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Re: Thoughts of GosThom -Reply

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  • Stevan Davies
    ... There is a ton of information about Thomas on my website http://home.epix.net/~miser17/Thomas.html and particularly check out http://huizen.dds.nl/~skirl/
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 1, 1998
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      > Date: Thu, 01 Oct 1998 19:53:50 -0500
      > From: Jeff Lohr

      > Can anyone suggest reading materiel or send me a copy of a
      > bibliography regarding the history of the gospel of thomas and its use
      > within or not within the historical church. I am new to this sort of
      > research. I do not have much background in religous history but i am
      > trying.

      There is a ton of information about Thomas on my website

      http://home.epix.net/~miser17/Thomas.html

      and particularly check out

      http://huizen.dds.nl/~skirl/

      which gives a huge Thomas bibliography.

      As for its use in the historical church, there is very little
      evidence of that. Probably all the references to Thomas (and
      many of them to something else by the same name) could
      be typed on a single sheet of paper.

      Steve
    • joe baxter
      What has been left unsaid (during the course of this thread) are the differences of the communities that produced the 4 Gospels versus the community (or
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 6, 1998
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        What has been left unsaid (during the course of this thread) are the
        differences of the communities that produced the 4 Gospels versus the
        community (or communities) that produced Thomas. The 4G represent the
        community building needs of the early church, especially in the cities. GTh
        seems to come from the wildernesswhere such needs are minimal.Thus as Mark
        Goodacre commented some time ago, concerning a singular GTh reference to a
        crowd:

        >The term "the crowd" is unparalleled elsewhere in Thomas but it is
        >very common in Luke. We find ourselves asking in Thomas "What
        >crowd?" It is the first and the last that we hear of them. In Luke
        >"the crowd" are with us throughout, and no more so than in the
        >Central Section. "The crowd" are superfluous and irrelevant in
        >Thomas but coherent, important and pervasive in Luke.


        Randomness also works out just fine in the wilderness. Everything is
        primitive. Why should verse be any different?

        Would not Yeshu when he went into the wilderness have also taught? Is it any
        surprise that his teachings were suited to the lifesyles of the ascetics,
        who were his listeners?

        If the teachings were mostly given in the wilderness, and given the fact
        that they are suited to ascetics, that must be where its oral tradition was
        first preserved. In time someone, possibly Thomas, wrote it down.

        Ascetics are not ambitious. However deep and profound GTh may be, it
        remained undeveloped. Thus, it is like a stone in the raw. This also
        suggests that Yeshu only spent so much time as a teacher in the wilderness.
        That, after all, wasn't his business.

        This also provides some context to the issues. I have noticed in the
        discussions a loose association between the words "independent" and "early"
        on the one hand, and "dependent" and "late", on the other. These
        associations are not always appropriate. An independent wilderness Gospel
        could have existed in the oral tradition in a wilderness community for many
        years, without being reduced to writing. Ascetics, as I said, are not
        ambitious by nature. Given the independence of the wilderness community, it
        could have been reduced to writing after certain of the 4G, and still remain
        independent.

        In the same way, oral traditions may have been separated by distance and
        other factors. . The oral traditions in the cities may have been quite
        different from the oral traditions in the wilderness. The folks in the
        wilderness may have been skeptical of anything they heard that came from the
        cities. This again allows something to be independent, even though late.

        Kind regards,

        Joe Baxter
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