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Proofreading Help

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  • Ginny Dohms
    Dear Friends, (Please bear with this long post) Over the past number of years, we have seen the selection of old books and other old resources from Second
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 2, 2005
      Dear Friends,

      (Please bear with this long post)

      Over the past number of years, we have seen the selection of old books and
      other old resources from Second Reformation other times grow enormously.
      Much of this was initiated through Still Waters Revival Books,
      first with the photocopies which gave everyone access to these precious
      documents and more recently with the CD sets which gave us electronic
      versions, for simple electronic access and significantly reduce shelf space.
      However, even the CD sets suffered from disadvantages.  These included no
      searching functionality, no font manipulation and poor enlarging, and a
      significant amount of computer storage space necessary to store the books in
      this electronic format (making them non-conducive to web distribution).  The
      formats these CDs are in are essentially images of each page.

      We feel the next (and equally important) step is upon us.  That step is the
      conversion of many (if not most) of these books into an actual 'electronic
      text' format.  The benefits are immense.  They include full searching
      functionality, drastically reduced storage requirements, leading to fewer
      discs needed (estimating that 30 CDs in the old set could fit on 1 CD in the
      new) as well as free online distribution through the web.  Also, these would
      be incredibly easy to quote from, as easy as copy and paste. This is the
      only logical method for the perfect preservation of these documents into the
      future and the most efficient and effective means of distributing them on an
      even larger scale than can now be undertaken.  Despite the impressive
      computing technology of today, the process of developing these electronic
      texts from images still requires human intervention.  That is where you come
      in.

      Currently running online, is a website called Distributed Proofreaders
      (http://www.pgdp.net/).  It is run under the umbrella of Project Gutenberg
      (http://www.gutenberg.net/) which is a website with one of the largest
      collections of free old literature in electronic formats.  Distributed
      Proofreaders (DP) allows certain people to provide their own content for the
      site in the form of page images (like our CDs are currently in), and through
      a combined effort, gets converted into electronic text formats (one page at
      a time).  Through this combined effort, they process thousands of pages
      every day, with their online community.  The essense of Project Gutenberg
      (and consequently, DP) is free access for everyone.  All books that go on
      there must be public domain, therefore anyone can download, reformat, and/or
      redistribute books from their site for whatever use imagineable (even for
      profit).

      My son, Jordan has been granted the privilege of providing content for their site (and
      the responsibility of managing through the site).  He has already successfully managed the following books as they went through.  These are Christ, The Way, The Truth, and The Life (John Brown of Wamphray), Auchensaugh Renovation, Act, Declaration, and Testimony, Sketches of the Covenanters (McFeeters), Life of James Renwick (Houston), Divine Right of Church Government (by London Ministers), Notes on the Apocalypse (Steele) which are all up on Project Gutenberg, ready for the public to download.  Some of the titles in first and second round are:  True History of the Church of Scotland - Calderwood, Vindication of Presbyterial Government and Ministry - London Ministers, Acts of the General Assembly,  Covenants & The Covenanters - Kerr, Biographia Scoticana - Howie, Records of the Kirk of Scotland (Part 1 & 2) - Peterkin, Works of George Gillespie (Vol 1 & 2), The Works of Hugh Binning, Booke of the Universall Kirk of Scotland - Peterkin, A Coal from the Altar, to Kindle the Holy Fire of Zeale - Ward, etc.  We are anxious for the completion of these tomes to finally be able to get some of our subordinate standards in searchable form.
       
      This is a great project for everyone to get involved in as it doesn't
      require any great technical computer skills or theological skills to
      participate, but because the aim of the site is for quality of conversion
      rather than quantity, one should be comfortable with their computer and be a
      highly proficient English reader (I wouldn't recommend adolescents, etc).
      Another benefit is, it demands as little or as much time as you want to
      spare.  You can do one page a week or 50 pages a day.  This
      system manages everything and ensures that the book is done as quickly as
      possible.  But by working together, we are being the most productive.

      I mentioned quality.  DP strives to preserve the author's text as much as
      possible.  This includes leaving original spelling, including all footnotes,
      side notes, and illustrations.  We can be confident that our books will come
      out of here in excellent shape.  Far better than many independent projects
      of this nature.

      Jordan's vision for the future of this is to have all of our relevant books
      available in accurate electronic editions within a couple of years.  Aside
      from the effort of the proofreaders, there is work on the part of the
      project manager (Jordan) both before the book goes on the site and after the
      book has been finished on the site.  For that reason, we foresee us probably
      being able to produce one new book per week, which is actually quite
      impressive.  If, at a later point after doing a fair amount of proofreading,
      someone else feels ambitious enough to take on some project management
      roles, then we may even be able to increase that production.

