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A Short History of the Covenanted Reformation

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  • raging_calvinist
    While I ve been quite busy with other matters, and have been unable to write as much in this club as I used to, I feel pressed to provide a short, easy to read
    Message 1 of 67 , Jun 25, 2002
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      While I've been quite busy with other matters, and have been unable
      to write as much in this club as I used to, I feel pressed to provide
      a short, easy to read and to understand, account of the Covenanted
      Reformation. Before beginning this endevor, I want to say some
      things about what I'm attempting to do:

      1. This isn't meant to be an exhaustive, or even an extensive
      history of the Covenanted Reformation. There are plenty of other
      sources for such things -- though they tend to be difficult to read
      for most. Assuredly, there will be alot of blanks that could be
      filled in, but I will try to hit the important parts.

      2. The posts may come in rapid succession at times, or may be a few
      days between, depending on the time I have to throw stuff together.
      Hopefully I can keep them coming enough to keep interest.

      3. I will begin with the Reformation in Scotland, though there are
      Covenanted Reformations found in Scripture (see Josiah's Reformation
      in 2nd Kings 23, for example), and there is evidence of at least a
      form of public social Covenanting going on on the Continent during
      the 1st Reformation (see the last quote in the club/group description
      about what went on in Calvin's Geneva).

      4. In doing this I hope to inform those who frequent this forum who
      perhaps had little or no knowledge of what Covenanters are or where
      they came from. But it is my desire that those who read these things
      carefully consider the testimony of the Martyrs. We are, for the
      most part, in an era and place of the world, where standing for your
      faith won't get you killed. This may not last forever, however, and
      so it is important to consider yourself, your faith, and how dear it
      is to you... as we look at how dear it was those who have gone before
      us.

      Next post: The Reformation Hits Scotland.

      gmw.
    • Fredrick Fleming
      Jerry: If the King broke the covenant as we see in the anerican Colony Then are the people free to make a new covenant with God, without the King? Declaration
      Message 67 of 67 , Dec 24, 2002
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        Jerry:
        If the King broke the covenant as we see in the
        anerican Colony Then are the people free to make a new
        covenant with God, without the King? "Declaration of
        Independance"

        Oh this is does in Opera. *smile
        --- "Jerry <raging.calvinist@...>"
        <raging.calvinist@...> wrote:
        > Next in the series on Covenanter History we'll look
        > at the Third
        > Article of the Solemn League and Covenant:
        >
        > Article 3
        >
        > "We shall, with the same sincerity, reality, and
        > constancy, in
        > our
        > several vocations, endeavour, with our estates and
        > lives, mutually to
        > preserve the rights and privileges of the
        > Parliaments, and the
        > liberties of the kingdoms; and to preserve and
        > defend the king's
        > majesty's person and authority, in the preservation
        > and defence of
        > the true religion and liberties of the kingdoms;
        > that the world may
        > bear witness with our consciences of our loyalty,
        > and that we have no
        > other thoughts or intentions to diminish his
        > majesty's just power and
        > greatness."
        >
        > In this article we see that the Covenanters, far
        > from making
        > themselves enemies of the Government, swore
        > themselves to preserve
        > the rights and privileges of the Parliaments, to
        > preserve and defend
        > the king's person and authority. It is important to
        > note the
        > phrase "in the preservation and defence of the true
        > religion and
        > liberties of the kingdoms." The Covenanters were
        > not swearing
        > themselves to unconditional loyalty to usurpers,
        > tyrants, or public
        > enemies of the true religion. This is an important
        > distinction that
        > we will touch on, Lord willing, a bit later in this
        > series. This
        > article reiterates what was sworn to in the National
        > Covenant of
        > Scotland: "We protest and promise... to defend the
        > king's royal
        > person and authority in defence of Christ's gospel,
        > the liberty of
        > the subject, the administration of justice, and the
        > punishment of
        > iniquity."
        >
        > Thomas Case notes that in this article the
        > Covenanter binds himself
        > to 1)Use the best means to inform himself of the
        > particular rights
        > and privileges of Parliament, the particular
        > liberties of the
        > kingdoms, etc., so that he may 2)Conform himself
        > to what he is
        > informed to be his duty. In other words, we are to
        > gain an
        > understanding of what rights and privileges of
        > government we are
        > swearing to preserve, so that we may best carry out
        > our duty to
        > preserve them.
        >
        > Now, we all occupy various stations in life. And
        > therefore we are
        > not all bound to the same level of understanding of
        > the rights and
        > privileges involved, nor are we all bound to the
        > same manner of
        > preserving them. The Covenanters bound themselves
        > according to
        > their "several vocations." The king, a lawyer, a
        > minister, a
        > farmer,
        > a soldier, may all have varying levels of
        > understanding and varying
        > levels of responsibility in the preservation of the
        > rights and
        > privileges of the civil government and of the King's
        > person and
        > authority.
        >
        > J.W. Shaw explains concerning the Third Article,
        >
        > "In their day, these covenants were charged with
        > being seditious,
        > and
        > subversive of all government; in modern times, they
        > have been opposed
        > as leaning too strongly to kingly government.
        > Neither charge can be
        > sustained. They admit the validity of royal power;
        > their framers
        > understood too well their own rights, and the claims
        > of Christ, to
        > sanction the principle of absolute or irresponsible
        > power. In the
        > National Covenant, the ends and obligations of civil
        > authority are
        > clearly stated and the engagement is to maintain
        > that authority
        > `in
        > defence' of these ends. In the Solemn League the
        > rights of
        > Parliament
        > are put first, and then what relates to the King's
        > majesty: and this
        > they will `preserve and defend' only `in defence of
        > true
        > religion and
        > the liberties of the kingdoms.' They evidently
        > regarded the
        > king,
        > not as a law-maker, but as the executive, and were
        > determined to
        > restrain the royal authority within its proper
        > limits. Their deeds
        > evidently so declare."
        >
        > By "their deeds" Shaw refers to the fact that the
        > Covenanters, at the
        > time of the first swearing of this Covenant, were
        > standing in
        > opposition to the King's attacks against religion
        > and liberty.
        > Later, when the King proved to be an incorrigible
        > and treacherous
        > public enemy of the Church of Jesus Christ and an
        > enemy of liberty,
        > the Covenanters produced the Sanquhar Declaration of
        > War, and
        > excommunicated the King from the Church. Again, we
        > will, Lord
        > willing, look at these things a bit later. For now,
        > here are some
        > Scriptures related to the Christian's duty to the
        > civil
        > authorities,
        > for further study:
        > Matt. 22:21; Rom. 13:1-7; Tim. 2:1-3; Titus 3:1; 1
        > Peter 2:17.
        >
        > Next up in the series on Covenanter History: Article
        > Four of the
        > Solemn League and Covenant.
        >
        > gmw.
        >
        >
        >


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