Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: A TN county fails to adopt bio-books

Expand Messages
  • tinroad66
    ... Tin: I hope Tennessee finds a book that gives the full range of pseudo scientific theories not just creationism, but geocentrism, alien abduction,
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 7, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In creationevolutiondebate@yahoogroups.com, Susan Cogan <susan-
      brassfield@o...> wrote:
      > Apparently Tennessee has not heard of the all the Supreme Court
      > rulings in the last 20 years that prohibit teaching creationism in
      > public schools. And they have the gall to get mad when people call
      > them ignorant!!!
      >
      > Susan
      >
      > ---------------

      Tin: I hope Tennessee finds a book that gives the full range of
      pseudo scientific theories not just creationism, but geocentrism,
      alien abduction, trephining, psychics, astrology and alchemy. If we
      do this let's do a complete job.
      >
      >
      > A Tennessee county board of education has voted not to
      > adopt three biology textbooks because they do not
      > address creationism.
      >
      > The full story as reported in The daily Times of Maryville,
      > TN can currently be accessed at
      > http://www.thedailytimes.com/sited/story/html/127192
      > *********
      > Creationism vs. evolution
      > central debate behind rejection
      > of textbooks
      > 2003-04-05
      > by Erin Hudson
      > of The Daily Times Staff
      >
      > The Blount County Board of Education denied the adoption of three
      new biology
      > textbooks because they teach evolution but do not cover creationism.
      >
      > The vote to deny the texts passed by a 2-1 margin Thursday night.
      Four board
      > members did not vote.
      >
      > The three textbooks in question were not among the 37 science,
      > consumer science,
      > wellness and agriculture books adopted by the board.
      >
      > Board members Mike Treadway and Jean Simerly voted to deny the
      texts and Don
      > McNelly voted to approve them.
      >
      > Board members Charles Finley, Bill Padgett, William ``Booty''
      Miller and Don
      > Talbott did not participate in the vote.
      >
      > Treadway said he had reservations about the approach to the theory
      of
      > evolution in
      > the three texts. He said he does not want people to believe he is
      > against evolution,
      > but wants it to be taught as a theory along with creationism.
      >
      > ``With the overwhelming references to evolution, I don't feel
      comfortable with
      > (adopting these texts),'' Treadway said.
      >
      > Simerly said she is concerned with how evolution is approached in
      the selected
      > biology texts, because creationism is not addressed.
      >
      > ``I do not believe that we evolved from anything other than human
      beings,'' she
      > said.
      >
      > McNelly said he shared those concerns, though he is not against
      evolution as a
      > theory. Like Treadway, he said he believes students should be
      taught
      > both creation
      > and evolution theories.
      >
      > ``With creationism not presented as a theory, there's a large
      gaping
      > hole in the
      > books,'' McNelly said.
      >
      > McNelly said he voted against the motion to reject the textbooks
      because he
      > believes the teachers could address creationism when covering the
      material in
      > class.
      >
      > Technology supervisor Brian Bell, who is charged with assisting
      teachers in
      > selecting new textbooks, said these three particular texts were
      those
      > selected by the
      > biology teachers at both high schools. Those texts are also on the
      > state's list of
      > books that can be adopted for use in the schools.
      >
      > ``The theory of evolution is covered in the Gateway exams, and the
      > teachers have
      > to address that,'' Bell told the board Thursday.
      >
      > The current texts used in the biology classes in the county high
      > schools also do not
      > have references to creationism, Bell said Friday.
      >
      > The next course of action would be for the matter to be taken back
      to science
      > instructors at the high schools and have them write a curriculum
      that includes
      > creation being taught beside evolution. With that curriculum in
      > place, the board
      > would be content to adopt the three texts, according to Bell.
      >
      > The four nonvoting board members apparently were reluctant to get
      > involved in the
      > discussion with memories of the Scopes' Monkey Trial in the not so
      > distant past.
      > --
      > ---------
      > Check out an excerpt of my recently published historical
      novel "Jubilee":
      > http://members.cox.net/sbcogan/
    • piasan@aol.com
      In a message dated 4/7/03 11:04:08 AM Central Daylight Time, ... Pi: Funny thing... they comment at the end of the article that the Scopes trial (1925) in the
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 7, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        In a message dated 4/7/03 11:04:08 AM Central Daylight Time,
        susan-brassfield@... writes:

        > Apparently Tennessee has not heard of the all the Supreme Court
        > rulings in the last 20 years that prohibit teaching creationism in
        > public schools. And they have the gall to get mad when people call
        > them ignorant!!!
        >
        >

        Pi:
        Funny thing... they comment at the end of the article that the Scopes trial
        (1925) in the "not so distant past". Scopes was probably before their
        fathers were born.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael Tong
        Susan: A Tennessee county board of education has voted not to adopt three biology textbooks because they do not address creationism. The full story as reported
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 12, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Susan: A Tennessee county board of education has voted not to
          adopt three biology textbooks because they do not
          address creationism.

          The full story as reported in The daily Times of Maryville,
          TN can currently be accessed at
          http://www.thedailytimes.com/sited/story/html/127192
          *********

          Michael: Notice that the board members objecting to the textbooks simply
          wanted creationism included; they do not object to the teaching of
          evolution. In the light of studies showing that prayer and religious
          faith could have health benefits, there should be no objections. If
          evolution is a fact, every logical person would believe it.