      Thank you for reading this far.  If you want to know more specifics about
      how it works and how you can help out, please see below.  Feel free to
      forward this message if you know of others who may be interested.  If you
      are not interested, and don't know of anyone who is, thank you for your
      time.

      Ginny Dohms
      ________________________


      How Distributed Proofreaders Works:

      I could give a detailed description, but they have already developed an
      excellent summary of how it all works.  It can be found at:
      http://www.pgdp.net/c/faq/ProoferFAQ.php

      Please read all relevant portions of this before moving on to sign up.  It
      will just clear up a lot of questions you'll run into.

      ________________________


      How To Sign Up and Get Started:
      (Please have at least half an hour to an hour available for this, but please
      try it...it's simple once you get going.)

      Instead of using their instructions, I'll make a set specific to us.

      1: Go to http://www.pgdp.net/c/accounts/addproofer.php and enter in the
      appropriate information.

      2: Once you submit the information, a page will come up telling you that you
      have been signed up and may now begin proofing.

      3: Once you click that button in the middle, it will bring you to the main
      DP page.  If you scroll down the page, you will see a listing of all the
      books that are currently available to be proof read.  On the side bar you
      will see some statistics about the site and yourself.

      4: Before you start anything else, go to the following link...
      http://www.pgdp.net/c/stats/teams/tdetail.php?tid=250  This is our team
      page, just a convenient way to keep track of who's signed up and maybe add a
      little bit of friendly competition regarding pages completed.  Right beside
      the Team name (RPNA) and the XML button, there will be a link to "Join".  If
      you click that, it will add you to the team, so your name will appear in the
      list of members.  Before you leave this page, you can check out the team
      "Website" which is listed near the top of the page.  This is a page I
      maintain that simply lists all of the active projects I'm working on, and
      the state they are in.  This is for your information's sake and if you have
      suggestions for other books to do, you can send them to me.  You can now go
      back to the main DP page.

      5: Before you begin proofing, you MUST read the guidelines.  I cannot stress
      the importance of this enough.  For these books to be of any use to us, all
      of our proofreaders must be doing things the same way.  These guidelines can
      be accessed through the "Help" button at the top of every page, in the dark
      green bar.  In there, you'll find the "Proofing Guidelines".  I wouldn't say
      you have to read and remember every detail at the beginning, but at least
      look at and acknowledge every section so you'll know what there are rules
      about and just have it handy when you're doing your first 20-50 pages.  You
      won't run into most of the situations, but some you'll use a lot (italics,
      paragraphs, etc) so eventually you won't have to refer back to the
      guidelines anymore.

      6: Once you feel comfortable with the basic principles and guidelines of the
      proofing, go back to the main page listing all the current projects
      available in the first round.  If you scroll down the list, you may very
      likely see one or two listed with "Wraezor" (myself) as the Project Manager.
      Those are, obviously, our books.  However, for the first 5 or 10 pages that
      you proof, I would suggest doing ones listed as Beginner.  If you look in
      the Genre field, you will see some near the top listed as "BEGINNERS ONLY".
      Don't take this as an insult but as a safe way of getting some practice.
      People will be much more understanding if you make a mistake (or ten) here.
      When these projects move to the second round of proofing, the people who
      check it have much more experience and are encouraged to provide feedback to
      the beginners on what things they missed, so they can improve their skills.

      7: To try your hand at proofing a page, find one that looks good (preferably
      English, unless you're adventurous), and click on the title.  This will
      launch another window, which should take up your whole screen (you'll be
      using all of it, believe me).  At the top of the new window there will be a
      row of links.  If the window does not take up your whole screen, I would
      suggest going into "Interface Preferences" right now and changing it.  There
      are plenty of settings to tweak in here, so you may want to come back later,
      if you want to adjust your interface more to suit your style.  For now, just
      change the resolution, near the top of the left column.  Set it to the
      resolution your monitor is set at, if you know it.  If you don't, just bump
      it up one notch.  Now go to the bottom of the page and click the "Save
      Preferences" button.  Once it brings you back to the initial page you saw
      when you opened the window, close it, then go back to the main DP page
      listing the projects and hit Refresh on your browser.  Once it reloads,
      click on the same book again, and it should have adjusted your resolution to
      your new setting.  (If it's still not quite right, you can go back in and
      tweak it again.)

