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Happy Father's Day James Joyce!

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  • Bekah
    ... Yes, it s Father s Day, but it s also Bloomsday! Today marks the anniversary of when James Joyce first stepped out with Nora Barnacle, a chambermaid
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 16, 2013
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      On Jun 15, 2013, at 1:06 PM, jeffrey jackson <jjack7@...> wrote:

      > Instead I nominate Ulysses by Joyce.
      > It's been on my shelf for over 10 years and I want to tackle it sometime. Jeff.

      Yes, it's Father's Day, but it's also Bloomsday!

      Today marks the anniversary of when James Joyce first "stepped out" with Nora Barnacle, a chambermaid at a local hotel. Later that same year the couple emigrated to Europe and then stayed together the rest of Joyce's life, but not legally marrying until 1931 following the births of two children.

      To honor the date Joyce had Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus take a little Ulysses-like stroll through Dublin on that exact day (June 16, 1904) in the book Ulysses which he's started in 1915 or so. It was published in 1922.

      Joyce was not esteemed in Dublin until much later, but today he is celebrated and Dublin holds a huge annual "Bloomsday" celebration in which many fans walk Bloom's route.

      An excellent day to start reading Ulysses!

      Happy Father's Day James Joyce! :-) - and whomever else here is a father -

      Bekah
    • jeffrey jackson
      Bekah, would you mind sharing briefly your thoughts on Ulysses? Specifically is it as good as all the critics say, and is it worth the effort that I think it s
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 16, 2013
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        Bekah, would you mind sharing briefly your thoughts on Ulysses? Specifically is it as good as all the critics say, and is it worth the effort that I think it's going to take?  Does anyone else have any thoughts on ulysses?Thanks. Jeff. 

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Jun 16, 2013, at 10:41 AM, "Bekah" <bekah0176@...> wrote:

         

        On Jun 15, 2013, at 1:06 PM, jeffrey jackson <jjack7@...> wrote:

        > Instead I nominate Ulysses by Joyce.
        > It's been on my shelf for over 10 years and I want to tackle it sometime. Jeff.

        Yes, it's Father's Day, but it's also Bloomsday!

        Today marks the anniversary of when James Joyce first "stepped out" with Nora Barnacle, a chambermaid at a local hotel. Later that same year the couple emigrated to Europe and then stayed together the rest of Joyce's life, but not legally marrying until 1931 following the births of two children.

        To honor the date Joyce had Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus take a little Ulysses-like stroll through Dublin on that exact day (June 16, 1904) in the book Ulysses which he's started in 1915 or so. It was published in 1922.

        Joyce was not esteemed in Dublin until much later, but today he is celebrated and Dublin holds a huge annual "Bloomsday" celebration in which many fans walk Bloom's route.

        An excellent day to start reading Ulysses!

        Happy Father's Day James Joyce! :-) - and whomever else here is a father -

        Bekah

      • Bekah
        ... Is it as good as all the critics say? Not really, imo, - but I think that yes, it is as important to the development of Western literature as any
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 16, 2013
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          On Jun 16, 2013, at 7:47 AM, jeffrey jackson <jjack7@...> wrote:

          > Bekah, would you mind sharing briefly your thoughts on Ulysses? Specifically is it as good as all the critics say, and is it worth the effort that I think it's going to take? Does anyone else have any thoughts on ulysses?Thanks. Jeff.


          "Is it as 'good' as all the critics say?" Not really, imo, - but I think that yes, it is as important to the development of Western literature as any of them say. I don't think "good" equals "important." What do you mean by "good"?

          Ulysses is incredibly dense and difficult to just read - and it's harder to comprehend. The first-time reader has to make his way through the really strange words (Irish dialect usually) and winding sentences in various styles (a pastiche) while maintaining a sense of the general "plot" (such as it is - more like a bunch of little episodes). As Bloom walks along he meets and greets a whole variety of people and he goes to various places, does various things and finally meets Dedalus (who is introduced in the first 3 chapters) after which they have a couple of joint adventures.

          During the course of their walks they ponder a lot of stuff, the narrators (I think more than one) add more stuff, and both Bloom and Dedalus go off on their own streams of consciousness (as does Molly, Bloom's wife, in the last chapter). Bloom is a mess of contradictions - he's half Jewish, his son died, his wife is having an affair with a singer, he's got something going with someone named Martha. But even with all this he speculates on everyone he sees (I think - heh). Dedalus is a very confused young and single school teacher who is interested in really arcane stuff and drinking and women. But the two take a liking to each other and it's like a little father/son thing - in a way (from what I understand).

          There's no way a normally literate 21st century US reader can understand a whole lot of this in the first or second reading without substantial background and I didn't do that - all I know is the general settings and overall plot. I used a basic summary guide to make sure I didn't totally miss something big - heh. I didn't, but I was very insecure.

          Imo, the reason it's so famous is because of the impact it had on Western literature - the Homeric influence and structural parallels, stream-of-consciousness, other structural elements (same day, back and forth between characters, the pastiche, the Irish history, Irish Catholic Church trivia , English language history, weirdo (to me!) word play, and arcane allusions to I don't know what all. And none of this is explained at all. The reader is dumped into it. It's not famous for it's beautiful language!

          Hope that helps - I'd go ahead and give it a try - follow a summary guide, don't try for all the allusions or you'll quit by page 20. If it's over your head just keep reading - like Faulkner only different - and harder because the native language is not American English - it's older Irish.