          Yours truly,
          Michael
        • tinroad66
          ... simply ... Tin: Creationism is not science, thus it should not be taught as if it were science. they do not object to the teaching of ... religious ...
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 12, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In creationevolutiondebate@yahoogroups.com, Michael Tong
            <mtong5@j...> wrote:
            > Susan: A Tennessee county board of education has voted not to
            > adopt three biology textbooks because they do not
            > address creationism.
            >
            > The full story as reported in The daily Times of Maryville,
            > TN can currently be accessed at
            > http://www.thedailytimes.com/sited/story/html/127192
            > *********
            >
            > Michael: Notice that the board members objecting to the textbooks
            simply
            > wanted creationism included;

            Tin: Creationism is not science, thus it should not be taught as if
            it were science.



            they do not object to the teaching of
            > evolution. In the light of studies showing that prayer and
            religious
            > faith could have health benefits,

            Tin: As do meditation, breathing techniques and biofeedback.




            there should be no objections. If
            > evolution is a fact, every logical person would believe it.
            >

            Tin: But if you ask these people if they are trying to promote their
            religion they say "no". Fibbers.
          • Susan Cogan
            ... Evolution *is* a fact and every logical person *does* believe it. Teaching creation in schools would be teaching Biblical literalist Bible study by a
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 12, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              At 02:34 PM 4/12/03 -0700, you wrote:
              >Susan: A Tennessee county board of education has voted not to
              >adopt three biology textbooks because they do not
              >address creationism.
              >
              >The full story as reported in The daily Times of Maryville,
              >TN can currently be accessed at
              >http://www.thedailytimes.com/sited/story/html/127192
              >*********
              >
              >Michael: Notice that the board members objecting to the textbooks simply
              >wanted creationism included; they do not object to the teaching of
              >evolution. In the light of studies showing that prayer and religious
              >faith could have health benefits, there should be no objections. If
              >evolution is a fact, every logical person would believe it.

              Evolution *is* a fact and every logical person *does* believe it.

              Teaching creation in schools would be teaching Biblical literalist Bible
              study by a government entity. It would not even be teaching mainstream
              Christianity in public schools. It would be teaching a single, narrow
              interpretation of the Bible. The government is not allowed to promote the
              teachings of one religion over all the others and if they taught the
              creation myths of religions from all over the world there would be no time
              to actually teach science.

              Susan

              ------
              Check out an excerpt of my newly published novel "Jubilee"
              http://members.cox.net/sbcogan/
            • Michael Tong
              they do not object to the teaching of ... religious ... Tin: As do meditation, breathing techniques and biofeedback. Michael: Provide a study to support this.
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 18, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                they do not object to the teaching of
                > evolution. In the light of studies showing that prayer and
                religious
                > faith could have health benefits,

                Tin: As do meditation, breathing techniques and biofeedback.

                Michael: Provide a study to support this.

                >Michael: Notice that the board members objecting to the textbooks simply
                >wanted creationism included; they do not object to the teaching of
                >evolution. In the light of studies showing that prayer and religious
                >faith could have health benefits, there should be no objections. If
                >evolution is a fact, every logical person would believe it.

                Susan: Evolution *is* a fact and every logical person *does* believe it.

                Teaching creation in schools would be teaching Biblical literalist Bible
                study by a government entity. It would not even be teaching mainstream
                Christianity in public schools. It would be teaching a single, narrow
                interpretation of the Bible. The government is not allowed to promote the

                teachings of one religion over all the others and if they taught the
                creation myths of religions from all over the world there would be no
                time
                to actually teach science.

                Michael: Teaching Biblical creationism would be; teaching ID wouldn't be.

                Yours truly,
                Michael
              • tinroad66
                ... Tin: ok Agras, W. S., Southam, M. A., & Taylor, C. B. (1983). Long-term persistence of relaxation-induced blood pressure lowering during the working day.
                Message 7 of 11 , Apr 20, 2003
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- In creationevolutiondebate@yahoogroups.com, Michael Tong
                  <mtong5@j...> wrote:
                  > they do not object to the teaching of
                  > > evolution. In the light of studies showing that prayer and
                  > religious
                  > > faith could have health benefits,
                  >
                  > Tin: As do meditation, breathing techniques and biofeedback.
                  >
                  > Michael: Provide a study to support this.

