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Solving the Puzzle's 'Pieces' & more things the Cat dragged in

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  • 2nd Sight
    Solving the Puzzle s Pieces & more things the Cat dragged in Criminal Minds 19 September 2003 . ^..^
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 19, 2003
      Solving the Puzzle's 'Pieces' & more things the Cat
      dragged in

      Criminal Minds
      19 September 2003

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      2nd Sight Magazine Update

      Don't want to fill up your inbox? Articles in this
      newsletter, links, graphics, and more topics are posted
      online regularly at 2nd Sight Magazine. You can find it
      at:

      http://secondsightresearch.tripod.com/

      Criminal Minds Crime and Court News Page
      http://secondsightresearch.tripod.com/zine/id16.html

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      Contents:

      Pennsylvania State Trooper (humor)
      Arrests in 'Adam' Torso Case
      Judge Turns Case Over Against Mother Accused of Helping
      Cover Up Murder
      Jury Selection Tomorrow in Scarsdale Man's Murder Trial
      All In the Line of (Jury) Duty

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      Pennsylvania State Trooper (humor)

      A Pennsylvania State Trooper pulled a car over on I-81
      about 2 miles north of the PA/MD state line. When the
      Trooper asked the driver why he was speeding, the
      driver answered that he was a magician and a juggler
      and he was on his way to Harrisburg to do a show that
      night at the Zembo Shrine Circus and didn't want to be
      late.

      The Trooper told the driver he was fascinated by
      juggling, and if the driver would do a little juggling
      for him that he wouldn't give him a ticket.

      The driver told the Trooper that he had sent all of his
      equipment on ahead and didn't have anything to juggle.
      The Trooper told him that he had some flares in the
      trunk of his patrol car and asked if he could juggle
      them. The juggler stated that he could, so the Trooper
      got three flares, lit them, and handed them to the
      juggler.

      While the man was doing his juggling act, a car pulled
      in behind the patrol car, a drunk got out and watched
      the performance briefly, he then went over to the
      patrol car, opened the rear door and got in.
      The Trooper observed him doing this and went over to
      the patrol car, opened the door and asked the drunk
      what he thought he was doing.

      The drunk replied, "You might as well take my @ss to
      jail, cause there's no way in hell I can pass that
      test."
      --- from Sandi More Humor at Cat Tales:
      http://secondsightresearch.tripod.com/cattales/id3.html
      Crime and Justice Run Amok:
      http://secondsightresearch.tripod.com/zine/id74.html

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      Arrests in 'Adam' Torso Case
      Police are 'tantalizingly close' to breakthrough in
      Thames torso murder

      August 24, 2003 -- Detectives investigating the voodoo
      killing of "Adam", the boy whose decapitated and
      limbless torso was found floating in the Thames two
      years ago, believe that they are "tantalizingly close"
      to charging someone in connection with his murder. The
      victim, called 'Adam' by officers after he was found
      floating in the river near Tower Bridge in September
      2001, was between age four and six. Thirteen days
      later, a bundle of seven candles wrapped in a sheet
      with someone's name written on it is retrieved from the
      Thames.

      This lead goes nowhere for Commander Baker and
      Detective Inspector O'Reilly (the case's two leading
      officers) but it does result in them heading to Africa
      to further investigate ritual murder. Police suspect
      that he was a victim of ritual killing after being
      brought over from Nigeria. Detectives think Adam was
      aged between four and six, and was alive when he
      arrived in London.

      Officers with the Metropolitan Police serious crime
      group say that recent developments have left them
      hopeful they can bring a charge of conspiracy to murder
      against one of the people they say helped bring the boy
      into Britain. "We have almost got our fingers on this
      person," a senior detective said last week. "There is a
      lot of circumstantial evidence against this individual
      and we are almost in a position to issue charges."

      The development comes as The Telegraph today publishes
      the first pictures of Joyce Osagiede, the Nigerian
      woman police believe could hold the key to the murder
      of the boy, who was aged between four and seven when he
      was killed. In a potential blow to British detectives,
      however, Ms Osagiede has now disappeared from her
      family's one-story tin-roofed home in Benin City, where
      she had been living since her deportation as a bogus
      asylum seeker from Britain last November.

