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Re: [cr-users] Re: New member and a question

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  • dnhreshivik
    The best thing about CadRail for me has been being able to give up pencil, paper, erasers, drawing tools, etc, etc, ad nauseum.  No plan I ever drew for my
    Message 1 of 21 , Sep 1, 2009
      The best thing about CadRail for me has been being able to give up pencil, paper, erasers, drawing tools, etc, etc, ad nauseum.  No plan I ever drew for my railroad prior to CadRail was what I would call satisfactory visually due to all the erasing involved.  I hate the appearance of grey fuzzy paper.  Other than very rough idea sketching, I have never drawn anything more detailed without the use of CadRail since then. 

      The other thing I've enjoyed is the the dimensional exactness achieveable with this program.  If you make sure your room measurements are right on you can literally build the railroad you design using 1" = 1" printouts taped together.  If I design the points of a turnout to be 11.75 inches from a wall I can build with confidence knowing the real turnout will fit in to the rest of the trackwork exactly where it's supposed to.

      CadRail been an indispensible tool that has made the enjoyment of high quality scale model railroading a reality for me.

      Rick Shivik
      HO D&H Champlain Division 



      ________________________________
      From: Jerry Jankura <toolznglue@...>
      To: cr-users@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, September 1, 2009 6:45:14 PM
      Subject: Re: [cr-users] Re: New member and a question

       

      On Tue Sep 1, 2009, at 4:59 PM, msutinen2001 wrote:

      > I do have a some photos, but they are very old, and very few of them
      > are straight on. But I have some drawings that I did with the other
      > product, so scanning them may be a good approach. thanks for the idea.

      Does the "other program" have the ability to export a file as a DXF
      formatted file? If so, you can import it to CadRail and pick up where
      you left off.

      What other CAD programs are you looking at? I'd suggest that you take
      a good look at the human interface - that's how you actually
      manipulate all of the tools - and see which interface you like better.
      Most of these CAD programs are capable; it's the human interface that
      really sets them apart. I've been working with one version of CadRail
      or another for about nine years. When I was making my initial
      evaluation, I looked at 3rd-Planit, XTrkCad, and the one that Atlas
      currently offers at no charge. Of these, I liked the interface
      presented by CadRail; it worked more like I work better than any of
      the others.

      One thing to think about - CadRail is really a Cad program that just
      happens to have some extensions and libraries that make it amenable to
      model railroads. Consider it as a tool in your bag of tricks and
      figure out how you can use it outside of your model railroading.
      You'll have already paid for it, so why not get the biggest bang for
      your buck?

      For example, I've used it to draw quilting templates for Carol which I
      then converted to DXF files. I imported those DXF files into another,
      more expensive CAD program and generated G-Code (instructions for a
      CNC machine) so that my Sherline CNC mill could cut it. Why use
      CadRail for that task when I had to import the DXF file into another
      CAD program to build the G-Code? Simple, CadRail has one of the best
      trace capabilities that I've ever seen. It also has a few tools for
      fitting arcs to a drawing that I've not seen in other, more expensive,
      CAD programs.

      Also, with digital photography, you can take photos of prototype
      buildings, use a program such as Photoshop Elements to correct
      perspective, and then import and trace them. Once they've been
      committed to CAD, you can modify or rescale them to suit your own needs.

      Jerry Jankura
      So many toys.... So little time....




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ted Becker
      The printer was a Canon bubble jet. I would NOT try it with a laser printer since the toner is fused with heat and would probably melt the styrene. I ve only
      Message 2 of 21 , Sep 1, 2009
        The printer was a Canon bubble jet. I would NOT try it with a laser
        printer since the toner is fused with heat and would probably melt
        the styrene. I've only printed on styrene once, on 0.005"
        stock. The ink smears off pretty easily. After I printed I glued
        1/8" square styrene on the printed base to make a jig for wooden legs
        and bracing for a water tower base. Would be great for trestles. I
        wouldn't try to use a printer that does not have a relatively
        straight paper path.

        I use layers a lot and lots of layers. You can hide them and bring
        them back at will, rename, change color or freeze them. It's great
        on a layout to combine track, benchwork, scenery, etc in one
        drawing. Hidden layers don't print which is useful.

        I'm sure you'll learn more tricks as you use the program.

        At 02:05 PM 9/1/2009, you wrote:
        >
        >
        >Thanks for the tips Ted.
        >The use of layers is something new to me, but I think I understand
        >about the dimensions.
        >
        >While I haven't taped print copies to styrene, I have built mock-ups
        >by taping copies to foamcore. rather crude, but it gives me a good
        >idea of how the model will fit.
        >
        >What type of printer do you use for printing on styrene?
        >
        >Regards,
        >Mike S.
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • wdutchman721@aol.com
        Hello and Welcome to our group! I have been using CADrail for some time now.? I have a Version 8 program.? I have used my CADrail for every kind of
        Message 3 of 21 , Sep 2, 2009
          Hello and Welcome to our group!
          I have been using CADrail for some time now.? I have a Version 8 program.? I have used my CADrail for every kind of "mechanical" drawing I might make.? Besides doing model railroad planning, I have used it to develop a pattern to make a Renaissance Dress and Cape for my granddaughter to attend a Renaissance Fair with my daughter and her husband.? I have designed a Captain's Style Bed that my son wanted to build for his daughter.? I have drawn numerous other wood working projects with it as well.? CADrail is really a versatile CAD program that undersells itself by tying itself so closely to model railroading.? Since I am not into 3 D industrial drawing, I have not yet found a project that I could not do on this program.? Enjoy yourself and don't be afraid to experiment a bit.? CADrail has been very forgiving when I have made mistakes.? I love it!? Alan? ?