                  Tin: ok

                  Agras, W. S., Southam, M. A., & Taylor, C. B. (1983). Long-term
                  persistence of relaxation-induced blood pressure lowering during the
                  working day. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 51, 792-
                  794.
                  Aivazyan, T. A., Zaitsev, V. P., Salenko, B. B., Yurenev, A. P., &
                  Patrusheva, I. F. (1988). Efficacy of relaxation techniques in
                  hypertensive patients: Fifth joint USA-USSR symposium on arterial
                  hypertension. Health Psychology, 7(Suppl.), 193-200.
                  Andreoli, A., Casolari, L., & Rigatelli, M. (1995). Expressive
                  relaxation training and anxiety disorders. New Trends in Experimental
                  and Clinical Psychiatry, 11, 123-129.
                  Aponte, J. F., & Aponte, C. E. (1971). Group programmed
                  desensitization without the simultaneous presentation of aversive
                  scenes with relaxation training. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 9,
                  337-346.
                  Balick, L., Elfner, L., May, J., & Moore, J. D. (1982). Biofeedback
                  treatment of dysmenorrhea. Biofeedback and Self-Regulation, 7, 499-
                  520.
                  Barlow, D. H. (1988). Anxiety and its disorders: The nature and
                  treatment Of anxiety and panic. New York: Guilford Press.
                  Beck, A. T. (1988). Cognitive approaches to panic disorder: Theory
                  and therapy. In S. Rachman & J. D. Maser (Eds.), Panic:
                  Psychological perspectives. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
                  Benson, H. (1975). The relaxation response (1st ed.). New York:
                  Morrow.
                  Benson, H. (1983). The relaxation response and norepinephrine: A new
                  study illuminates mechanisms. Integrative Psychiatry, 1, 15-18.
                  Bernstein, D. A., & Borkovec, T. D. (1973). Progressive relaxation
                  training. Champaign, IL: Research Press.
                  Blanchard, E. B., & Schwarz, S. P. (1988). Two-year follow-up of
                  behavioral treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Behaviour Therapy,
                  19, 67-73.
                  Blanchard, E. B., Ahles, T. A., & Shaw, E. R. (1979). Behavioral
                  treatment of headaches. In M. Hersen, R. M. Eisler, & P. M. Miller
                  (Eds.), Progress in behavior modification (Vol. 8). New York:
                  Academic Press.
                  Blanchard, E. B., Khramelashvili, V. V., McCoy, G. C., Aivazyan, T.
                  A., McCaffrey, R. J., Salenko, B. B., Musso, A., Wittrock, D. A.,
                  Berger, M., Gerardi, M. A., & Pangburn, L. (1988). The USA-USSR
                  collaborative cross-cultural comparison of autogenic training and
                  thermal biofeedback in the treatment of mild-hypertension. Health
                  Psychology, 7 (Suppl.), 175-192.
                  Blanchard, E. B., Appelbaum, R. A., Radnitz, C. L., Michultka, D.,
                  Morrill, B., Kirsch, C., Hillhouse, J., Evans, D. D., Guarnieri, P.,
                  Attanasio, V., Andrasik, F., Jaccard, J., & Dentineer, M. P. (1990).
                  Placebo-controlled evaluation of abbreviated progressive muscle
                  relaxation and of relaxation combined with cognitive therapy in the
                  treatment of tension headache. Journal of Consulting and Clinical
                  Psychology, 58, 210-215.
                  Blanchard, E. B., Greene, B., Scharff, L., & Schwarz-McMorris, S.P.
                  (1993). Relaxation training as a treatment for irritable bowel
                  syndrome. Biofeedback and Self Regulation, 18, 125-132.
                  Borgeat, F., Stravynski, A., & Chaloult, L. (1983). The influence of
                  two different sets of information and suggestions on the subjective
                  effects of relaxation. Journal of Human Stress, 9, 40-45.
                  Borkovec, T. D. (1979). Pseudo- (experimental) insomnia and
                  idiopathic (objective) insomnia: Theoretical and therapeutic issues.
                  Advances in Behaviour Research and Therapy, 2, 27-55.
                  Borkovec, T. D. & Costello, E. (1993). Efficacy of applied
                  relaxation and cognitive-behavioral therapy in the treatment of
                  generalized anxiety disorder. Journal of Consulting and Clinical
                  Psychology, 61(4): 611-619.
                  Borkovec, T. D. & Grayson, J. B. (1980). Consequences of increasing
                  the functional impact of internal emotional stimuli. In K.
                  Blankstein, P. Pliner, & J. Polivy (Eds.), Assessment and
                  modification of emotional behavior. New York: Plenum.
                  Borkovec, T. D., & Sides, K. (1979). Critical procedural variables
                  related to the physiological effects of progressive relaxation: A
                  review. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 17, 119-126.
                  Borkovec, T. D., Mathews, A. M., Chambers, A., Ebrahimi, S., Lytle,
                  R., & Nelson, R. (1987). The effects of relaxation training with
                  cognitive or nondirective therapy and the role of relaxation-induced
                  anxiety in the treatment of generalized anxiety. Journal of
                  Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 55, 883-888.
                  Buckelew, S. P., Conway, R., Parker, J., Deuser, W. E., Read, J.,
                  Witty, T. E., Hewett, J. E., Minor, M., Johnson, J. C., Van-Male, L.,
                  McIntosh, M. J., Nigh, M., & Kay, D. R. (1998).
                  Biofeedback/relaxation training and exercise interventions for
                  fibromyalgia: A prospective trial. Arthritis Care and Research, 11,
                  196-209.
                  Cannici, J., Malcolm, R., & Peek, L. A. (1983). Treatment of
                  insomnia in cancer patients using muscle relaxation training.
                  Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 14, 251-256.
                  Carey, M. P., & Burish, T. G. (1987). Providing relaxation training
                  to cancer chemotherapy patients: A comparison of three delivery
                  techniques. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 55, 732-
                  737.
                  Carrington, P., Collings, G. H., Jr., Benson, H., Robinson, H., Wood,
                  L. W., Lehrer, P. M., Woolfolk, R. L., & Cole, J. W. (1980). The use
                  of meditation-relaxation techniques for the management of stress in a
                  working population. Journal of Occupational Medicine, 22, 221-231.
                  Chang-Liang, R., & Denney, D. R. (1976). Applied relaxation as
                  training in self control. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 23, 183-
                  189.
                  Clark, D. M. (1986). A cognitive approach to panic. Behaviour
                  Research and Therapy, 24, 461-470.
                  Clark, D. M., Salkovskis, P. M., & Chalkley, A. J. (1985).
                  Respiratory control as a treatment for panic attacks. Journal of
                  Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 16, 23-30.
                  Clum, G, A., Clum, G. A., & Surls, R. (1993). A meta-analysis of
                  treatments for panic disorder. Journal of Consulting and Clinical
                  Psychology, 61(2): 317-326.
                  Cooke, G. (1968). Evaluation of the efficacy of the components of
                  reciprocal inhibition psychotherapy. Journal of Abnormal Psychology,
                  73, 464-467.
                  Cox, B. J., Norton, G. R., Swinson, R. P., & Endler, N. S. 1990).
                  Substance abuse and panic-related anxiety: A critical review.