      Officers traveled to the African country after forensic
      tests showed he was from the area around Benin City.
      All of the people arrested in July were from the same
      part of Nigeria and police compared their DNA with
      Adam's to see if any are related to him. Painstaking
      forensic tests of Adam's bones, skin, and gut contents
      revealed he grew up somewhere in West Africa and his
      recent diet had included a 'ritual potion.' The
      'potion' consisted of animal bone, quartz, and clay
      with traces of gold, The dead boy, whose throat had
      been slit, had lived most of his life in or near Benin
      City in Nigeria and was brought to London shortly
      before his horrific death. Detectives believe he was
      killed in some sort of gruesome "black magic"
      ceremony -- called Muti -- and his torso dumped in the
      Thames.

      Police officers from Operation Maxim, the multi-agency
      unit tasked with targeting organized criminals who are
      in the UK illegally, arrested 21 people in raids across
      London in July. Nine addresses in east and southeast
      London were searched by nearly 200 Metropolitan Police
      officers, and ten men and eleven women were held by
      police. Most of those arrested were for immigration
      offences, identity fraud and passport forgery. A baby
      belonging to one of the women was also taken into care
      while the woman was being questioned.

      Detective Inspector Will O'Reilly, leading the Adam
      inquiry, said: "We've uncovered what we believe is a
      criminal network concentrating on people trafficking.
      Police also said there was evidence of other children
      having been at the raided addresses. "We are convinced
      that we are on to a group, or individuals, that were
      involved in trafficking Adam into the country,"
      O'Reilly said.

      They are also trying to trace the witch doctor who
      brewed a potion containing bone fragments which the boy
      swallowed before he died. The fragments have been
      submitted to New York's medical examiner who will use
      techniques developed to identify September 11 victims.

      "Interesting substances" found in the raids will also
      be compared with the potion found in Adam's intestines.
      Police think some of the items confiscated could be
      linked to rituals. Metropolitan Police Commander Andy
      Baker said: "Some of the items would raise a few
      eyebrows -- they look like some element of ritualism is
      involved." Among the items found was the skull of an
      animal which had a nail driven through it.

      Police are also looking at their connection with a
      Nigerian man arrested in Dublin earlier this month in
      connection with the investigation. Sam Onogigovie, 37,
      was held under an extradition warrant issued by police
      in Germany, where he has been convicted of crimes
      linked to human trafficking. Detectives from Scotland
      Yard also questioned him about the murder of Adam.

      Before being sent back to Nigeria, Joyce Osagiede was
      interviewed by detectives and admitted buying an
      identical pair of orange shorts to the ones found on
      Adam's torso. They are only available from Woolworth's
      in Germany, where she lived for 10 years before making
      her way to Britain, just a few weeks after the torso
      was found.

      She claimed asylum, telling immigration officers she
      was fleeing her estranged husband, Sam Onojhighovie,
      who she claimed had been responsible for 10 ritual
      killings over a one-year period and was linked to a
      sinister Nigerian cult accused in the past of a voodoo
      slaying. Onojhighovie is currently in prison in Dublin
      awaiting extradition to Germany where he was convicted
      in his absence of people-trafficking and fraud and
      sentenced to seven years in jail.

      Osagiede made the claims to immigration officials
      before her deportation from London to Nigeria last year
      that she and her husband had been setting up branches
      linked to a Nigerian cult known as 'One Love Family,'
      and that her husband was responsible for a series of
      black magic killings of the children of devotees. She
      also said that she and other female disciples were
      forced to undergo ritual circumcision. Her brother has
      since said that she told him that she made these claims
      only as a ruse to win asylum in Britain.

      The Metropolitan Police had asked their Nigerian
      counterparts to keep track of Osagiede as she remains a
      key figure in their inquiries. The Telegraph
      established last week, however, that the Nigerian
      police no longer knew her whereabouts. Her brother,
      Victor Imade Agho, revealed that Ms Osagiede
      disappeared 18 days ago, after receiving a threatening
      visit from a woman from her estranged husband's home
      region, and believed to be a member of the same cult.

      The cult's "living perfect master," a 55-year-old
      Nigerian who adopted the trappings of an Indian holy
      man and the title Satguru Maharajji after a visit to
      London in 1980, claims that he was aware of the
      allegations from media reports but dismissed them as
      "negative propaganda" and an attempt to "misrepresent
      the father of all creation". He was not sure whether Ms
      Osagiede or Onijhighovie were among his followers. "In
      any case," he added, "if someone reads The Sunday
      Telegraph and then commits armed robbery, is The Sunday
      Telegraph responsible for his crime?"