      8: Once you have your interface the right size, you can begin proofing.  To
      do that, ensure you are in the proofing window (which you enter by clicking
      on a book title and having it launch the new window), then scroll down and
      read the project comments.  Sometimes particular Project Managers want
      proofreaders to deviate from the standard Proofing Guidelines in some
      way...this is where they will list that.  If it all looks normal, scroll
      back up to the top and click "Start Proofing".

      9: This will launch the proofing screen (in a horizontal layout, which you
      can change in your preferences).  At the top you will see the page image,
      and at the bottom you will see the text version in a box.  Once you've proof
      read and corrected it all, according to the guidelines, you can use the
      buttons to move on or stop.  Use the "?" button in the bottom right to make
      sure you know what each button does.

      10: That's about it.  You've done a basic walkthrough of the system.  After
      you have done a few pages and are feeling more comfortable with the
      interface and the guidelines, feel free to try some EASY projects and then
      some of the books I have on there, which are some of the more useful books
      on there, you'll probably find.  With that, I just want to say, thanks so
      much for your help.
    • Antonio Menendez
      I am very interested in this particular project and hope to in times future put forward time, money and effort. I have only one major concern at this time that
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 2, 2005
        I am very interested in this particular project and hope to in times future put forward time, money and effort. I have only one major concern at this time that has been brought to my attention as far as the current translating forum being used.(though by far seeming like a good method)

        My major concern is that of altering of the actual work from its original(aside from translation of a latin, hebrew or greek phrase) by a person who actually seeks to use the work on a particular site of their own once the retypesetting is done by someone involved in the project. A , brother of our church locally, has talked to me about a way in which we can be covered by copyright as it regards these things if we do something that those in the open source do called copylefting. The reason I have this concern is that we want to have legal means if a person does reproduce that which is worked so hard on by yourself, Jordan and others to be preserved as to what was actually retypeset and in no way altered.
         
        This concern flows from the dishonesty that has been shown time and time again by other groups like the PCA, OPC, etc... that would paste just what is to their purpose and leave out other portions of the text when they feel it is convenient.
         
        These thoughts I am bringing forward to you guys probably have been thought about already I just wanted to make sure.
         
        Thank you so much for your labours for Christ's church in this area!
         
        In Christ, our Prophet, Priest and King,
         
        Antonio Menendez - reformedaugustinian
         
        Ginny Dohms <gdawn@...> wrote:
        Dear Friends,

        (Please bear with this long post)

        Over the past number of years, we have seen the selection of old books and
        other old resources from Second Reformation other times grow enormously.
        Much of this was initiated through Still Waters Revival Books,
        first with the photocopies which gave everyone access to these precious
        documents and more recently with the CD sets which gave us electronic
        versions, for simple electronic access and significantly reduce shelf space.
        However, even the CD sets suffered from disadvantages.  These included no
        searching functionality, no font manipulation and poor enlarging, and a
        significant amount of computer storage space necessary to store the books in
        this electronic format (making them non-conducive to web distribution).  The
        formats these CDs are in are essentially images of each page.

        We feel the next (and equally important) step is upon us.  That step is the
        conversion of many (if not most) of these books into an actual 'electronic
        text' format.  The benefits are immense.  They include full searching
        functionality, drastically reduced storage requirements, leading to fewer
        discs needed (estimating that 30 CDs in the old set could fit on 1 CD in the
        new) as well as free online distribution through the web.  Also, these would
        be incredibly easy to quote from, as easy as copy and paste. This is the
        only logical method for the perfect preservation of these documents into the
        future and the most efficient and effective means of distributing them on an
        even larger scale than can now be undertaken.  Despite the impressive
        computing technology of today, the process of developing these electronic
        texts from images still requires human intervention.  That is where you come
        in.

        Currently running online, is a website called Distributed Proofreaders
        (http://www.pgdp.net/).  It is run under the umbrella of Project Gutenberg
        (http://www.gutenberg.net/) which is a website with one of the largest
        collections of free old literature in electronic formats.  Distributed
        Proofreaders (DP) allows certain people to provide their own content for the
        site in the form of page images (like our CDs are currently in), and through
        a combined effort, gets converted into electronic text formats (one page at
        a time).  Through this combined effort, they process thousands of pages
        every day, with their online community.  The essense of Project Gutenberg
        (and consequently, DP) is free access for everyone.  All books that go on
        there must be public domain, therefore anyone can download, reformat, and/or
        redistribute books from their site for whatever use imagineable (even for
        profit).

