Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

M. of V. Act 1

Expand Messages
  • Rufus
    Spoiler Act 1. Scene 1. Antonio is an interesting old guy who surrounds himself with attractive young men. Nuff said. He is what we might call a venture
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 4, 2008
    • 0 Attachment

      Spoiler

      Act 1.

      Scene 1. 
      Antonio is an interesting old guy who surrounds himself with attractive young men. 'Nuff said. He is what we might call a "venture capitalist", trading spices, slaves, probably guns, drugs have not been thought of yet but watch this space. He is pretty confident, having spread his risk quite well, but at the moment is a little short of the ready. Bassanio is a real lightweight who has borrowed money in the past and lost it; his solution is to have another gamble. This time he wants a lot of money to dress up and pretend to be rich so he can catch the lovely, and rich, Portia. A bit morally suss this guy but Antonio, for reasons which escape me (well, actually I do have a fair idea) is prepared to lend him a helluva lot of money, but is going to have to borrow it on the short term money market. Where many a clever chap has gone adrift before and since.

      Scene 2 is an explanatory bit to set up the subsidiary plot of Portia and her dear old dead dad's caskets.

      Scene 3 is where the action is. The question that this play hinges on is answered in this scene: " Why would a smart cookie like Antonio fall for the 'pound of flesh' gag ?" The answer lies in a combination of Antonio's high opinion of his own cleverness and importance, with his  contempt for " The Jew". Bad career move, Antonio! Shylock runs the "bit of fun" line – a "merry sport" and challenges Antonio to see it the same way...does Antonio think for a minute that a Jew could conceivably outsmart him? Is the Pope a Jew? Ridiculous, and Shylock has  got him. Go Shylock!!

      Bassanio is worried with good reason. You know Tony Soprano would be at home with this lot.

      Rufus
    • Renee Mouilso
      Rufus---what a charming & educational way of outlining our story. If only Cliff Notes were that entertaining. Go Rufus! Looking forward to Act II Renee ...
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 4, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Rufus---what a charming & educational way of outlining our story. If only Cliff Notes were that entertaining. Go Rufus! Looking forward to Act II
        Renee

        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Rufus <dgsc@...>
        To: crgII@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, June 4, 2008 2:19:44 AM
        Subject: [crgII] M. of V. Act 1


        Spoiler

        Act 1.

        Scene 1. 
        Antonio is an interesting old guy who surrounds himself with attractive young men. 'Nuff said. He is what we might call a "venture capitalist", trading spices, slaves, probably guns, drugs have not been thought of yet but watch this space. He is pretty confident, having spread his risk quite well, but at the moment is a little short of the ready. Bassanio is a real lightweight who has borrowed money in the past and lost it; his solution is to have another gamble. This time he wants a lot of money to dress up and pretend to be rich so he can catch the lovely, and rich, Portia. A bit morally suss this guy but Antonio, for reasons which escape me (well, actually I do have a fair idea) is prepared to lend him a helluva lot of money, but is going to have to borrow it on the short term money market. Where many a clever chap has gone adrift before and since.

        Scene 2 is an explanatory bit to set up the subsidiary plot of Portia and her dear old dead dad's caskets.

        Scene 3 is where the action is. The question that this play hinges on is answered in this scene: " Why would a smart cookie like Antonio fall for the 'pound of flesh' gag ?" The answer lies in a combination of Antonio's high opinion of his own cleverness and importance, with his  contempt for " The Jew". Bad career move, Antonio! Shylock runs the "bit of fun" line – a "merry sport" and challenges Antonio to see it the same way...does Antonio think for a minute that a Jew could conceivably outsmart him? Is the Pope a Jew? Ridiculous, and Shylock has  got him. Go Shylock!!

        Bassanio is worried with good reason. You know Tony Soprano would be at home with this lot.

        Rufus

      • Marion
        I didn t think anyone could get me to read The Merchant again, after horrendous school experiences with Shakespeare; but, Rufus, your summaries have me hooked.
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 6, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          I didn't think anyone could get me to read The Merchant again, after
          horrendous school experiences with Shakespeare; but, Rufus, your
          summaries have me hooked.

