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Hi, I Found a Crustacean

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  • Arrûniel Nalîaz McGondor
    I just found what I think is an Australian Red Claw Crayfish the day before yesterday. I live in San Antonio, Texas, a sub-desert area, and while we have
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 5, 2007
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      I just found what I think is an Australian Red Claw Crayfish the day before yesterday.

      I live in San Antonio, Texas, a sub-desert area, and while we have creeks here, it doesn't look native. It's four inches long from it's snout to the tip of it's tail, and dark reddish-brown. It has claws on the first eight of it's legs, but not the last two.

      I found it on the sidewalk outside of a building.

      It was dark, so I reached down to get a better look at it. It looked like a giant beetle on it's back, since it was curled up tight and belly up. Suddenly, it batted at me with one of it's fore-claws. Then I knew it was alive, and I couldn't just leave it there to die. I tried to find another home for it, but no one else would take it. So, instead of leaving it to die, I took it home.

      That night I bought a tank and accessories (filter, aerator, bubble stone, hose, three plastic plants, two rock formations big enough for it to hide behind, krill, shrimp pellets, tropical fish flakes, water conditioner, a large net, and eight gallons of spring water). Should I buy a heater? The tank came with a lamp. Will it keep it warm enough? Does the crayfish need light? If so how much? Should I shut it off at night, or keep it on all the time? I've kept on all the time and she stays near the top, swimming in the water fall from the filter.

      Today's good news is that her claws have finally uncrossed.

      I feed her a teaspoon or two of tropical fish flakes every day. Is that too much. She looks at least a year old. Is everyday too often? Should I use the pellets instead? She hasn't gone to the bottom yet. I think she might have been out of water for over twelve hours, may be two days, so she is still recovering. I'm amazed that she is alive at all. It's wonderful. She was lucky I found her, but I feel lucky for finding her. She has proven quite resilient so far.

      I'm sorry if I've written too much. I'm nervous. I found one some years ago, but it didn't survive long, less than a week. I want to do this right. I don't want the poor creature to suffer. She has been through so much. She is dong much better now, and I hope she will recover fully and live a nice, long, healthy, crayfish life.




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    • David Johnson
      Welcome to the fascinating world of crays. If she is an aussie breed, then she will want warmer water. My surviving cray is native to where I live, so he has
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 5, 2007
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        Welcome to the fascinating world of crays.

        If she is an aussie breed, then she will want warmer water. My surviving cray
        is native to where I live, so he has no problem with ambient temperature.

        Crays are omnivorous. Some species are sensitive to too much protein in their
        diet, so a diet that is mostly vegetable matter is generally desired.

        Crays have small stomachs, so it is diffucult to over feed them. I feed mine
        twice a day. If there's food left over, after he's done nibbling then I pull
        it out. They will often fast for a few days just before molting.

        I feed mine algae pellets, augmented by shrimp pellets. Ebi stays on the
        botom of the tank generally. His sister, zaregani, used to hang out on top
        of the rocks. She had a couple of bad moltings and passed away in November,
        following her second bad molting.

        If yours like the flakes you are feeding her then she should be fine. I like
        to use reef supplements to provide iodine, calcium and strontium for good
        shell development and (theoretically) better molting. I'm not so sure about
        the better molting theory.

        Crays are generally nocturnal. They are also the penultimate escape artists.

        Welcome to the group, and keep us posted.