        My son, Jordan has been granted the privilege of providing content for their site (and
        the responsibility of managing through the site).  He has already successfully managed the following books as they went through.  These are Christ, The Way, The Truth, and The Life (John Brown of Wamphray), Auchensaugh Renovation, Act, Declaration, and Testimony, Sketches of the Covenanters (McFeeters), Life of James Renwick (Houston), Divine Right of Church Government (by London Ministers), Notes on the Apocalypse (Steele) which are all up on Project Gutenberg, ready for the public to download.  Some of the titles in first and second round are:  True History of the Church of Scotland - Calderwood, Vindication of Presbyterial Government and Ministry - London Ministers, Acts of the General Assembly,  Covenants & The Covenanters - Kerr, Biographia Scoticana - Howie, Records of the Kirk of Scotland (Part 1 & 2) - Peterkin, Works of George Gillespie (Vol 1 & 2), The Works of Hugh Binning, Booke of the Universall Kirk of Scotland - Peterkin, A Coal from the Altar, to Kindle the Holy Fire of Zeale - Ward, etc.  We are anxious for the completion of these tomes to finally be able to get some of our subordinate standards in searchable form.
         
        This is a great project for everyone to get involved in as it doesn't
        require any great technical computer skills or theological skills to
        participate, but because the aim of the site is for quality of conversion
        rather than quantity, one should be comfortable with their computer and be a
        highly proficient English reader (I wouldn't recommend adolescents, etc).
        Another benefit is, it demands as little or as much time as you want to
        spare.  You can do one page a week or 50 pages a day.  This
        system manages everything and ensures that the book is done as quickly as
        possible.  But by working together, we are being the most productive.

        I mentioned quality.  DP strives to preserve the author's text as much as
        possible.  This includes leaving original spelling, including all footnotes,
        side notes, and illustrations.  We can be confident that our books will come
        out of here in excellent shape.  Far better than many independent projects
        of this nature.

        Jordan's vision for the future of this is to have all of our relevant books
        available in accurate electronic editions within a couple of years.  Aside
        from the effort of the proofreaders, there is work on the part of the
        project manager (Jordan) both before the book goes on the site and after the
        book has been finished on the site.  For that reason, we foresee us probably
        being able to produce one new book per week, which is actually quite
        impressive.  If, at a later point after doing a fair amount of proofreading,
        someone else feels ambitious enough to take on some project management
        roles, then we may even be able to increase that production.

        Thank you for reading this far.  If you want to know more specifics about
        how it works and how you can help out, please see below.  Feel free to
        forward this message if you know of others who may be interested.  If you
        are not interested, and don't know of anyone who is, thank you for your
        time.

        Ginny Dohms
        ________________________


        How Distributed Proofreaders Works:

        I could give a detailed description, but they have already developed an
        excellent summary of how it all works.  It can be found at:
        http://www.pgdp.net/c/faq/ProoferFAQ.php

        Please read all relevant portions of this before moving on to sign up.  It
        will just clear up a lot of questions you'll run into.

        ________________________


        How To Sign Up and Get Started:
        (Please have at least half an hour to an hour available for this, but please
        try it...it's simple once you get going.)

        Instead of using their instructions, I'll make a set specific to us.

        1: Go to http://www.pgdp.net/c/accounts/addproofer.php and enter in the
        appropriate information.

        2: Once you submit the information, a page will come up telling you that you
        have been signed up and may now begin proofing.

        3: Once you click that button in the middle, it will bring you to the main
        DP page.  If you scroll down the page, you will see a listing of all the
        books that are currently available to be proof read.  On the side bar you
        will see some statistics about the site and yourself.

        4: Before you start anything else, go to the following link...
        http://www.pgdp.net/c/stats/teams/tdetail.php?tid=250  This is our team
        page, just a convenient way to keep track of who's signed up and maybe add a
        little bit of friendly competition regarding pages completed.  Right beside
        the Team name (RPNA) and the XML button, there will be a link to "Join".  If
        you click that, it will add you to the team, so your name will appear in the
        list of members.  Before you leave this page, you can check out the team
        "Website" which is listed near the top of the page.  This is a page I
        maintain that simply lists all of the active projects I'm working on, and
        the state they are in.  This is for your information's sake and if you have
        suggestions for other books to do, you can send them to me.  You can now go
        back to the main DP page.