          Who, after reading what Antonio has done to Shylock: spitting at him,
          for instance, can't understand & sympathise with S's desire for revenge.

          More power to his elbow, say I.

          Marion

          --- In crgII@yahoogroups.com, Rufus <dgsc@...> wrote:


          >> Scene 3 is where the action is. The question that this play hinges on
          > is answered in this scene: " Why would a smart cookie like Antonio
          > fall for the 'pound of flesh' gag ?" The answer lies in a combination
          > of Antonio's high opinion of his own cleverness and importance, with
          > his contempt for " The Jew". Bad career move, Antonio! Shylock runs
          > the "bit of fun" line – a "merry sport" and challenges Antonio to see
          > it the same way...does Antonio think for a minute that a Jew could
          > conceivably outsmart him? Is the Pope a Jew? Ridiculous, and Shylock
          > has got him. Go Shylock!!
        • Johanna
          This is really funny but you hit the point! One quote I liked: Portia: I can easier teach twenty what were good to be done, than be one of the twenty to follow
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 12, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            This is really funny but you hit the point!
            One quote I liked:
            Portia: I can easier teach twenty what were good to be done, than be
            one of the twenty to follow mine own teaching.

            Johanna

            --- In crgII@yahoogroups.com, Rufus <dgsc@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            Spoiler
            >
            > Act 1.
            >
            > Scene 1.
            > Antonio is an interesting old guy who surrounds himself with
            > attractive young men. 'Nuff said. He is what we might call
            a "venture
            > capitalist", trading spices, slaves, probably guns, drugs have not
            > been thought of yet but watch this space. He is pretty confident,
            > having spread his risk quite well, but at the moment is a little
            > short of the ready. Bassanio is a real lightweight who has
            borrowed
            > money in the past and lost it; his solution is to have another
            > gamble. This time he wants a lot of money to dress up and pretend
            to
            > be rich so he can catch the lovely, and rich, Portia. A bit
            morally
            > suss this guy but Antonio, for reasons which escape me (well,
            > actually I do have a fair idea) is prepared to lend him a helluva
            lot
            > of money, but is going to have to borrow it on the short term
            money
            > market. Where many a clever chap has gone adrift before and since.
            >
            > Scene 2 is an explanatory bit to set up the subsidiary plot of
            Portia
            > and her dear old dead dad's caskets.
            >
            > Scene 3 is where the action is. The question that this play hinges
            on
            > is answered in this scene: " Why would a smart cookie like Antonio
            > fall for the 'pound of flesh' gag ?" The answer lies in a
            combination
            > of Antonio's high opinion of his own cleverness and importance,
            with
            > his contempt for " The Jew". Bad career move, Antonio! Shylock
            runs
            > the "bit of fun" line – a "merry sport" and challenges Antonio to
            see
            > it the same way...does Antonio think for a minute that a Jew could
            > conceivably outsmart him? Is the Pope a Jew? Ridiculous, and
            Shylock
            > has got him. Go Shylock!!
            >
            > Bassanio is worried with good reason. You know Tony Soprano would
            be
            > at home with this lot.
            >
            > Rufus
            >
          • Johanna
            is Antonio an old guy? I missed something. Johanna ... Spoiler ... a venture ... borrowed ... to ... morally ... lot ... money ... Portia ... on ...
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 14, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              is Antonio an old guy? I missed something.
              Johanna

