Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Covenanted Reformation] Proclamation of Bans

Expand Messages
  • Cheryl
    If weddings are part of public worship, then all weddings/marriages that take place outside of the church are no marriages at all in this view. This is more
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 21, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      If weddings are part of public worship, then all weddings/marriages that take place outside of the church are no marriages at all in this view.  This is more the view of Roman Catholicism, than that of Protestantism, I believe.  The institution of marriage/family gov't instead, as I understand it, is a universal, light of nature covenant given my common grace to all mankind, much the same way that all civil gov't is.  Thus many practices found in various wedding ceremonies have to do with cultural differences.
       
      Cheryl
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, March 21, 2005 6:28 AM
      Subject: [Covenanted Reformation] Proclamation of Bans



      I have noticed that the Proclamation makes no provision for many
      things that are part and parcel of weddings today. Engagement rings,
      wedding rings, honeymoons, and also the state-issued marriage
      license. Since a wedding is an act of public worship, and all
      worship comes under the RPW, would the lack of scriptural support
      for these practises and the fact that none are mentioned in the POB
      make some or all of them forbidden? Is there an official
      Presbyterian position on this?

      Also, as regards the marriage license, since it would bring a couple
      under the jurisdiction of the Family Court in the event of breakup,
      and this Court is closed, rather than public, would this violate the
      Confession's requirement that all such proceedings be public? If so,
      should church judicatories deal with such things and make them open
      to the public? Just curious.

      As for throwing rice, since this is done in immitation of a pagan
      Roman ritual, should this practise be considered an act of pagan
      worship forbidden in the word?

      Finally, does the Ezra passage on the Israelites putting away their
      pagan wives restrict interracial marriage? If so, would marriage be
      restricted along the broad lines (Japethite, Hamitic, & Semitic) or
      along narrower lines (Tueton, Gaelic, Slav, within the Japethitic
      tribe)? Could a Germanic person marry a Slav or Magyar, or Roman? Or
      do God's instructions to Peter "arise, kill and eat" make all or
      some racial distinctions irrelevant to marital union?

      Just wanting to know everyone's thoughts on this, and because these
      can be "hot" topics, I hope we all approach them civilly. All the
      best to everyone.







    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.