        >e-mail: rsalm@...
        >
        ____________________________________
        Michael T. MacDonell, Ph.D.
        Doctoral Student in Biblical Studies
        Trinity College and Seminary
        ____________________________________
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