        5: Before you begin proofing, you MUST read the guidelines.  I cannot stress
        the importance of this enough.  For these books to be of any use to us, all
        of our proofreaders must be doing things the same way.  These guidelines can
        be accessed through the "Help" button at the top of every page, in the dark
        green bar.  In there, you'll find the "Proofing Guidelines".  I wouldn't say
        you have to read and remember every detail at the beginning, but at least
        look at and acknowledge every section so you'll know what there are rules
        about and just have it handy when you're doing your first 20-50 pages.  You
        won't run into most of the situations, but some you'll use a lot (italics,
        paragraphs, etc) so eventually you won't have to refer back to the
        guidelines anymore.

        6: Once you feel comfortable with the basic principles and guidelines of the
        proofing, go back to the main page listing all the current projects
        available in the first round.  If you scroll down the list, you may very
        likely see one or two listed with "Wraezor" (myself) as the Project Manager.
        Those are, obviously, our books.  However, for the first 5 or 10 pages that
        you proof, I would suggest doing ones listed as Beginner.  If you look in
        the Genre field, you will see some near the top listed as "BEGINNERS ONLY".
        Don't take this as an insult but as a safe way of getting some practice.
        People will be much more understanding if you make a mistake (or ten) here.
        When these projects move to the second round of proofing, the people who
        check it have much more experience and are encouraged to provide feedback to
        the beginners on what things they missed, so they can improve their skills.

        7: To try your hand at proofing a page, find one that looks good (preferably
        English, unless you're adventurous), and click on the title.  This will
        launch another window, which should take up your whole screen (you'll be
        using all of it, believe me).  At the top of the new window there will be a
        row of links.  If the window does not take up your whole screen, I would
        suggest going into "Interface Preferences" right now and changing it.  There
        are plenty of settings to tweak in here, so you may want to come back later,
        if you want to adjust your interface more to suit your style.  For now, just
        change the resolution, near the top of the left column.  Set it to the
        resolution your monitor is set at, if you know it.  If you don't, just bump
        it up one notch.  Now go to the bottom of the page and click the "Save
        Preferences" button.  Once it brings you back to the initial page you saw
        when you opened the window, close it, then go back to the main DP page
        listing the projects and hit Refresh on your browser.  Once it reloads,
        click on the same book again, and it should have adjusted your resolution to
        your new setting.  (If it's still not quite right, you can go back in and
        tweak it again.)

        8: Once you have your interface the right size, you can begin proofing.  To
        do that, ensure you are in the proofing window (which you enter by clicking
        on a book title and having it launch the new window), then scroll down and
        read the project comments.  Sometimes particular Project Managers want
        proofreaders to deviate from the standard Proofing Guidelines in some
        way...this is where they will list that.  If it all looks normal, scroll
        back up to the top and click "Start Proofing".

        9: This will launch the proofing screen (in a horizontal layout, which you
        can change in your preferences).  At the top you will see the page image,
        and at the bottom you will see the text version in a box.  Once you've proof
        read and corrected it all, according to the guidelines, you can use the
        buttons to move on or stop.  Use the "?" button in the bottom right to make
        sure you know what each button does.

        10: That's about it.  You've done a basic walkthrough of the system.  After
        you have done a few pages and are feeling more comfortable with the
        interface and the guidelines, feel free to try some EASY projects and then
        some of the books I have on there, which are some of the more useful books
        on there, you'll probably find.  With that, I just want to say, thanks so
        much for your help.


        Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday!
        Yahoo! Netrospective: 100 Moments of the Web

      • Ginny Dohms
        Antonio, ... This cannot be done, for a few reasons. These works are all public domain material, so are not copyrightable. Anything over 50 years old loses
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 3, 2005
          Antonio,
           
          >A , brother of our church locally, has talked to me about a way in
          which we can be covered by copyright as it regards >these things if we do something that those in the open source do called copylefting. The reason I have this >concern is that we want to have legal means if a person does reproduce that which is worked so hard on by yourself, >Jordan and others to be preserved as to what was actually retypeset and in no way altered.