              --- In crgII@yahoogroups.com, Rufus <dgsc@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              Spoiler
              >
              > Act 1.
              >
              > Scene 1.
              > Antonio is an interesting old guy who surrounds himself with
              > attractive young men. 'Nuff said. He is what we might call
              a "venture
              > capitalist", trading spices, slaves, probably guns, drugs have not
              > been thought of yet but watch this space. He is pretty confident,
              > having spread his risk quite well, but at the moment is a little
              > short of the ready. Bassanio is a real lightweight who has
              borrowed
              > money in the past and lost it; his solution is to have another
              > gamble. This time he wants a lot of money to dress up and pretend
              to
              > be rich so he can catch the lovely, and rich, Portia. A bit
              morally
              > suss this guy but Antonio, for reasons which escape me (well,
              > actually I do have a fair idea) is prepared to lend him a helluva
              lot
              > of money, but is going to have to borrow it on the short term
              money
              > market. Where many a clever chap has gone adrift before and since.
              >
              > Scene 2 is an explanatory bit to set up the subsidiary plot of
              Portia
              > and her dear old dead dad's caskets.
              >
              > Scene 3 is where the action is. The question that this play hinges
              on
              > is answered in this scene: " Why would a smart cookie like Antonio
              > fall for the 'pound of flesh' gag ?" The answer lies in a
              combination
              > of Antonio's high opinion of his own cleverness and importance,
              with
              > his contempt for " The Jew". Bad career move, Antonio! Shylock
              runs
              > the "bit of fun" line – a "merry sport" and challenges Antonio to
              see
              > it the same way...does Antonio think for a minute that a Jew could
              > conceivably outsmart him? Is the Pope a Jew? Ridiculous, and
              Shylock
              > has got him. Go Shylock!!
              >
              > Bassanio is worried with good reason. You know Tony Soprano would
              be
              > at home with this lot.
              >
              > Rufus
              >
            • Rufus
              Well, now you ask, Johanna I have to think about why I said old guy . Firstly, by old I mean a man fully established in life, financially, socially, and
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 14, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Well, now you ask, Johanna I have to think about why I said "old guy". Firstly, by old I mean a man fully established in life, financially, socially, and career–wise: I imagine early 'fifties. Antonio is certainly established in business with connections, property, money: this is not recently inherited; he is a 'man of respect' in the market. At the opening of he play, Antonio is surrounded by men who, I think, sound young and rather brash; note how they defer to him. Also, to be truthful, I have seen a few versions of the M.of V. and he always seems to be played by an older man: how is that  for a a non sequitur comment! 
                Rufus

                On 14/06/2008, at 11:50 PM, Johanna wrote:

                is Antonio an old guy? I missed something.
                Johanna

                --- In crgII@yahoogroups. com, Rufus <dgsc@...> wrote:
                >
                > 
                > 
                Spoiler
                > 
                > Act 1.
                > 
                > Scene 1.
                > Antonio is an interesting old guy who surrounds himself with 
                > attractive young men. 'Nuff said. He is what we might call 
                a "venture 
                > capitalist", trading spices, slaves, probably guns, drugs have not 
                > been thought of yet but watch this space. He is pretty confident, 
                > having spread his risk quite well, but at the moment is a little 
                > short of the ready. Bassanio is a real lightweight who has 
                borrowed 
                > money in the past and lost it; his solution is to have another 
                > gamble. This time he wants a lot of money to dress up and pretend 
                to 
                > be rich so he can catch the lovely, and rich, Portia. A bit 
                morally 
                > suss this guy but Antonio, for reasons which escape me (well, 
                > actually I do have a fair idea) is prepared to lend him a helluva 
                lot 
                > of money, but is going to have to borrow it on the short term 
                money 
                > market. Where many a clever chap has gone adrift before and since.
                > 
                > Scene 2 is an explanatory bit to set up the subsidiary plot of 
                Portia 
                > and her dear old dead dad's caskets.
                > 
                > Scene 3 is where the action is. The question that this play hinges 
                on 
                > is answered in this scene: " Why would a smart cookie like Antonio 
                > fall for the 'pound of flesh' gag ?" The answer lies in a 
                combination 
                > of Antonio's high opinion of his own cleverness and importance, 
                with 
                > his contempt for " The Jew". Bad career move, Antonio! Shylock 
                runs 
                > the "bit of fun" line – a "merry sport" and challenges Antonio to 
                see 
                > it the same way...does Antonio think for a minute that a Jew could 
                > conceivably outsmart him? Is the Pope a Jew? Ridiculous, and 
                Shylock 
                > has got him. Go Shylock!!
                > 
                > Bassanio is worried with good reason. You know Tony Soprano would 
                be 
                > at home with this lot.
                > 
                > Rufus
                >


              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.