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diseased Procambarus clarkii

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  • Steve
    Hello, I am not a crayfish specialist by any means - I am an insect systematist (Diptera - flies). But I do keep some crayfish for pets (whatever species we
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 4, 2004
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      Hello,
      I am not a crayfish specialist by any means - I am an insect
      systematist (Diptera - flies). But I do keep some crayfish for pets
      (whatever species we collect locally). In any case, I have a large
      male Procambarus clarkii that I have had in an aquarium (along with 2
      females) for over a year. About a month ago or more, the male
      sequestered itself in a shelter and only rarely came out during times
      when I saw it. I recently noticed its claws are severely pocked with
      holes in the exoskeleton, and when it did come out tonight, there is
      some similar damage to the dorsal part of the abdomen. The carapace
      has only minimal damage - the claws and abdomen seem to be most badly
      damaged. Most of the damage on the claws seems to be on the various
      spines and processes (ie, most of the spines are broken off, leaving
      a gaping hole in the exoskeleton). I looked on your website about
      crayfish diseases linked from the BYU crayfish site and found two
      disease syndromes that seem to match the symptoms, one for the
      bacterial form and one for the fungal form:

      1) Bacterial shell disease - Shell disease of freshwater crayfish has
      been associated both with bacteria and fungi. The disease is
      characterised by progressive erosion of the exoskeleton and is fatal
      when large areas of the exoskeleton have been eroded. Bacteria
      associated with shell disease include Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and
      Citrobacter species.

      2) Burn spot disease - Burn spot disease, often referred to as shell
      disease, is a common disease of freshwater crayfish which is caused
      by fungi and/or bacteria. The disease is characterised by progressive
      erosion of the exoskeleton and is fatal when large areas of the
      exoskeleton have been eroded. Fungal species involved with shell
      disease include Ramularia astaci, Cephalosporium leptodactyli and
      Didymaria cambari.

      I just wonder if you find this odd for these diseases to occur in an
      aquarium after so long (over a year) without exposure to wild
      populations? Should I remove the male to "put it out of its misery"
      (it is very listless when it comes out, and seems to just stumble
      around and then return to its hideout) and/or to hopefully prevent
      the spread of the disease to the females (one of which is in berry)?
      In any case, any insight would be appreciated
    • Leigh
      Steve - you might want to post your observations and question to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CrawfishFarm/ There are several commercial crayfishermen with
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 4, 2004
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        Steve - you might want to post your observations and question to:

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CrawfishFarm/

        There are several commercial crayfishermen with large ponds. They may
        have seen something like that before.

        I think there is also an aquaculture page from Purdue Univ that might
        be helpful. I don't have the URL.

        This isn't the right season for molt is it?

        Leigh M
        Portland

        --- In crayfish@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <sgaimari@s...> wrote:
        >
        I recently noticed its claws are severely pocked with
        > holes in the exoskeleton, and when it did come out tonight, there
        is
        > some similar damage to the dorsal part of the abdomen. The carapace
        > has only minimal damage - >
        > I just wonder if you find this odd for these diseases to occur in
        an
        > aquarium after so long (over a year) without exposure to wild
        > populations?
      • Pauline Chong
        i m not good with crayfish, and my poor crayfish, ditto, died while molting (when she laid on the side of the tank, she looked like she was molting.) i still
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 6, 2004
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          i'm not good with crayfish, and my poor crayfish, ditto, died while molting (when she laid on the side of the tank, she looked like she was molting.) i still don't know what happened.
          i don't beleve u should release any of ur poor crayfish into the water because they could unleash their disease and kill the local crayfish population. plus, they would be more used to geting food at the same pattern while being in the wild, they might not. good luck! i hope they feel better!