      It is not the first time that the cult leader has faced
      claims that are at odds with his public calls for world
      peace. In 2000 he was acquitted of murdering a Ghanaian
      who had alleged that his sister was being held by the
      One Love Family against her will.

      Then a Nigerian magazine published the account last
      year of a former devotee who claimed that the cult
      undertook a "blood initiation rite" in which five
      participants died. "In most cases, when somebody dies,
      they cut open his chest, remove the heart, the liver
      and the kidney," the man was quoted as saying. "They
      use it to prepare a concoction and people drink it
      during the initiations."

      The Maharajji, who dismissed such claims as smears,
      told me that he and his followers were vegetarians so
      allegations that they devoured human organs were
      baseless. "It is natural that I should face some
      opposition when I bring the truth," he said. He claimed
      that Jesus, Mohammed, Buddha, Krishna, Adam, Abraham,
      and John the Baptist were among earlier "divine
      masters" but that he was the first "living perfect
      master." He also claims that Nigeria is the "New Holy
      Land of the Universe" and his ashram at Ibadan, 80
      miles north of Lagos, its highest spiritual center.

      Agho said his sister had been driven to the point of a
      mental breakdown after reports about the case appeared
      in Nigerian newspapers three weeks ago, featuring the
      allegations she had made about her husband. "She kept
      repeating that she never said those things," said Agho.
      "She said that she had not seen Sam since he left her,
      but she was sure he would never have killed anyone."

      Agho proudly displayed the family photo albums
      containing photographs of his sister, who is now 32,
      proudly posing next to a white Mercedes and a white
      Audi while standing outside a well-maintained apartment
      block, an indication that the couple enjoyed a
      comfortable life in Germany.

      Agho said his sister disappeared after a visit from a
      woman called Mercy who said that people had telephoned
      her from London angered by her reported remarks. There
      were no witnesses to the exchange, but her relatives
      said Ms Osagiede spent the following night "weeping and
      hollering" and she disappeared the next day, apparently
      without taking a change of clothes with her. When her
      brother tried to report her missing to the local
      Nigerian police, they told him that she would probably
      come home soon.

      Det. Insp. Will O'Reilly, in charge of the inquiry into
      Adam's death, thanked The Telegraph for informing him
      of her disappearance. He said: "We will investigate her
      whereabouts and we will contact the Nigerian
      authorities."

      -- Edited and excerpted from the articles by Philip
      Sherwell in Benin City and Daniel Foggo for Telegraph
      UK
      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/20
      03/08/24/ntorso24.xml&sSheet=/news/2003/08/24/ixhome.ht
      ml

      -- By Henry Everingham in SMH August 28, 2003
      http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/08/27/1061663841572
      .html

      -- Telegraph UK August 31, 2003
      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/20
      03/08/31/wguru31.xml&sSheet=/news/2003/08/31/ixworld.ht
      ml

      -- and BBC NEWS:July 29, 2003
      http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/england/london/31
      05779.stm

      Previous related article in Criminal Minds Archive:

      Ritual killings 'pushing double figures'
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/criminalminds/message/191
      1

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      Judge Turns Case Over Against Mother Accused of Helping
      Cover Up Murder

      September 8, 2003 JONESBOROUGH, TN -- Saying he could
      not continue presiding over the case against Howard
      Hawk Willis' mother because he could not be neutral,
      Criminal Court Judge Lynn Brown turned it over to a
      colleague last week. Emma Elizabeth Hawks is accused of
      helping her son cover up the murder and dismemberment
      of a newlywed teenage couple from Georgia.

      Seventeen-year-old Adam Chrismer's hands and head were
      found in a Johnson City lake and his body, along with
      that of his 16-year-old wife Samantha Leming, were
      found in a Johnson City storage shed rented by Hawk.

      Brown said he could no longer preside over Hawk's trial
      because of evidence he heard during the probation
      hearing for her sister, who was sentenced to two months
      in jail for trying to destroy a reputed confession
      tape. The tape played at the hearing for Marie Holmes
      included repeated orders from the sisters to Willis'
      ex-wife that she erase a tape in which he confessed to
      killing Chrismer and Leming.