                  Behaviour Research and Therapy, 28, 385-393.
                  Dath, N. N. S., Mishra, H., Kumaraiah, V., & Yavagal, S. T. (1997).
                  Behavioural approach to coronary heart disease. Journal of
                  Personality and Clinical Studies, 13(1-2): 29-33.
                  Davidson, R. J., & Schwartz, G. E. (1976). Psychobiology of
                  relaxation and related states. In D. Mostofsky (Ed.), Behavior
                  modification and control of physiological activity. Engelwood
                  Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
                  Deffenbacher, J. L., & Suinn, R. M. (1982). The chronically anxious
                  patient. In D. M. Doleys, R. L. Meredith, & A. R. Ciminero (Eds.),
                  Behavioral medicine: Assessment and treatment strategies. New York:
                  Plenum Press.
                  Deffenbacher, J. L., & Suinn, R. (1987). Generalized anxiety
                  syndrome. In L. Michelson & L. M. Ascher (Eds.), Anxiety and stress
                  disorders: Cognitive-behavioral assessment and treatment. New York:
                  Guilford Press.
                  Deffenbacher, J. L., McNamara, K., Stark, R. S., & Sabadell, P. M.
                  (1990). A combination of cognitive, relaxation, and behavioral
                  coping skills in the reduction of general anger. Journal of College
                  Student Development, 31, 351-358.
                  Deffenbacher, J. L. & Stark, R. (1992). Relaxation and cognitive
                  relaxation treatments of general anger. Journal of Counseling
                  Psychology, 39, 158-167.
                  Delmonte, M. M. (1984). Electrocortical activity and related
                  phenomena associated with meditation practice: A literature review.
                  International Journal of Neuroscience, 24, 217-231.
                  Eller, L. S. (1995). Effects of two cognitive-behavioral
                  interventions on immunity and symptoms in persons with HIV. Annals of
                  Behavioral Medicine, 17, 339-348.
                  English, E. H., & Baker, T. B. (1983). Relaxation training and
                  cardiovascular response to experimental stressors. Health
                  Psychology, 2, 239-259.
                  Franklin, J. A. (1986). Isometric relaxation. Australian
                  Psychologist, 21, 413-425.
                  Franklin, J. A. (1989). 6 year follow up of the effectiveness of
                  respiratory retraining, in situ isometric relaxation, and cognitive
                  modification in the treatment of agoraphobia. Behavior Modification,
                  13, 139-167.
                  Freedman, R. R. (1989). Quantitative measurements of finger blood
                  flow during behavioral treatments of Raynaud's disease.
                  Psychophysiology, 26, 437-441.
                  Freedman, R. R. (1991). Physiological mechanisms of temperature
                  biofeedback. Biofeedback and Self-Regulation, 16, 95-116.
                  Freedman, R. R., & Ianni, P. (1983). Self-control of digital
                  temperature: Physiological factors and transfer effects.
                  Psychophysiology, 20, 682-679.
                  Freedman, R., Ianni, P., & Wenig, P. (1983). Behavioral treatment of
                  Raynaud's disease. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology,
                  51, 539-549.
                  Freedman, R. R., Sabharwal, S. C., Ianni, P., Desai, N., Wenig, P., &
                  Mayes, M. (1988). Nonneural beta-adrenergic vasodilating mechanism
                  in temperature biofeedback. Psychosomatic Medicine, 50, 394-401.
                  Freeling, N. W., & Sheinberg, K. M. (1970). The alleviation of test
                  anxiety by systematic desensitization. Behaviour Research and
                  Therapy, 8, 293-299.
                  Girdano, D. A., Everly, G. S., & Dusek, D. E. (1990). Controlling
                  stress and tension: A holistic approach. Englewood Cliffs, NJ:
                  Prentice-Hall.
                  Glasgow, M. S., Engel, B. T., & D'Lugoff, B. C. (1989). A controlled
                  study of a standardized behavioral stepped treatment for
                  hypertension. Psychosomatic Medicine, 51, 10-26.
                  Goldfried, M. R., & Trier, C. S. (1974). Effectiveness of relaxation
                  as an active coping skill. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 83, 348-
                  355.
                  Greeff, A. P. & Conradie, W. S. (1998). Use of progressive
                  relaxation training for chronic alcoholics with insomnia.
                  Psychological Reports, 82(2): 407-412.
                  Greenwood, M. M., & Benson, H. (1977). The efficacy of progressive
                  relaxation in systematic desensitization and a proposal for an
                  alternative competitive response. Behaviour Research and Therapy,
                  15, 337-343.
                  Grimm, L. G. (1980). The evidence for cue-controlled relaxation.
                  Behavior Therapy, 11, 283-293.
                  Gustafson, R. (1992). Treating insomnia with a self-administered
                  muscle relaxation training program: A follow-up. Psychological
                  Reports, 70,
                  124-126.
                  Hahn, Y., Ro, Y., Song, H., & Kim, N. (1993). The effect of thermal
                  biofeedback and progressive muscle relaxation training in reducing
                  blood pressure of patients with essential hypertension. Image:
                  Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 25, 204-207.
                  Heide, F. J., & Borkovec, T. D. (1983). Relaxation-induced anxiety:
                  Paradoxical anxiety enhancement due to relaxation training. Journal
                  of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 51, 171-182.
                  Heide, F. J., & Borkovec, T. D. (1984). Relaxation-induced anxiety:
                  Mechanisms and theoretical implications. Behavior, Research and
                  Therapy, 22, 1-12.
                  Heimberg, R. G. (1989). Cognitive and behavioral treatments for
                  social phobia: A Critical analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 9,
                  107-128.
                  Heitkemper, T., Layne, C., Sullivan, & David M. (1993). Brief
                  treatment of children's dental pain and anxiety. Perceptual and Motor
                  Skills, 76(1): 192-194.
                  Hiebert, B., Kirby, B., & Jaknovorian, A. (1989). School-based
                  relaxation: Attempting primary prevention. Canadian journal of
                  Counselling, 23, 273-287.
                  Jacob, R. G., Chesney, M. A., Williams, D. M., Ding, Y., & Shapiro,
                  A. (1991). Relaxation therapy for hypertension: Design effects and
                  treatment effects. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 13, 5-17.
                  Jacob, R. G., Shapiro, A. P., Reeves, R. A., Johnson, A. M.,
                  McDonald, R. H., & Coburn, C. (1986).Relaxation therapy for
                  hypertension: Comparison of effects for concomitant placebo, diuretic
                  and beta-blocker. Archives of Internal Medicine, 146, 2335-2340.
                  Jacobson, E. (1938). Progressive Relaxation. Chicago: Chicago
                  University Press.
                  Kendall, P. C., & Braswell, L. (1986). Medical applications of
                  cognitive behavioral interventions with children. Journal of
                  Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 7, 257-264.
                  King, N. J. (1980). The behavioral management of asthma and asthma-
                  related problems in children: A critical review of the literature.
                  Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 3, 169-189.
                  Kinsman, R. A., Dirks, J. F., Jones, N. F., & Dahlem, N. W. (1980).
