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Re: [crgII] Re: Brief summary of Emile Zola

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  • marion
    Good to see you :) I thought I might be all on my own with this one, even though the book got through the polls. I think TR s a good intro. to Zola s work, as
    Message 1 of 31 , Mar 1 12:46 AM
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      Good to see you :) I thought I might be all on my own with this one,
      even though the book got through the polls.

      I think TR's a good intro. to Zola's work, as it's relatively
      straight forward, and nice and short. I won't say I hope you enjoy
      it, as 'enjoy' isn't perhaps a word that sits too happily with Zola's
      books; they're all pretty tough.

      I belonged to Dagny's French Literature group for about ten years,
      so've read some of the better known of the Rougon-Macquart novels.

      As Zola believed heredity (+ environment, to a lesser degree), acted
      like Fate in people's lives, his characters are often pretty much
      doomed by who their parents happen to be.

      In our novel we learn that the one of the female principal
      characters, Therese, (apologies for lack of accents) has the
      misfortune to be the product of an illegitimate (probably) liaison
      between an army captain and an Algerian woman - not a good start in
      life from Zola's pov. And immediately she's put into bed (the sick
      bed) of her first cousin Camille by her well-meaning aunt.

      Oh dear. :)

      Best,

      Marion

      On 1 Mar 2009, at 03:35, blueviolets27 wrote:

      > Marion, thanks for the background info. Very interesting glimpse into
      > his life. I have never read any thing by Zola, so I am looking
      > forward to reading this novel with you and the group.
      >
    • J. F.K.
      I am sorry, but I read a German translation. Johanna The solitude of the king on his throne and the prisoner in his cell differs in character and degree, but
      Message 31 of 31 , Mar 4 9:26 AM
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        I am sorry, but I read a German translation.
        Johanna

        The solitude of the king on his throne and the prisoner in his cell differs in character and degree, but it is solitude nevertheless.-Elizabeth Cady Stanton
        RR:
        Sally G. McMillen: Seneca Falls
        Wilhelm Hauff: Das Wirtshaus im Spessart
        Daniele Del Giudice: Das Land vom Meer aus gesehen
        Hilde Schmölzer: Revolte der Frauen
        Ford Madox Ford: The Good Soldier

        --- perfectgrace723 <kendaldavidburgess@...> schrieb am Di, 3.3.2009:
        Von: perfectgrace723 <kendaldavidburgess@...>
        Betreff: [crgII] Re: Therese Raquin pronunciation.
        An: crgII@yahoogroups.com
        Datum: Dienstag, 3. März 2009, 22:25

        --- In crgII@yahoogroups. com, "J. F.K." <aquila_muscas_ captat@.. .> wrote:
        >
        Johanna,
        I was curious which version you have. I mentioned before I am
        reading an etext, which has the Vizetelly foreword. But I would
        be interested in reading another, for more info.

        Andrea

        > I have started with Therese Raquin. Does everybody have Zola's  forword in there? I
        found this one quite interesting. It is an explanantion of his intent, as the work had been
        considered filth.
        > Johanna
        >
        > The solitude of the king on his throne and the prisoner in his cell differs in character
        and degree, but it is solitude nevertheless. -Elizabeth Cady Stanton
        > RR:
        > Sally G. McMillen: Seneca Falls
        > Wilhelm Hauff: Das Wirtshaus im Spessart
        > Daniele Del Giudice: Das Land vom Meer aus gesehen
        > Hilde Schmölzer: Revolte der Frauen
        > Ford Madox Ford: The Good Soldier
        >
        > --- marion <at.hazard@. ..> schrieb am Di, 3.3.2009:
        >
        > Von: marion <at.hazard@. ..>
        > Betreff: Re: [crgII] Therese Raquin pronunciation.
        > An: crgII@yahoogroups. com
        > Datum: Dienstag, 3. März 2009, 14:24
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Here's an amusing site which gives French pronunciations - never come across it before.
        It actually has our heroine's name under T. No Raquin though. Perhaps the nearest word is
        radin, which, I've just learned, means stingy.
        >
        >
        > Have fun. 
        > Marion
        >
        >
        >
        > http://french. about.com/ library/pronunci ation/bl- audiodico- t.htm
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > On 3 Mar 2009, at 10:00, vaughan jackson wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Tearaze ruhkahn, por que non? (Therese Raquin)
        >  
        > Vis a vis, 
        >
        > Arture Rumbow (Arthur Rimbaud).
        >  
        > Vaughan (Vorn).
        > -
        >


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