      "I've already heard the evidence on one of the charges
      against Ms. Hawk -- and it's almost as if this court
      has heard her case tried and she wasn't here," Brown
      said Friday. "Under those circumstances, under the
      rules of ethics, the court has no choice but to recuse
      itself and give this to another judge."

      Hawk, 72, is charged with two counts of abuse of a
      corpse and one count each of being an accessory after
      the fact of first-degree murder and soliciting the
      tampering of evidence. Brown was referring to the
      solicitation charge because her sister was charged with
      the same crime.

      "If I can't come in with an open mind and be just
      completely fair and unopinionated and unbiased, I'm not
      going to try a case," he said. He gave the case to
      fellow Criminal Court Judge Bob Cupp and it was reset
      for Oct. 14. Brown will continue to preside over the
      case against Willis, who is charged with two counts
      each of first-degree murder and abuse of a corpse.

      Clifton Corker, Hawk's attorney, said his client did
      not have an opinion about whether there was an
      advantage to Brown giving up the case.

      "She wants Judge Brown to make the right decisions, and
      I think if Judge Brown has a concern about his ability
      to do so, then he did the right thing," he said.

      Authorities contend Willis killed the teens last
      October in a sex-for-drugs scheme. He's also a suspect
      in the dismemberment slaying of his stepfather, Sam
      Thomas last October. Thomas' headless, handless torso
      was recovered near a vacant trailer on Lookout
      Mountain, Ga., and his head was found near a Johnson
      City park.

      -- Associated Press
      http://www.oakridger.com/stories/090803/new_20030908013
      .shtml

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      Jury Selection Tomorrow in Scarsdale Man's Murder Trial

      August 25, 2003 -- Suspicion in his wife's
      disappearance has hounded Robert Durst for more than
      two decades. It intensified when his best friend was
      shot to death in Los Angeles three years ago -- and
      grew even more when he admitted killing a cantankerous
      neighbor in Texas and was accused of chopping up his
      body and setting it adrift in Galveston Bay.

      Now, as the 60-year-old Scarsdale native and scion of a
      Manhattan real estate empire goes on trial in that
      Galveston killing, investigators in northern California
      are taking a close look at Durst, suspecting he might
      have played a role in the disappearance of two teenage
      girls there in 1997 -- 18-year-old Kristen Modafferi in
      San Francisco and 16-year-old Karen Mitchell in Eureka.

      Jury selection in Durst's murder trial will begin
      tomorrow and could take several weeks as his lawyers
      try to find jurors who won't hold their client's wealth
      against him and aren't influenced by publicity about
      him. He has admitted killing Morris Black, a former
      merchant seaman who seemed to live an even more nomadic
      life than the cross-dressing, eccentric Durst. However,
      Durst maintains that the killing was in self-defense.

      Judge Susan Criss has ruled that jurors will not hear
      about the two sensational cases that have dogged Durst,
      the pressure of which, his supporters have suggested,
      might have made him snap in the fatal altercation with
      Black. The latest revelations that Durst is a person of
      interest in the California cases were scoffed at by his
      lead attorney in Texas.

      "I'm not surprised that there is a flurry of
      misinformation and sensationalist claims," said Dick
      DeGuerin, who would not comment about the trial because
      of a gag order imposed last year by Criss. "The closer
      we get to trial, the more nuts are going to come out
      with claims like this."

      In each California teen case, investigators are stymied
      by the lack of a body and proof that the vanished woman
      was the victim of foul play - the same problem
      Westchester authorities have in solving the 1982
      disappearance of Kathleen Durst.

      Durst and his 29-year-old wife had apartments in
      Manhattan and a cottage on Hoyt Street in South Salem
      early that year. She was just a few months shy of
      graduation from Albert Einstein Medical College, and
      there were tensions in the marriage, with friends
      saying she talked about seeking a divorce.

      She vanished Jan. 31, 1982, although Durst did not
      report her missing for five days. He told police in
      Manhattan that he had dropped her off at the Katonah
      train station that night, and the investigation
      remained a Manhattan missing-person case, primarily
      because of reported sightings of her that are now discr
      edited.

      At the time, Durst was the heir apparent to one of
      Manhattan's wealthiest real estate families. The Durst
      Organization, founded by his grandfather and run by his
      father, Seymour, owns Times Square skyscrapers and is
      now worth an estimated $650 million. Although Durst
      continued to work for the family business into the
      1990s, control of the company was eventually turned
      over to his younger brother, Douglas, and he became
      estranged from most of his relatives.

