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Re: [creat] how can theistic evolutionists reconcile a biblical worldview?

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  • Dave Oldridge
    ... Genesis 1 and the first verses of Genesis 2 comprise a polemic against polytheism. The story of the fall that follows is an allegory about the human
    Message 1 of 5 , May 1, 2008
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      On 29 Apr 2008 at 17:24, David Wilson wrote:

      > There is an internet survey on creation vs evolution that I just
      > participated in. I recommend everyone doing it. It is at:
      >  
      > http://app.formassembly.com/forms/view/4648
      >  
      > Anyway, it got me thinking about some Christians who believe
      > that evolution was the way in which God brought about all life.
      > They can accept creation story in Genesis as poetic literature
      > and so that does not pose a problem for them. But the account in
      > Genesis appears to be historical narrative from Genesis 3 at
      > least ... so where is the cutoff point? That is, if the first
      > chapters are poetic, does that mean that everything crumbles for
      > a biblical worldview? So, if Eden is figurative, then so is the
      > fall, Noah, and does that not keep going so that even the
      > account of Abraham from Gen 11 & 12 is figurative? Where is the
      > cutoff so that a worldview can be maintained for these
      > Christians? I am very interested if anyone has some dialogue on
      > this issue.

      Genesis 1 and the first verses of Genesis 2 comprise a polemic
      against polytheism. The story of the fall that follows is an
      allegory about the human condition. Everything up to and
      including the flood and the story of the Tower of Babel are
      borrowed myths taken from Sumerian and Babylonian mythology.

      Abraham may or may not be a mythic figure, but the story of the
      Hebrew tribes begins with his story.

      Orthodox Christian theology does not depend on any theory of
      Biblical inerrancy. And that theology, the decision as to what
      constitutes true doctrine or false, rests with the Church, not
      with some individual's interpretation of ancient literature,
      however holy or inspired.


      --

      Dave Oldridge
      ICQ 1800667
      VA7CZ
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