          ?



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Charlie Bedard
          Rich Shivik wrote: ³The other thing I ve enjoyed is the the dimensional exactness achieveable with this program.  If you make sure your room measurements are
          Message 4 of 21 , Sep 2, 2009
            Rich Shivik wrote:
            ³The other thing I've enjoyed is the the dimensional exactness achieveable
            with this program.  If you make sure your room measurements are right on you
            can literally build the railroad you design using 1" = 1" printouts taped
            together.  If I design the points of a turnout to be 11.75 inches from a
            wall I can build with confidence knowing the real turnout will fit in to the
            rest of the trackwork exactly where it's supposed to.²

            As a ³proper² CAD program, I use CADRail for a lot more than layout
            planning. In particular, I used the layers extensively to design and build
            my benchwork precisely. I measured my room EXACTLY and then laid out all the
            benchwork elements in separate layers. I have a layer for room obstructions,
            another shows just the legs and supports, another for my movable staging,
            another for subroadbed etc..

            The beauty of this is that I was able to build my various benchwork elements
            as modules to accurate dimensions. Then, when I installed them into the
            room, everything fit together perfectly. The smile on my face as the last
            piece dropped perfectly into place is a testament to the value of planning
            using CAD.

            CADRail is probably the most valuable tool in my toolbox!

            Charlie


            .






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • msutinen2001
            Jerry, Thanks for the reply. ... The other program is the original version of Visio, and no, it doesn t export as a DXF. ... I started with a wide range of
            Message 5 of 21 , Sep 2, 2009
              Jerry,
              Thanks for the reply.
              --- In cr-users@yahoogroups.com, Jerry Jankura <toolznglue@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Does the "other program" have the ability to export a file as a DXF formatted file? If so, you can import it to CadRail and pick up where >you left off.
              >
              The "other" program is the original version of Visio, and no, it doesn't export as a DXF.



              > What other CAD programs are you looking at? I'd suggest that you take

              I started with a wide range of products including 3rd-Planit SmartDraw, TurboCAD, CADPRo, Model-Builder, and even the current version of Visio. Some are too expensive, and some seemed to be geared to specific applications like electrical schematics.


              >
              > Also, with digital photography, you can take photos of prototype
              > buildings, use a program such as Photoshop Elements to correct
              > perspective, and then import and trace them. Once they've been
              > committed to CAD, you can modify or rescale them to suit your own needs.
              >

              Unfortunaely, most of the prototypes I model no longer exist, so I rely on old photos.
            • Jerry Jankura
              ... Have you tried scanning those old photos and enhancing them with a program such as Photoshop Elements or PaintShop Pro? Jerry Jankura So many toys.... So
              Message 6 of 21 , Sep 2, 2009
                On Wed Sep 2, 2009, at 1:06 PM, msutinen2001 wrote:

                > Unfortunaely, most of the prototypes I model no longer exist, so I
                > rely on old photos.

                Have you tried scanning those old photos and enhancing them with a
                program such as Photoshop Elements or PaintShop Pro?

                Jerry Jankura
                So many toys.... So little time....
              • msutinen2001
                Not yet. Is there an advantage in running them through Photoshop or Paintshop before tracing over them in CADRail?
                Message 7 of 21 , Sep 3, 2009
                  Not yet.
                  Is there an advantage in running them through Photoshop or Paintshop before tracing over them in CADRail?


                  --- In cr-users@yahoogroups.com, Jerry Jankura <toolznglue@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > On Wed Sep 2, 2009, at 1:06 PM, msutinen2001 wrote:
                  >
                  > > Unfortunaely, most of the prototypes I model no longer exist, so I
                  > > rely on old photos.
                  >
                  > Have you tried scanning those old photos and enhancing them with a
                  > program such as Photoshop Elements or PaintShop Pro?
                  >
                  > Jerry Jankura
                  > So many toys.... So little time....
                  >
                • Jerry Jankura
                  It depends. You ll be tracing them manually, so it s not a matter of providing something that Cadrail can process more easily. However, you might be able to
                  Message 8 of 21 , Sep 3, 2009
                    It depends. You'll be tracing them manually, so it's not a matter of
                    providing something that Cadrail can process more easily. However, you
                    might be able to use tools in these genre of programs that adjust
                    contrast, picture quality, and perhaps sharpen the image edges to make
                    it easier for you to trace around the details.

                    One trick that I learned while trying to trace track plans.... Since
                    Cadrail asks you to enter the width of the image, you'll want to crop
                    the image to the edges of the building if you know how wide the
                    building is. Then Cadrail will adjust the height so that the aspect
                    ratio remains the same.

                    Tom at Sandia: One thing you might want to consider for a further
                    release is providing the ability for the user to mark two horizontal
                    points on the image and specify the distance between them. That way,
                    someone could mark off a window or door opening and enter a "standard"
                    width rather than have to infer a width. It would also mean that you
                    wouldn't have to crop the photo.

                    > Not yet.
                    > Is there an advantage in running them through Photoshop or Paintshop
                    > before tracing over them in CADRail?
                    >
                    >> Have you tried scanning those old photos and enhancing them with a
                    >> program such as Photoshop Elements or PaintShop Pro?

                    Jerry Jankura
                    So many toys.... So little time....
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