                  Anxiety reduction in asthma: Four catches to general application.
                  Psychosomatic Medicine, 42, 397-405.
                  Kluger, M. A., Jamner, L. D., & Tursky, B. (1985). Comparison of the
                  effectiveness of biofeedback and relaxation training on hand
                  warming. Psychophysiology, 22, 162-166.
                  Knapp, T. J., Downs, D. L., & Alperson, J. R. (1976). Behavior
                  therapy for insomnia: A review. Behavior Therapy, 7, 614-625.
                  Koehn, K. A., Burnette, M. M., & Stark, C. (1993). Applied relaxation
                  training in the treatment of genital herpes. Journal of Behavior
                  Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 24, 331-341.
                  Kokoszka, A. (1990). Axiological aspects of comparing psychotherapy
                  and meditation. International Journal of Psychosomatics, 37, 78-81.
                  Kotses, H. (1998). Emotional precipitants of asthma. In H. Kotses,
                  A. Harver (Eds.): Self-management of asthma. Lung biology in health
                  and disease. New York,: Marcel Dekker.
                  Kotses, H., Harver, A., Segreto, J., Glans, K. D., Creer, T. L., &
                  Young, G. A. (1991). Long-term effects of biofeedback-induced facial
                  relaxation on measures of asthma severity in children. Biofeedback
                  and Self-Regulation, 16, 1-22.
                  Kushner, M., Sher, K., & Beitnian, B. (1990). The relation between
                  alcohol problems and the anxiety disorders. American Journal of
                  Psychiatry, 147, 685-695.
                  Lacks, P. (1987). Behavioral treatment for persistent insomnia.
                  Elmsford, NY: Pergamon Press.
                  Lazarus, A. A. (1965). A preliminary report in the use of directed
                  muscular activity in counter-conditioning. Behavior, Research and
                  Therapy, 2, 301-303.
                  Lazarus, A. A. & Mayne, T. J. (1965). Relaxation: Some limitations,
                  side effects, and proposed solutions. Psychotherapy, 27, 261-266.
                  Lehrer, P. M. (1978). Psychophysiological effects of progressive
                  relaxation in anxiety neurotic patients and of progressive relaxation
                  and alpha feedback in nonpatients. Journal of Consulting and
                  Clinical Psychology, 46, 389-404.
                  Lehrer, P. M. (1982). How to relax and how not to relax: A re-
                  evaluation of the work of Edmund Jacobson. Behaviour Research and
                  Therapy, 20, 417-428.
                  Lehrer, P. M., & Woolfolk, R. L. (1984). Are stress reduction
                  techniques interchangeable, or do they have specific effects?: A
                  review of the comparative empirical literature. In R. L. Woolfolk &
                  P. M. Lehrer (Eds.), Principles and practice of stress management
                  (1st ed.). New York: Guilford Press.
                  Lehrer, P. M., & Woolfolk, R. L. (Eds.)(1993). Principles and
                  practice of stress management (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.
                  Lehrer, P. M., Atthowe, J. M., & Weber, E. S. P. (1980). Effects of
                  progressive relaxation and autogenic training on anxiety and
                  physiological measures, with some data on hypnotizability. In F. J.
                  McGuigan, W. Sime, & J. M. Wallace (Eds.), Stress and tension
                  control. New York: Plenum.
                  Lehrer, P. M., Woolfolk, R. L., & Goldman, N. (1986). Progressive
                  relaxation then and now: Does change always mean progress? In R.
                  Davidson, G. E. Schwartz, & D. Shapiro (Eds.), Consciousness and self-
                  regulation (Vol. 4). New York: Plenum Press.
                  Lekander, M., Fuerst, C.J., Rostein, S., Hursti, T.J., & Fredrickson,
                  M. (1997). Immune effects of relaxation during chemotherapy for
                  ovarian cancer. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 66, 195-191.
                  Ley, R. (1988). Panic attacks during relaxation and relaxation-
                  induced anxiety: A hyperventilation interpretation. Journal of
                  Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 19, 253-259.
                  Lisspers, J., & Ost, L. G. (1990). BVP-biofeedback in the treatment
                  of migraine: The effects of constriction and dilation during
                  different phases of the migraine attack. Behavior Modification, 14,
                  200-221.
                  Luthe, W. & Schultz, J. H. (1969). Autogenic training: Medical
                  applications. New York: Grune & Stratton.
                  McGrady, A., Graham, G., & Bailey, B. (1996). Biofeedback-assisted
                  relaxation in insulin-dependent diabetes: A replication and extension
                  study. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 18(3): 185-189.
                  Meichenbaum, D. (1985). Stress inoculation training. New York:
                  Pergamon.
                  Meichenbaum, D. (1993). Stress inoculation training: A 20-year
                  update. In P. M. Lehrer & R. L. Woolfolk (Eds.), Principles and
                  practice of stress management (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.
                  Meichenbaum, D. (1996). Stress inoculation training for coping with
                  stressors. The Clinical Psychologist, 49(4), 4-7.
                  Meichenbaum, D., & Novaco, R. (1985). Stress inoculation: A
                  preventative approach. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 7, 419-435.
                  Mehta, M. (1992). Biobehavioral intervention in recurrent headaches
                  in children. Headache Quarterly, 3(4): 426-430.
                  Miller, L. H., Smith, A. D. & Rothstein, L. (1993). The stress
                  solution: An action plan to manage the stress in your life. New York:
                  Pocket Books.
                  Mitchell, K. R., & Mitchell, D. M. (1971). Migraine: An exploratory
                  treatment application of programmed behavior therapy techniques.
                  Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 15, 137-157.
                  Moore, N. (1965). Behavior therapy with bronchial asthma: A
                  controlled study. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 9, 257-274.
                  Morrow, G. R. (1986). Effect of the cognitive hierarchy in the
                  systematic desensitization treatment of anticipatory nausea in cancer
                  patients: A component comparison with relaxation only, counseling,
                  and no treatment. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 10, 421-446.
                  Murphy, A. L, Lehrer, P. M., & Jurish, S. (1990). Cognitive coping
                  skills training and relaxation training as treatments for tension
                  headaches. Behavior Therapy, 21, 89-98.
                  Neff, D. F., & Blanchard, E. B. (1987). A multi-component treatment
                  for irritable bowel syndrome. Behavior Therapy, 18, 70-83.
                  Norton, G. R., Rhodes, L., Hauch, J., & Kaprowy, E. A. (1985).
                  Characteristics of subjects experiencing relaxation and relaxation-
                  induced anxiety. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental
                  Psychiatry, 16, 211-216.
                  Novaco, R. W. (1975). Anger control: The development and evaluation
                  of an experimental treatment. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath.
                  Oest, L.G., & Westling, B.E. (1995). Applied relaxation vs cognitive
                  behavior therapy in the treatment of panic disorder. Behaviour
                  Research and Therapy, 33, 145-158.
                  Omizo, M. M., & Williams, R. E. (1982). Biofeedback-induced