      He obtained a divorce in Westchester County Court in
      1990, citing spousal abandonment - and 10 years later
      married a longtime girlfriend, real estate broker
      Debrah Charatan.

      The missing-person case grew cold. Then four years ago,
      Investigator Joseph Becerra of the state police got a
      tip that Kathleen Durst had been killed in the South
      Salem home. The house, which Durst had sold in 1990,
      was searched to no avail. However, the tip led to the
      reopening of the investigation with a focus no longer
      in Manhattan but in Westchester.

      In the fall of 2000, news of the investigation was
      followed by a flurry of activity. Durst married
      Charatan in December. Two weeks later, on Christmas
      Eve, the body of Susan Berman, a writer and daughter of
      a Las Vegas mobster, was discovered in her Los Angeles
      home. She had been shot in the back of the head. Berman
      and Durst had been friends since the late 1960s, when
      they met in Los Angeles at the University of
      California. Durst had given Berman away when she was
      married and reportedly gave her $50,000 in the months
      before she was killed.

      Westchester County authorities had wanted to interview
      Berman at the time about Kathleen Durst's
      disappearance. No one has been charged in Berman's
      homicide.

      Durst had several homes around the country, in the San
      Francisco area, in Dallas and in New York. As suspicion
      mounted about him the following summer, he was in a
      Galveston apartment he rented, posing as a deaf mute
      named Dorothy Ciner. He had "borrowed" the name from a
      Scarsdale High School classmate, who told authorities
      she hadn't seen or spoken to him in years.

      Black, 71, lived across the hall from Durst, and they
      were known to argue frequently. In late September 2001,
      a teenage boy fishing with his stepfather spotted a
      headless torso floating in the bay with garbage bags
      nearby filled with legs and arms. Evidence found in the
      bags helped identify Black, and more items found in
      their building's garbage and bloodstains in his
      apartment made Durst a suspect. He was arrested eight
      days later, and police found a knife, handgun, and
      marijuana in his car.

      Before Texas officials knew of Durst's history, bail
      was set at $300,000, which he posted with Charatan's
      help. He skipped his court appearance five days later,
      and the fugitive heir remained on the lam for seven
      weeks. In Bath, Pa. -- near Lehigh University, where he
      went to college -- he was accused of stealing a chicken
      sandwich from a grocery store, even though he had $500
      in his pocket and $38,000 in his car, which he had
      rented under the name Morris Black. He was returned to
      Texas in early 2002 and has been in jail, awaiting
      trial, ever since.

      Durst crisscrossed the country while skipping bail, and
      one of the places where he was reportedly seen was a
      campsite in the woods near Eureka, Calif. In the late
      1990s, one of several properties Durst owned in
      northern California was in Trinidad, about 20 miles
      from Eureka. Police in Eureka consider Durst one of
      several "investigative leads" they are tracking in the
      Nov. 25, 1997, disappearance of Karen Marie Mitchell.

      The 16-year-old girl was on her way to work at a
      day-care center that afternoon. A motorist believed to
      be the last person to see her told police that she was
      leaning into a light blue car that she might have
      gotten into, Eureka Detective David Parris said.

      A sketch of the suspect based on the witness' account
      showed an older man with gray hair and large-frame
      glasses, a look investigators recognized in the image
      of Durst when he appeared last year in a Pennsylvania
      court.

      "You have to admit that there are similarities between
      the sketch and Mr. Durst," Parris said. "He's a lead
      we're following, and with all the information we've
      learned about him, I'm not fully comfortable that I can
      eliminate him from our investigation at this point."

      Parris said a suspect in the case remains Wayne Adam
      Ford, a trucker who admitted in 1998 to killing four
      women in the region and who is about to go on trial.
      But he acknowledges that Ford, who has denied any
      involvement in the Mitchell case, looks nothing like
      the sketch and is considerably younger than the man
      seen driving the car.

      Information linking Durst to the two California cases
      was first reported in publicity material for the
      paperback edition of "A Deadly Secret," writer Matt
      Berkbeck's book about the Durst saga that will be
      published next week.