          Bekah


          >
          > Sent from my iPhone
          >
          > On Jun 16, 2013, at 10:41 AM, "Bekah" <bekah0176@...> wrote:
          >
          >> On Jun 15, 2013, at 1:06 PM, jeffrey jackson <jjack7@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> > Instead I nominate Ulysses by Joyce.
          >> > It's been on my shelf for over 10 years and I want to tackle it sometime. Jeff.
          >>
          >> Yes, it's Father's Day, but it's also Bloomsday!
          >>
          >> Today marks the anniversary of when James Joyce first "stepped out" with Nora Barnacle, a chambermaid at a local hotel. Later that same year the couple emigrated to Europe and then stayed together the rest of Joyce's life, but not legally marrying until 1931 following the births of two children.
          >>
          >> To honor the date Joyce had Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus take a little Ulysses-like stroll through Dublin on that exact day (June 16, 1904) in the book Ulysses which he's started in 1915 or so. It was published in 1922.
          >>
          >> Joyce was not esteemed in Dublin until much later, but today he is celebrated and Dublin holds a huge annual "Bloomsday" celebration in which many fans walk Bloom's route.
          >>
          >> An excellent day to start reading Ulysses!
          >>
          >> Happy Father's Day James Joyce! :-) - and whomever else here is a father -
          >>
          >> Bekah
          >>
          >
          >
          >
        • jeffrey jackson
          Thanks Bekah. That s helpful. I have no idea what I mean by good . I suppose I mean it s good if, when I finish it, I m glad that I read it instead of
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 16, 2013
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            Thanks Bekah. That's helpful.
            I have no idea what I mean by "good". I suppose I mean it's good if, when I finish it, I'm glad that I read it instead of regretting the time I spent on it.
            One of my top 3 or 4 books of all time is  Absalom! Absalom!  It is incredibly difficult to read, but when I finished I felt I had read a major work of art. I hope I can feel the same about Ulysses. 
            Even though In Search of Lost Time is massive, I don't feel that it is a difficult read, at least so far. And I feel like the time I've put into it has been worthwhile. Jeff. 

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Jun 16, 2013, at 1:17 PM, "Bekah" <bekah0176@...> wrote:

             

            On Jun 16, 2013, at 7:47 AM, jeffrey jackson <jjack7@...> wrote:

            > Bekah, would you mind sharing briefly your thoughts on Ulysses? Specifically is it as good as all the critics say, and is it worth the effort that I think it's going to take? Does anyone else have any thoughts on ulysses?Thanks. Jeff.

            "Is it as 'good' as all the critics say?" Not really, imo, - but I think that yes, it is as important to the development of Western literature as any of them say. I don't think "good" equals "important." What do you mean by "good"?

            Ulysses is incredibly dense and difficult to just read - and it's harder to comprehend. The first-time reader has to make his way through the really strange words (Irish dialect usually) and winding sentences in various styles (a pastiche) while maintaining a sense of the general "plot" (such as it is - more like a bunch of little episodes). As Bloom walks along he meets and greets a whole variety of people and he goes to various places, does various things and finally meets Dedalus (who is introduced in the first 3 chapters) after which they have a couple of joint adventures.

            During the course of their walks they ponder a lot of stuff, the narrators (I think more than one) add more stuff, and both Bloom and Dedalus go off on their own streams of consciousness (as does Molly, Bloom's wife, in the last chapter). Bloom is a mess of contradictions - he's half Jewish, his son died, his wife is having an affair with a singer, he's got something going with someone named Martha. But even with all this he speculates on everyone he sees (I think - heh). Dedalus is a very confused young and single school teacher who is interested in really arcane stuff and drinking and women. But the two take a liking to each other and it's like a little father/son thing - in a way (from what I understand).

            There's no way a normally literate 21st century US reader can understand a whole lot of this in the first or second reading without substantial background and I didn't do that - all I know is the general settings and overall plot. I used a basic summary guide to make sure I didn't totally miss something big - heh. I didn't, but I was very insecure.

            Imo, the reason it's so famous is because of the impact it had on Western literature - the Homeric influence and structural parallels, stream-of-consciousness, other structural elements (same day, back and forth between characters, the pastiche, the Irish history, Irish Catholic Church trivia , English language history, weirdo (to me!) word play, and arcane allusions to I don't know what all. And none of this is explained at all. The reader is dumped into it. It's not famous for it's beautiful language!

            Hope that helps - I'd go ahead and give it a try - follow a summary guide, don't try for all the allusions or you'll quit by page 20. If it's over your head just keep reading - like Faulkner only different - and harder because the native language is not American English - it's older Irish.

            Bekah

            >
            > Sent from my iPhone
            >
            > On Jun 16, 2013, at 10:41 AM, "Bekah" <bekah0176@...> wrote:
            >
            >> On Jun 15, 2013, at 1:06 PM, jeffrey jackson <jjack7@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> > Instead I nominate Ulysses by Joyce.
            >> > It's been on my shelf for over 10 years and I want to tackle it sometime. Jeff.
            >>
            >> Yes, it's Father's Day, but it's also Bloomsday!
            >>
            >> Today marks the anniversary of when James Joyce first "stepped out" with Nora Barnacle, a chambermaid at a local hotel. Later that same year the couple emigrated to Europe and then stayed together the rest of Joyce's life, but not legally marrying until 1931 following the births of two children.
            >>
            >> To honor the date Joyce had Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus take a little Ulysses-like stroll through Dublin on that exact day (June 16, 1904) in the book Ulysses which he's started in 1915 or so. It was published in 1922.
            >>
            >> Joyce was not esteemed in Dublin until much later, but today he is celebrated and Dublin holds a huge annual "Bloomsday" celebration in which many fans walk Bloom's route.
            >>
            >> An excellent day to start reading Ulysses!
            >>
            >> Happy Father's Day James Joyce! :-) - and whomever else here is a father -
            >>
            >> Bekah
            >>
            >
            >
            >

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