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RE: [Covenanted Reformation] Antinomian?

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  • Bill Ross
    ... The word antinomianism is commonly used to refer to the idea that a person can sin as they please and still be justified. Obviously that is
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 30, 2002
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      <gnw>

      >>Antinomianism is a heresy, and I cannot allow heresy to be openly promoted here like you are doing.

      <Bill>

      The word "antinomianism" is commonly used to refer to the idea that a person can sin as they please and still be justified. Obviously that is completely unscriptural.

      Please don't understand me to be promoting such an idea.

      What I was trying to point out was that Paul spent a good deal of ink arguing against the Judaizers who insisted that the believer must become torah-observant. In *this sense* he was "antinomian" - which literally means "against law."

      "Anomian" is a scriptural word that means "unprincipled" - completely devoid of principle. Paul was certainly not of that ilk.

      So what we have is a clarification of terms.

      But there are many who teach that Christ "neutered" the law by removing its "bite." That is, the believer is under the jurisidiction of the law, they say, but Christ has made its curses ineffectual. This is truly anomian - or unprincipled - and antinomian in the worst sense.

      I did not see anything in Calvin's comments that represented Paul's view, other than the profit of instruction, which I was quick to cite.

      1 Timothy 1:8 But we know that the law is good, if a man use it lawfully;

      1 Timothy 1:9 Knowing this, that the law is not made for a righteous man, but for the lawless and disobedient, for the ungodly and for sinners, for unholy and profane, for murderers of fathers and murderers of mothers, for manslayers,

      Bill Ross
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