      Five months before Mitchell disappeared, Modafferi
      vanished after leaving her waitress job at a San
      Francisco coffee shop, headed for Land's End Beach on
      San Francisco Bay in Oakland. One of the original
      detectives in that case, John Bradley, is now an
      investigator with the San Francisco District Attorney's
      Office and has spent the past several months
      investigating Durst's ties to northern California. He
      said information he has obtained put Durst in the area
      at least on the weekend before Modafferi disappeared
      and on the day that Mitchell went missing, although
      Parris said he was still looking into whether Durst was
      in Eureka that day.

      Bradley, too, sees similarities between Durst and the
      sketch in the Mitchell case, but is even more intrigued
      by the description of the car. Although Durst had a
      green Ford Explorer in northern California at the time,
      a drug user and prostitute who reported Durst
      befriended her told authorities she only knew him to
      drive a light blue car, Bradley said.

      Durst had developed a pattern of disguising himself,
      using assumed names and hanging out at homeless
      shelters. Parris is still investigating whether he
      could have met Mitchell at the Rescue Mission, a Eureka
      shelter where she occasionally volunteered.

      While those cases remain under investigation, Durst's
      lawyers will try to convince a Texas jury that the
      killing of Morris Black was not murder.

      Beginning tomorrow, Criss will hear hardship excuses
      from potential jurors. Lawyers will begin questioning
      juror candidates individually on Thursday, a process
      the defense agreed to last year to drop a request for a
      change of venue because of pretrial publicity.

      If convicted, Durst faces five to 99 years in prison.

      -- Edited from the article by Jonathan Bandler for The
      Journal News
      http://www.nyjournalnews.com/newsroom/082503/a0125durst
      .html

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      All In the Line of (Jury) Duty

      September 13, 2003 -- The trial is over but traumatized
      Snowtown jurors may have begun life sentences of their
      own.

      When they were called up for jury service, they would
      have had no idea what to expect. For the next 11
      months, the Snowtown jury was subjected to perhaps the
      most gruesome evidence ever presented to an Australian
      court. They heard of torture, dismemberment, and ritual
      killings.

      What effect would such an ordeal have on the lives -
      and the minds - of the metaphorical "12 good men and
      true" at the heart of the legal system? (In this case,
      they included six women.)

      According to one mental health expert, the unsuspecting
      jurors could suffer trauma as if they themselves had
      been tortured. Dr Nicholas Proctor, an associate
      professor of mental health at the University of South
      Australia, says the condition has a name: vicarious
      trauma.

      "They have been bystanders to horrific acts," he said.
      After the war in Bosnia, Proctor wrote a book on the
      psychological effects on civilians who had seen
      atrocities. Those affected, he says, were ordinary
      people who had involuntarily witnessed death and
      mutilation.

      The Snowtown jurors were plucked at random from the
      electoral roll last October. As part of the longest
      trial in South Australian criminal history, their
      normal lives were forgotten. The law prevented them
      from speaking about it, even to family, forcing them to
      bottle up what they experienced.

      Jurors saw photographs of the autopsies of eight murder
      victims in barrels in the disused Snowtown bank vault.
      They heard what was found in the barrels - large pieces
      of skin, matted knots of hair, a kneecap, bones,
      dismembered torsos, bodies slashed, tortured and cut.

      They heard evidence of the screams of the victims as
      they were tortured, as their toes were crushed with
      pliers, or as a sparkler inserted in a penis was lit
      and left to burn. One victim's arms, legs, breasts, and
      genitalia were cut off by ringleader John Bunting after
      she died. She was also decapitated.

      Four jurors were excused over 11 months. When it all
      finally concluded this week, 220 witnesses and $15
      million later, Justice Brian Martin exempted the jury
      from further service for life. He warned them not to
      have second thoughts. Books were being written about
      Snowtown, he said, and they may read or hear about it
      later but they should not be troubled over their guilty
      finding.

      "Do not look back with any second thoughts of any
      kind," he said. The jury's "valuable contribution"
      would be recompense for disruption to their lives.

      However, Proctor believes they will suffer much more
      than mere disruption. "They will suffer symptoms
      similar to someone who had first-hand trauma, because
      of the torture, particularly, that was described. The
      reaction would be that they cannot bear to hear any
      more. They would feel terror, helplessness, shame, and
      a sense of humiliation. At 11 months, this trauma was
      prolonged."

      Proctor predicts that the Snowtown evidence might
      disrupt jurors' sleep and shatter their faith in
      humanity. Some might detach themselves from everyday
      life as a reaction to seeing the worst aspects of the
      human condition.