                  relaxation training as an alternative for the elementary school
                  learning-disabled child. Biofeedback and Self-Regulation, 7, 139-
                  148.
                  Parker, J. C., & Gilbert, G. (1978). Anxiety management in
                  alcoholics: A study of generalized effects of relaxation techniques.
                  Addictive Behaviours, 3, 123-127.
                  Parker, J. C., Gilbert, G. S., & Thoreson, R. W. (1978). Reduction
                  of autonomic arousal in alcoholics: A comparison of relaxation and
                  meditation techniques. Journal of Consulting and Clinical
                  Psychology, 46, 879-886.
                  Patel, C., Marmot, M. G., & Terry, D. J. (1981). Controlled trial of
                  biofeedback-aided behavioral methods in reducing mild hypertension.
                  British Medical journal, 282, 2005-2008.
                  Pinkerton, S., Hughes, H., & Wenrich, W. W. (1982). Behavioral
                  medicine: Clinical applications. New York: Wiley.
                  Primavera, J. P. & Kaiser, R. S., (1992). Non-pharmacological
                  treatment of headache: Is less more? Headache, 32(8): 393-395.
                  Rasid, Z. M. & Parish, T. S. (1998). The effects of two types of
                  relaxation training on students' levels of anxiety. Adolescence, 33
                  (129): 99-101.
                  Richter, N. C. (1984). The efficacy of relaxation training with
                  children. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 12, 319-344.
                  Rose, G. D., & Carlson, J. G. (1987). The behavioral treatment of
                  Raynaud's disease: A review. Biofeedback and Self-Regulation, 12,
                  257-272.
                  Sargent, J., Solbach, P., Coyne, L., Spohn, H., & Sergerson, J.
                  (1986). Results of a controlled, experimental, outcome study of
                  nondrug treatments for the control of migraine headaches. Journal of
                  Behavioral Medicine, 9, 291-323.
                  Sartory, G., Mueller, B., Metsch, J., & Pothmann, R. (1998). A
                  comparison of psychological and pharmacological treatment of
                  pediatric migraine. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 36(12): 1155-
                  1170.
                  Schultz, J. H., & Luthe, W. (1969). Autogenic therapy: Vol. 1.
                  Autogenic methods. New York: Grune & Stratton.
                  Schwartz, G. E., Davidson, R. J., & Goleman, D. T. (1978).
                  Patterning of cognitive and somatic processes in the self-regulation
                  of anxiety: Effects of meditation versus exercise. Psychosomatic
                  Medicine, 40, 321-328.
                  Shapiro, S., & Lehrer, P. M. (1980). Psychophysiological effects of
                  autogenic training and progressive relaxation. Biofeedback and Self-
                  Regulation, 5, 249-255.
                  Sigmon, S. T., & Nelson, R. 0. (1988). The effectiveness of activity
                  scheduling and relaxation training in the treatment of spasmodic
                  dysmenorrhea. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 11, 483-495.
                  Smith, J. C. (1988). Steps toward a cognitive-behavioral model of
                  relaxation. Biofeedback and Self-Regulation, 13, 307-329.
                  Sorbi, M., Tellegen, B., & du Long, A. (1989). Long-term effects of
                  training in relaxation and stress-coping in patients with migraine: A
                  3-year follow-up. Headache, 29, 111-121.
                  Stefanek, M. E., & Hodes, R. L. (1986). Expectancy effects on
                  relaxation instructions: Physiological and self-report indices.
                  Biofeedback and Self-Regulation, 11, 21-29.
                  Suhr, J., Anderson, S., & Tranel, D. (1999). Progressive muscle
                  relaxation in the management of behavioral disturbance in Alzheimer's
                  disease. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 9, 31-44.
                  Suinn, R. M. (1975). Anxiety management training for general
                  anxiety. In R. Suinn & R. Weigel (Eds.), The innovative therapies:
                  Creative and critical contributions. New York: Harper & Row.
                  Suinn, R. M. (1990). Anxiety management training: A behavior
                  therapy. New York: Plenum Press.
                  Suinn, R. M., & Richardson, F. C. (1971). Anxiety management
                  training: A nonspecific behavior therapy program for anxiety
                  control. Behavior Therapy, 2, 498-510.
                  Surwit, R. S. (1982). Biofeedback and the behavioral treatment of
                  Raynaud's disease. In L. White & B. Tursky (Eds.), Clinical
                  biofeedback: Efficacy and mechanisms. New York: Guilford Press.
                  Surwit, R. S., Pilon, R. N., & Fenton, C. H. (1978). Behavioral
                  treatment of Raynaud's disease. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 1,
                  323-335.
                  Syrjala, K.L., Donaldson, G.W., Davis, M.W., & Kippes, M.E. (1995).
                  Relaxation and imagery and cognitive- behavioral training reduce pain
                  during cancer treatment: A controlled clinical trial. Pain, 63, 189-
                  198.
                  Taylor, D. N. (1995). Effects of a stress-management program on
                  anxiety, mood, self-esteem, and t-cell count in HIV-positive men.
                  Psychological Reports 76, 451-457.
                  Tobin, D. L., Holroyd, K. A., Baker, A., Reynolds, R. V. C., & Holm,
                  H. (1988). Development and clinical trial of a minimal contact,
                  cognitive-behavioral treatment of tension headache. Cognitive
                  Therapy and Research, 12, 325-339.
                  van Dixhoorn, J. (1998). Cardiorespiratory effects of breathing and
                  relaxation instruction in myocardial infarction patients. Biological
                  Psychology, 49(1-2): 123-135.
                  Vazquez, M. I. & Buceta, J. M. (1993). Effectiveness of self-
                  management programmes and relaxation training in the treatment of
                  bronchial asthma: Relationships with trait anxiety and emotional
                  attack triggers. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 37(1): 71-81.
                  Wallbaum, A.B., Rzewnicki, R., Steele, H., & Suedfeld, P. (1991).
                  Progressive muscle relaxation and restricted environmental
                  stimulation therapy for chronic tension headache: A pilot study.
                  Internationaal Journal of Psychosomatics, 38, 33-39.
                  Weinstein, M. & Smith, J.C. (1992). Isometric squeeze relaxation vs.
                  Meditation: Absorption and focusing as predictors of state effects.
                  Perceptual and Motor Skills, 75,, 1263-1271.
                  Weiten, W. and Lloyd, M. A. (1998). Psychology applied to modern
                  life. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.
                  Whitman, S., Dell, J., Legion, V., & Eibhllyn, A. (1990). Progressive
                  relaxation for seizure reduction. Journal of Epilepsy, 3, 17-22.
                  Wijma, K., Melin, A., Nedstrand, E., & Hammar, M. (1997). Treatment
                  of menopausal symptoms with applied relaxation: A pilot study.
                  Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 28, 251-261.
                  Wynd, C. (1992). Personal power imagery and relaxation techniques
                  used in smoking cessation programs. American Journal of Health
                  Promotion, 6, 184-189.
                  Zaichkowsky, L. B., & Zaichkowsky, L. D. (1984). The effects of a
                  school-based relaxation training program on fourth grade children.
                  Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 13, 81-85.