        Cheers!
        David Johnson
        NW Arkansas

        On Wednesday 05 December 2007 09:47, Arrûniel Nalîaz McGondor wrote:
        > I just found what I think is an Australian Red Claw Crayfish the day before
        > yesterday.
        >
        > I live in San Antonio, Texas, a sub-desert area, and while we have creeks
        > here, it doesn't look native. It's four inches long from it's snout to the
        > tip of it's tail, and dark reddish-brown. It has claws on the first eight
        > of it's legs, but not the last two.
        >
        > I found it on the sidewalk outside of a building.
        >
        > It was dark, so I reached down to get a better look at it. It looked like a
        > giant beetle on it's back, since it was curled up tight and belly up.
        > Suddenly, it batted at me with one of it's fore-claws. Then I knew it was
        > alive, and I couldn't just leave it there to die. I tried to find another
        > home for it, but no one else would take it. So, instead of leaving it to
        > die, I took it home.
        >
        > That night I bought a tank and accessories (filter, aerator, bubble stone,
        > hose, three plastic plants, two rock formations big enough for it to hide
        > behind, krill, shrimp pellets, tropical fish flakes, water conditioner, a
        > large net, and eight gallons of spring water). Should I buy a heater? The
        > tank came with a lamp. Will it keep it warm enough? Does the crayfish need
        > light? If so how much? Should I shut it off at night, or keep it on all the
        > time? I've kept on all the time and she stays near the top, swimming in the
        > water fall from the filter.
        >
        > Today's good news is that her claws have finally uncrossed.
        >
        > I feed her a teaspoon or two of tropical fish flakes every day. Is that too
        > much. She looks at least a year old. Is everyday too often? Should I use
        > the pellets instead? She hasn't gone to the bottom yet. I think she might
        > have been out of water for over twelve hours, may be two days, so she is
        > still recovering. I'm amazed that she is alive at all. It's wonderful. She
        > was lucky I found her, but I feel lucky for finding her. She has proven
        > quite resilient so far.
        >
        > I'm sorry if I've written too much. I'm nervous. I found one some years
        > ago, but it didn't survive long, less than a week. I want to do this right.
        > I don't want the poor creature to suffer. She has been through so much. She
        > is dong much better now, and I hope she will recover fully and live a nice,
        > long, healthy, crayfish life.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ___________________________________________________________________________
        >_________ Be a better friend, newshound, and
        > know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
        > http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
      • Crusty
        Hi That would be interesting if it was a redclaw caught in the wild. Photos will be handy to help identify it and sex it. If your house temp or where the tank
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 6, 2007
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          Hi

          That would be interesting if it was a redclaw caught in the wild.
          Photos will be handy to help identify it and sex it.

          If your house temp or where the tank is does not regularly drop below
          18C then no heater will be needed.

          The crayfish really does not need light and too much of it will stress
          it somewhat. So try to only have your lights on only when YOU need it
          and the natural light in your house will do the rest. Keep the tank as
          dark as you can for the next two weeks to let it settle down.

          Probably not quite as much feed and try to use some form of pellet
          (shrimp) instead of the flakes. You will find it will not be all that
          hungry for the first few days.

          Grab a water test kit for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate and check the
          water every day for the next two weeks to keep an eye out for drops in
          pH and spikes in the nitrogens (ammonia and nitrite).

          Cheers
          Crusty
          www.crayfishmates.com



          Arrûniel Nalîaz McGondor wrote:
          > I just found what I think is an Australian Red Claw Crayfish the day before yesterday.
          >
          > I live in San Antonio, Texas, a sub-desert area, and while we have creeks here, it doesn't look native. It's four inches long from it's snout to the tip of it's tail, and dark reddish-brown. It has claws on the first eight of it's legs, but not the last two.
          >
          > I found it on the sidewalk outside of a building.
          >
          > It was dark, so I reached down to get a better look at it. It looked like a giant beetle on it's back, since it was curled up tight and belly up. Suddenly, it batted at me with one of it's fore-claws. Then I knew it was alive, and I couldn't just leave it there to die. I tried to find another home for it, but no one else would take it. So, instead of leaving it to die, I took it home.
          >
          > That night I bought a tank and accessories (filter, aerator, bubble stone, hose, three plastic plants, two rock formations big enough for it to hide behind, krill, shrimp pellets, tropical fish flakes, water conditioner, a large net, and eight gallons of spring water). Should I buy a heater? The tank came with a lamp. Will it keep it warm enough? Does the crayfish need light? If so how much? Should I shut it off at night, or keep it on all the time? I've kept on all the time and she stays near the top, swimming in the water fall from the filter.
          >
          > Today's good news is that her claws have finally uncrossed.
          >
          > I feed her a teaspoon or two of tropical fish flakes every day. Is that too much. She looks at least a year old. Is everyday too often? Should I use the pellets instead? She hasn't gone to the bottom yet. I think she might have been out of water for over twelve hours, may be two days, so she is still recovering. I'm amazed that she is alive at all. It's wonderful. She was lucky I found her, but I feel lucky for finding her. She has proven quite resilient so far.
          >
          > I'm sorry if I've written too much. I'm nervous. I found one some years ago, but it didn't survive long, less than a week. I want to do this right. I don't want the poor creature to suffer. She has been through so much. She is dong much better now, and I hope she will recover fully and live a nice, long, healthy, crayfish life.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ____________________________________________________________________________________
          > Be a better friend, newshound, and
          > know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • ASDrew@aol.com
          I had my red claws under a picture window in a 55 gallon tank, and in the winter the tank got quite cold, the weird thing was that the female berried up in
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 6, 2007
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            I had my red claws under a picture window in a 55 gallon tank, and in the
            winter the tank got quite cold, the weird thing was that the female berried up
            in those conditions... I thought they came from Australia... and thought their
            water was warm there.... ?