          Hello,
          I am not a crayfish specialist by any means - I am an insect
          systematist (Diptera - flies). But I do keep some crayfish for pets
          (whatever species we collect locally). In any case, I have a large
          male Procambarus clarkii that I have had in an aquarium (along with 2
          females) for over a year. About a month ago or more, the male
          sequestered itself in a shelter and only rarely came out during times
          when I saw it. I recently noticed its claws are severely pocked with
          holes in the exoskeleton, and when it did come out tonight, there is
          some similar damage to the dorsal part of the abdomen. The carapace
          has only minimal damage - the claws and abdomen seem to be most badly
          damaged. Most of the damage on the claws seems to be on the various
          spines and processes (ie, most of the spines are broken off, leaving
          a gaping hole in the exoskeleton). I looked on your website about
          crayfish diseases linked from the BYU crayfish site and found two
          disease syndromes that seem to match the symptoms, one for the
          bacterial form and one for the fungal form:

          1) Bacterial shell disease - Shell disease of freshwater crayfish has
          been associated both with bacteria and fungi. The disease is
          characterised by progressive erosion of the exoskeleton and is fatal
          when large areas of the exoskeleton have been eroded. Bacteria
          associated with shell disease include Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and
          Citrobacter species.

          2) Burn spot disease - Burn spot disease, often referred to as shell
          disease, is a common disease of freshwater crayfish which is caused
          by fungi and/or bacteria. The disease is characterised by progressive
          erosion of the exoskeleton and is fatal when large areas of the
          exoskeleton have been eroded. Fungal species involved with shell
          disease include Ramularia astaci, Cephalosporium leptodactyli and
          Didymaria cambari.

          I just wonder if you find this odd for these diseases to occur in an
          aquarium after so long (over a year) without exposure to wild
          populations? Should I remove the male to "put it out of its misery"
          (it is very listless when it comes out, and seems to just stumble
          around and then return to its hideout) and/or to hopefully prevent
          the spread of the disease to the females (one of which is in berry)?
          In any case, any insight would be appreciated





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        • Janet Tindol
          My crawfish, Igor, FINALLY molted two weeks ago. I bought special crawfish food and learned that changing the water frequently was beneficial for my crawfish.
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 7, 2004
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            My crawfish, Igor, FINALLY molted two weeks ago. I
            bought special crawfish food and learned that changing
            the water frequently was beneficial for my crawfish.
            I believe that keeping the water clean and giving
            crawfish the correct food is the key to survival.
            Crawfish are tough, at least Igor is because I got
            him/her from the wild. Igor has gotten rid of the
            fuzzy junk he had for the longest time. I learned
            that Igor likes clean water even tho I found him in a
            mud hole. Go figure!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Where did ya'll
            get your crawfish????????? Stores???????? From the
            wild????????????????????

            Janet



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          • Steve
            Mine are from a muddy stream near a golf course. But, they are an introduced species - it is not native to California. I have 1 male and 2 females - one of the
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 7, 2004
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              Mine are from a muddy stream near a golf course. But, they are an
              introduced species - it is not native to California. I have 1 male
              and 2 females - one of the females successfully had her eggs hatch,
              and I had about 30 young - I gave them away, put a tank at work, and
              got a second home tank - nature (cannibalism) took care of the extras.

              --- In crayfish@yahoogroups.com, Janet Tindol <gableclark@y...> wrote:
              > My crawfish, Igor, FINALLY molted two weeks ago. I
              > bought special crawfish food and learned that changing
              > the water frequently was beneficial for my crawfish.
              > I believe that keeping the water clean and giving
              > crawfish the correct food is the key to survival.
              > Crawfish are tough, at least Igor is because I got
              > him/her from the wild. Igor has gotten rid of the
              > fuzzy junk he had for the longest time. I learned
              > that Igor likes clean water even tho I found him in a
              > mud hole. Go figure!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Where did ya'll
              > get your crawfish????????? Stores???????? From the
              > wild????????????????????
              >
              > Janet
              >
              >
              >
              > __________________________________
              > Do you Yahoo!?
              > Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page.
              > www.yahoo.com
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