                  >
                  > >Michael: Notice that the board members objecting to the textbooks
                  simply
                  > >wanted creationism included; they do not object to the teaching of
                  > >evolution. In the light of studies showing that prayer and
                  religious
                  > >faith could have health benefits, there should be no objections.
                  If
                  > >evolution is a fact, every logical person would believe it.
                  >
                  > Susan: Evolution *is* a fact and every logical person *does*
                  believe it.
                  >
                  > Teaching creation in schools would be teaching Biblical literalist
                  Bible
                  > study by a government entity. It would not even be teaching
                  mainstream
                  > Christianity in public schools. It would be teaching a single,
                  narrow
                  > interpretation of the Bible. The government is not allowed to
                  promote the
                  >
                  > teachings of one religion over all the others and if they taught
                  the
                  > creation myths of religions from all over the world there would be
                  no
                  > time
                  > to actually teach science.
                  >
                  > Michael: Teaching Biblical creationism would be; teaching ID
                  wouldn't be.
                  >
                  > Yours truly,
                  > Michael
                • Susan Cogan
                  ... The bottom line for ID is God did it. You are left with the unenviable task of selling the idea that belief in God does not equate to religion. It does.
                  Message 8 of 11 , Apr 21, 2003
                  • 0 Attachment
                    >Susan: Evolution *is* a fact and every logical person *does* believe it.
                    >
                    >Teaching creation in schools would be teaching Biblical literalist Bible
                    >study by a government entity. It would not even be teaching mainstream
                    >Christianity in public schools. It would be teaching a single, narrow
                    >interpretation of the Bible. The government is not allowed to promote the
                    >
                    >teachings of one religion over all the others and if they taught the
                    >creation myths of religions from all over the world there would be no
                    >time to actually teach science.
                    >
                    >Michael: Teaching Biblical creationism would be; teaching ID wouldn't be.