            Hi

            That would be interesting if it was a redclaw caught in the wild.
            Photos will be handy to help identify it and sex it.

            If your house temp or where the tank is does not regularly drop below
            18C then no heater will be needed.

            The crayfish really does not need light and too much of it will stress
            it somewhat. So try to only have your lights on only when YOU need it
            and the natural light in your house will do the rest. Keep the tank as
            dark as you can for the next two weeks to let it settle down.

            Probably not quite as much feed and try to use some form of pellet
            (shrimp) instead of the flakes. You will find it will not be all that
            hungry for the first few days.

            Grab a water test kit for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate and check the
            water every day for the next two weeks to keep an eye out for drops in
            pH and spikes in the nitrogens (ammonia and nitrite).

            Cheers
            Crusty
            www.crayfishmates.www

            Arrûniel Nalîaz McGondor wrote:
            > I just found what I think is an Australian Red Claw Crayfish the day
            before yesterday.
            >
            > I live in San Antonio, Texas, a sub-desert area, and while we have creeks
            here, it doesn't look native. It's four inches long from it's snout to the
            tip of it's tail, and dark reddish-brown. It has claws on the first eight of
            it's legs, but not the last two.
            >
            > I found it on the sidewalk outside of a building.
            >
            > It was dark, so I reached down to get a better look at it. It looked like
            a giant beetle on it's back, since it was curled up tight and belly up.
            Suddenly, it batted at me with one of it's fore-claws. Then I knew it was alive,
            and I couldn't just leave it there to die. I tried to find another home for
            it, but no one else would take it. So, instead of leaving it to die, I took it
            home.
            >
            > That night I bought a tank and accessories (filter, aerator, bubble stone,
            hose, three plastic plants, two rock formations big enough for it to hide
            behind, krill, shrimp pellets, tropical fish flakes, water conditioner, a large
            net, and eight gallons of spring water). Should I buy a heater? The tank
            came with a lamp. Will it keep it warm enough? Does the crayfish need light? If
            so how much? Should I shut it off at night, or keep it on all the time? I've
            kept on all the time and she stays near the top, swimming in the water fall
            from the filter.
            >
            > Today's good news is that her claws have finally uncrossed.
            >
            > I feed her a teaspoon or two of tropical fish flakes every day. Is that
            too much. She looks at least a year old. Is everyday too often? Should I use
            the pellets instead? She hasn't gone to the bottom yet. I think she might have
            been out of water for over twelve hours, may be two days, so she is still
            recovering. I'm amazed that she is alive at all. It's wonderful. She was lucky I
            found her, but I feel lucky for finding her. She has proven quite resilient
            so far.
            >
            > I'm sorry if I've written too much. I'm nervous. I found one some years
            ago, but it didn't survive long, less than a week. I want to do this right. I
            don't want the poor creature to suffer. She has been through so much. She is
            dong much better now, and I hope she will recover fully and live a nice, long,
            healthy, crayfish life.





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