      Some of the jury were counseled during the trial. After
      leaving the court, they were addressed by a
      psychiatrist. Flashbacks, nightmares, irritability, and
      sleeplessness could all be early warning signs of
      post-traumatic stress. Counseling will be provided in
      the future, as it will for Supreme Court officials and
      staff who saw and heard evidence. Proctor says this
      counseling should be similar to the counseling of
      torture survivors.

      "It should focus on the jurors' rage and emotions and
      their understanding of anger, and also those things
      which they feel perpetuate the traumatic experience.
      For those who feel hopeless, it should focus on what
      engulfs that hopelessness, or anguish, or despair."

      -- Edited from the article by Chris Johnston and
      Penelope Debelle for The Age
      http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/09/12/1063341772
      046.html

      . >^..^< . . . . . .

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    • Brandy
      Any information on this case? I have tried to follow it, but can t seem to find anything current. The news around here doesn t give it a second look and when
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 5, 2004
        Any information on this case? I have tried to follow it, but can't
        seem to find anything current. The news around here doesn't give it
        a second look and when they do it's a quick line on a ticker at the
        bottom of the screen during the lunch hour news report. One of the
        victims in this case was a very close person in my life. I went to
        school with his older brothers and Adam and my little brother were
        very close friends. He used to play at our house a lot when he was
        a child and I saw him a few days before his murder. Please forward
        any information or links that may be of use to my while I am
        attemting to follow this case. I appreciate any help you can
        offer. The anniversary of the death is approaching and he has been
        on my mind as of late.
        >
        > Judge Turns Case Over Against Mother Accused of Helping
        > Cover Up Murder
        >
        > September 8, 2003 JONESBOROUGH, TN -- Saying he could
        > not continue presiding over the case against Howard
        > Hawk Willis' mother because he could not be neutral,
        > Criminal Court Judge Lynn Brown turned it over to a
        > colleague last week. Emma Elizabeth Hawks is accused of
        > helping her son cover up the murder and dismemberment
        > of a newlywed teenage couple from Georgia.
        >
        > Seventeen-year-old Adam Chrismer's hands and head were
        > found in a Johnson City lake and his body, along with
        > that of his 16-year-old wife Samantha Leming, were
        > found in a Johnson City storage shed rented by Hawk.
        >
        > Brown said he could no longer preside over Hawk's trial
        > because of evidence he heard during the probation
        > hearing for her sister, who was sentenced to two months
        > in jail for trying to destroy a reputed confession
        > tape. The tape played at the hearing for Marie Holmes
        > included repeated orders from the sisters to Willis'
        > ex-wife that she erase a tape in which he confessed to
        > killing Chrismer and Leming.
        >
        > "I've already heard the evidence on one of the charges
        > against Ms. Hawk -- and it's almost as if this court
        > has heard her case tried and she wasn't here," Brown
        > said Friday. "Under those circumstances, under the
        > rules of ethics, the court has no choice but to recuse
        > itself and give this to another judge."
        >
        > Hawk, 72, is charged with two counts of abuse of a
        > corpse and one count each of being an accessory after
        > the fact of first-degree murder and soliciting the
        > tampering of evidence. Brown was referring to the
        > solicitation charge because her sister was charged with
        > the same crime.
        >
        > "If I can't come in with an open mind and be just
        > completely fair and unopinionated and unbiased, I'm not
        > going to try a case," he said. He gave the case to
        > fellow Criminal Court Judge Bob Cupp and it was reset
        > for Oct. 14. Brown will continue to preside over the
        > case against Willis, who is charged with two counts
        > each of first-degree murder and abuse of a corpse.
        >
        > Clifton Corker, Hawk's attorney, said his client did
        > not have an opinion about whether there was an
        > advantage to Brown giving up the case.
        >
        > "She wants Judge Brown to make the right decisions, and
        > I think if Judge Brown has a concern about his ability
        > to do so, then he did the right thing," he said.
        >
        > Authorities contend Willis killed the teens last
        > October in a sex-for-drugs scheme. He's also a suspect
        > in the dismemberment slaying of his stepfather, Sam
        > Thomas last October. Thomas' headless, handless torso
        > was recovered near a vacant trailer on Lookout
        > Mountain, Ga., and his head was found near a Johnson
        > City park.
        >
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