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Re: Long post for Randy :)

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  • Vince
    ... own ... you ... While I am truly a layman in the world of genetics and evolution, I AM an expert on the Pentateuch. Very few biblical scholars believe
    Message 1 of 58 , Jan 1, 2005
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      > Blah blah blah blah blah. If these things are false, it only shows
      > that the
      > contemporaries of those who wrote the New Testament believed some
      > false things.
      > Gosh. That would make them HUMAN!
      >
      > A: I know. It doesn't matter what the Bible says. You write your
      own
      > version so you believe whatever you want.
      >
      > Moses may have written some parts of it, but there is no real
      > evidence to support
      > that contention.
      >
      > A: There are huge amount of support that Moses was the writer. But
      > what you believe what you want anyway, so waht does it matter to
      you
      > what the Bible says? It says for instance:

      While I am truly a layman in the world of genetics and evolution, I
      AM an expert on the Pentateuch. Very few biblical scholars believe
      Moses wrote the first five books. He was thought to be the author as
      a result of a mistranlation of some of Josephus' work. I wrote a
      paper regarding this issue some time ago, and will paste it here.
      It's short. I'd be happy to answer any other questions regarding the
      Pentateuch.

      "It has long been recognized that there were a few problems with the
      traditional view of Moses as author. The text reports the death of
      Moses--how could Moses have written of his own death? It also
      describes Moses as "the most humble man who ever lived"--how could
      Moses write that about himself? But these are minor issues. Some say
      Moses' successor Joshua wrote the few lines that describe the death
      of Moses; others say that Moses himself was commanded to write that
      text before it happened. None of this represents a serious challenge
      to Mosaic authorship.

      As time went on, however, scholars became increasingly skeptical of
      the idea of Moses as single author. Among their objections:

      Several stories are repeated, with different characters or different
      emphasis (called "doublets"). For instance, there are two creation
      stories (Gen 1 and Gen 2). There are three stories of a patriarch
      traveling among pagans and pretending his wife is his sister. There
      are two stories of Moses striking a rock to produce water. There are
      two versions of the Ten Commandments (one in Exodus, one that Moses
      recaps in Deuteronomy) with slightly different wording. There are, in
      fact, a lot of these doublets.
      There are internal inconsistencies. The number of days of the Flood
      story don't add up right. At one point, Noah takes two of each
      animal; at another point, he takes two of some, seven of others.
      Joseph is sold into slavery to Ishmaelites in one verse, to
      Midianites a few verses later. The Mountain of Revelation is
      sometimes called Sinai and sometimes Horeb. Moses' father-in-law is
      sometimes called Yitro and sometimes Ruel, and so on."
    • Vince
      ... own ... you ... While I am truly a layman in the world of genetics and evolution, I AM an expert on the Pentateuch. Very few biblical scholars believe
      Message 58 of 58 , Jan 1, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        > Blah blah blah blah blah. If these things are false, it only shows
        > that the
        > contemporaries of those who wrote the New Testament believed some
        > false things.
        > Gosh. That would make them HUMAN!
        >
        > A: I know. It doesn't matter what the Bible says. You write your
        own
        > version so you believe whatever you want.
        >
        > Moses may have written some parts of it, but there is no real
        > evidence to support
        > that contention.
        >
        > A: There are huge amount of support that Moses was the writer. But
        > what you believe what you want anyway, so waht does it matter to
        you
        > what the Bible says? It says for instance:

        While I am truly a layman in the world of genetics and evolution, I
        AM an expert on the Pentateuch. Very few biblical scholars believe
        Moses wrote the first five books. He was thought to be the author as
        a result of a mistranlation of some of Josephus' work. I wrote a
        paper regarding this issue some time ago, and will paste it here.
        It's short. I'd be happy to answer any other questions regarding the
        Pentateuch.

        "It has long been recognized that there were a few problems with the
        traditional view of Moses as author. The text reports the death of
        Moses--how could Moses have written of his own death? It also
        describes Moses as "the most humble man who ever lived"--how could
        Moses write that about himself? But these are minor issues. Some say
        Moses' successor Joshua wrote the few lines that describe the death
        of Moses; others say that Moses himself was commanded to write that
        text before it happened. None of this represents a serious challenge
        to Mosaic authorship.

        As time went on, however, scholars became increasingly skeptical of
        the idea of Moses as single author. Among their objections:

        Several stories are repeated, with different characters or different
        emphasis (called "doublets"). For instance, there are two creation
        stories (Gen 1 and Gen 2). There are three stories of a patriarch
        traveling among pagans and pretending his wife is his sister. There
        are two stories of Moses striking a rock to produce water. There are
        two versions of the Ten Commandments (one in Exodus, one that Moses
        recaps in Deuteronomy) with slightly different wording. There are, in
        fact, a lot of these doublets.
        There are internal inconsistencies. The number of days of the Flood
        story don't add up right. At one point, Noah takes two of each
        animal; at another point, he takes two of some, seven of others.
        Joseph is sold into slavery to Ishmaelites in one verse, to
        Midianites a few verses later. The Mountain of Revelation is
        sometimes called Sinai and sometimes Horeb. Moses' father-in-law is
        sometimes called Yitro and sometimes Ruel, and so on."
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