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Re: Chick Lit & Chick Flicks

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  • xtontox
    I saw women s issues, along with lightheartedness in Emma. I did not see any empowerment though. Did anyone else? FrankT
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 1, 2009
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      I saw women's issues, along with lightheartedness in Emma. I did not see any empowerment though. Did anyone else?
      FrankT

      --- In crgII@yahoogroups.com, "KarenLibrarian" <ksagun13@...> wrote:
      >
      > I don't know if Jane Austen's works are technically chick lit, since most of that is pretty fluffy and without literary merit. However, a lot of the themes of chick lit, i.e., women's issues and empowerment, are reflected in JA's works -- they are some of the first novels with female protagonists, written by a women, rather lighthearted, etc. I think it's one reason JA's works are so popular. As a librarian, it's always nice to see readers branching out from chick lit into something with a little more substance!
      >
      > However, I'm going to disagree with Jeff about "500 Days of Summer," as a chick flick. To me, a chick flick, like chick lit, is focused on female characters and issues, somethinng like "Bridget Jones' Diary" or "27 Dresses." I loved 500 Days of Summer, but I'd consider it a romance, not a chick flick, since it was all about a guy. Just my humble opinion.
      >
    • KarenLibrarian
      Well, maybe empowerment is just really wishful thinking on my part. But I would say Emma does learn from her mistakes, and grow. She does start treating Miss
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 1, 2009
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        Well, maybe empowerment is just really wishful thinking on my part. But I would say Emma does learn from her mistakes, and grow. She does start treating Miss Bates much more nicely, and Jane Fairfax. I'm not sure about her relationship with Mrs. Elton but she's probably a lost cause.

        Karen

        --- In crgII@yahoogroups.com, "xtontox" <XTONTOX@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > I saw women's issues, along with lightheartedness in Emma. I did not see any empowerment though. Did anyone else?
        > FrankT
        >
        > --- In crgII@yahoogroups.com, "KarenLibrarian" <ksagun13@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I don't know if Jane Austen's works are technically chick lit, since most of that is pretty fluffy and without literary merit. However, a lot of the themes of chick lit, i.e., women's issues and empowerment, are reflected in JA's works -- they are some of the first novels with female protagonists, written by a women, rather lighthearted, etc. I think it's one reason JA's works are so popular. As a librarian, it's always nice to see readers branching out from chick lit into something with a little more substance!
        > >
        > > However, I'm going to disagree with Jeff about "500 Days of Summer," as a chick flick. To me, a chick flick, like chick lit, is focused on female characters and issues, somethinng like "Bridget Jones' Diary" or "27 Dresses." I loved 500 Days of Summer, but I'd consider it a romance, not a chick flick, since it was all about a guy. Just my humble opinion.
        > >
        >
      • xtontox
        I agree Emma learns from her mistakes, and grows; for me, that s what made it a good story. Mrs. Elton is just a total ass. FrankT
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 2, 2009
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          I agree Emma learns from her mistakes, and grows; for me, that's what made it a good story. Mrs. Elton is just a total ass.
          FrankT

          --- In crgII@yahoogroups.com, "KarenLibrarian" <ksagun13@...> wrote:
          >
          > Well, maybe empowerment is just really wishful thinking on my part. But I would say Emma does learn from her mistakes, and grow. She does start treating Miss Bates much more nicely, and Jane Fairfax. I'm not sure about her relationship with Mrs. Elton but she's probably a lost cause.
          >
          > Karen
          >
          > --- In crgII@yahoogroups.com, "xtontox" <XTONTOX@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > I saw women's issues, along with lightheartedness in Emma. I did not see any empowerment though. Did anyone else?
          > > FrankT
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