                    The bottom line for ID is "God did it." You are left with the
                    unenviable task of selling the idea that belief in God does not
                    equate to religion. It does. Absolutely nobody is fooled.

                    Susan
                    --
                    ---------
                    Check out an excerpt of my recently published historical novel "Jubilee":
                    http://members.cox.net/sbcogan/
                  • Michael Tong
                    ... Tin: ok Agras, W. S., Southam, M. A., & Taylor, C. B. (1983). Long-term persistence of relaxation-induced blood pressure lowering during the working day.
                    Message 9 of 11 , Apr 25, 2003
                    • 0 Attachment
                      > they do not object to the teaching of
                      > > evolution. In the light of studies showing that prayer and
                      > religious
                      > > faith could have health benefits,
                      >
                      > Tin: As do meditation, breathing techniques and biofeedback.
                      >
                      > Michael: Provide a study to support this.

                      Tin: ok

                      Agras, W. S., Southam, M. A., & Taylor, C. B. (1983). Long-term
                      persistence of relaxation-induced blood pressure lowering during the
                      working day. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 51, 792-
                      794.
                      Aivazyan, T. A., Zaitsev, V. P., Salenko, B. B., Yurenev, A. P., &
                      Patrusheva, I. F. (1988). Efficacy of relaxation techniques in
                      hypertensive patients: Fifth joint USA-USSR symposium on arterial
                      hypertension. Health Psychology, 7(Suppl.), 193-200.
                      Andreoli, A., Casolari, L., & Rigatelli, M. (1995). Expressive
                      relaxation training and anxiety disorders. New Trends in Experimental
                      and Clinical Psychiatry, 11, 123-129.
                      Aponte, J. F., & Aponte, C. E. (1971). Group programmed
                      desensitization without the simultaneous presentation of aversive
                      scenes with relaxation training. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 9,
                      337-346.
                      Balick, L., Elfner, L., May, J., & Moore, J. D. (1982). Biofeedback
                      treatment of dysmenorrhea. Biofeedback and Self-Regulation, 7, 499-
                      520.
                      (Snip)

                      Michael: One does not know whether the above techniques would have
                      benefited those individuals helped by prayer.

                      Pi:
                      We've been over this several times. Since the IDer is, by your own
                      admission, a supernatural agent the, (by definition of the USSC) it is a
                      religious belief. (Ref. Edwards v. Aguillard which has been posted here
                      several times.) As such, it is also (by definition) not suitable for a
                      public school science class. If you want ID taught in theology,
                      philosophy,
                      or comparative religion, that's fine ... but it has no place in biology,
                      physics, astronomy, etc.

                      Michael: Following is an excerpt from
                      www.creationscience.com/onlinebook/FAQ418.html

                      7. “The courts have stated that teaching evidence for creation would
                      violate the separation of church and state.”
                      Response: Wrong. The U.S. Supreme Court said just the opposite. A few
                      evolutionist organizations, the ACLU, and many media outlets have
                      propagated that myth. The Supreme Court actually said that the scientific
                      evidence for any theory of origins, including creation, has always been
                      legal in the classroom. “Moreover, requiring the teaching of creation
                      science with evolution does not give schoolteachers a flexibility that
                      they did not already possess to supplant the present science curriculum
                      with the presentation of theories, besides evolution, about the origin of
                      life.” 2
                      Of course, our issue is whether the evidence against evolution will be
                      taught along with that for evolution. Besides, the U.S. Constitution only
                      states that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of
                      religion.” Our founding fathers, who acknowledged the Creator in many
                      places, including the Declaration of Independence, did not want a
                      national religion such as the Church of England. (The phrase “separation
                      of church and state” is not in the Constitution. Nor is the word
                      “separation” or the word “church.”)
                      Yours truly,
                      Michael

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • tinroad66
                      ... the ... 792- ... Experimental ... 9, ... Biofeedback ... Tin: One does know that relaxation leads to health benefits. The documentation of this reality
                      Message 10 of 11 , Apr 27, 2003
                      • 0 Attachment
                        --- In creationevolutiondebate@yahoogroups.com, Michael Tong
                        <mtong5@j...> wrote:
                        > > they do not object to the teaching of
                        > > > evolution. In the light of studies showing that prayer and
                        > > religious
                        > > > faith could have health benefits,
                        > >
                        > > Tin: As do meditation, breathing techniques and biofeedback.
                        > >
                        > > Michael: Provide a study to support this.
                        >
                        > Tin: ok
                        >
                        > Agras, W. S., Southam, M. A., & Taylor, C. B. (1983). Long-term
                        > persistence of relaxation-induced blood pressure lowering during
                        the
                        > working day. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 51,
                        792-
                        > 794.
                        > Aivazyan, T. A., Zaitsev, V. P., Salenko, B. B., Yurenev, A. P., &
                        > Patrusheva, I. F. (1988). Efficacy of relaxation techniques in
                        > hypertensive patients: Fifth joint USA-USSR symposium on arterial
                        > hypertension. Health Psychology, 7(Suppl.), 193-200.
                        > Andreoli, A., Casolari, L., & Rigatelli, M. (1995). Expressive
                        > relaxation training and anxiety disorders. New Trends in
                        Experimental
                        > and Clinical Psychiatry, 11, 123-129.
                        > Aponte, J. F., & Aponte, C. E. (1971). Group programmed
                        > desensitization without the simultaneous presentation of aversive
                        > scenes with relaxation training. Behaviour Research and Therapy,
                        9,
                        > 337-346.
                        > Balick, L., Elfner, L., May, J., & Moore, J. D. (1982).
                        Biofeedback
                        > treatment of dysmenorrhea. Biofeedback and Self-Regulation, 7, 499-
                        > 520.
                        > (Snip)
                        >
                        > Michael: One does not know whether the above techniques would have
                        > benefited those individuals helped by prayer.
                        >

                        Tin: One does know that relaxation leads to health benefits. The
                        documentation of this reality is indeed impressive. What we have not
                        seen is any evidence that prayer leads to any special benefits beyond
                        those that would be expected from repititive relaxation techniques.
                        If you would like to conclude that it does you must provide
                        evidence. Again we see that natural explanations seem to work quite
                        nicely.
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.