          This cannot be done, for a few reasons.  These works are all public domain material, so are not copyrightable.  Anything over 50 years old loses its copyright.  I know you are not talking about the actual books being copywritten, but our work, but am just giving a little background regarding copyrighting in general.  Having said that, we are not the only ones working on these books, so would have no right to copyright the improvements being made.  Many of the other DP volunteers are giving up many, many hours of their time to get these books completed but have absolutely no connection to our church.  For example, one lady has done hundreds and hundreds of pages of proofing on the Book of Universal Kirk, simply because she has a fascination with Scottish historical works.  Not only does DP have 15,000 other proofers on their volunteer list to help with these projects, but they also have great software resources to make this process so much easier.  For us to pull away from them and do it ourselves would be a formidable task and we would never accomplish on our own, what we could do in conjunction with them.  We have put out appeals to other covenanters to help with this project, but we presently have only 6 people who have done any work on these books.  So we need the resources of DP to get our subordinate standards and other great works into a usable format so the elders have quick and easy access to church rulings, acts, etc.  DP's requirements are that once the books are completed, they go on to the Project Gutenberg site.  Then they can be accessed and downloaded by anyone, for any purpose, even for retail purposes, but are not copyright-ed, even at that stage.
           
          >This concern flows from the dishonesty that has been shown time and
          time again by other groups like the PCA, >OPC, etc... that would paste just what is to their purpose and leave out other portions of the text when they feel it is >convenient.
           
          I do not want to attribute dishonesty to these specific groups, as we know any individual of any organization can be guilty of twisting information to try to make a point.  However, these books are already all available for anyone to use, or misuse.  By making them more cut and pastable, we are trying to give a huge benefit to our own elders and membership, not to our enemies.  One thing this will aid in, is if our enemies do try to misquote from these books, it will be very easy to search the document now to point out the error, something that is not easily done presently.  The other side of the coin is, by doing it publicly, and having proofers that are not of our bias, we are less likely to be accused of dishonesty ourselves. I prefer to think of all the good that will come from having these documents in a good format in spreading the truth and allowing people from every corner of the world to have access to some of the greatest writings ever.  If we spend all our time fearing what our enemies may do, we will never continue the work of reformation.  It is our job to press on, be faithful in using these tomes that God has preserved for the church to the best of our ability, and trust God to make it profitable for His Kingdom.
           
          Hope that explains where we are at on this project.....Ginny
        • Antonio Menendez
          Thanks for the further explanation, I understand your perspective a little bit better now. Ginny Dohms wrote:Antonio, ... This cannot be
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 3, 2005
            Thanks for the further explanation, I understand your perspective a little bit better now.

            Ginny Dohms <gdawn@...> wrote:
            Antonio,
             
            >A , brother of our church locally, has talked to me about a way in which we can be covered by copyright as it regards >these things if we do something that those in the open source do called copylefting. The reason I have this >concern is that we want to have legal means if a person does reproduce that which is worked so hard on by yourself, >Jordan and others to be preserved as to what was actually retypeset and in no way altered.

            This cannot be done, for a few reasons.  These works are all public domain material, so are not copyrightable.  Anything over 50 years old loses its copyright.  I know you are not talking about the actual books being copywritten, but our work, but am just giving a little background regarding copyrighting in general.  Having said that, we are not the only ones working on these books, so would have no right to copyright the improvements being made.  Many of the other DP volunteers are giving up many, many hours of their time to get these books completed but have absolutely no connection to our church.  For example, one lady has done hundreds and hundreds of pages of proofing on the Book of Universal Kirk, simply because she has a fascination with Scottish historical works.  Not only does DP have 15,000 other proofers on their volunteer list to help with these projects, but they also have great software resources to make this process so much easier.  For us to pull away from them and do it ourselves would be a formidable task and we would never accomplish on our own, what we could do in conjunction with them.  We have put out appeals to other covenanters to help with this project, but we presently have only 6 people who have done any work on these books.  So we need the resources of DP to get our subordinate standards and other great works into a usable format so the elders have quick and easy access to church rulings, acts, etc.  DP's requirements are that once the books are completed, they go on to the Project Gutenberg site.  Then they can be accessed and downloaded by anyone, for any purpose, even for retail purposes, but are not copyright-ed, even at that stage.
             
            >This concern flows from the dishonesty that has been shown time and time again by other groups like the PCA, >OPC, etc... that would paste just what is to their purpose and leave out other portions of the text when they feel it is >convenient.
             
            I do not want to attribute dishonesty to these specific groups, as we know any individual of any organization can be guilty of twisting information to try to make a point.  However, these books are already all available for anyone to use, or misuse.  By making them more cut and pastable, we are trying to give a huge benefit to our own elders and membership, not to our enemies.  One thing this will aid in, is if our enemies do try to misquote from these books, it will be very easy to search the document now to point out the error, something that is not easily done presently.  The other side of the coin is, by doing it publicly, and having proofers that are not of our bias, we are less likely to be accused of dishonesty ourselves. I prefer to think of all the good that will come from having these documents in a good format in spreading the truth and allowing people from every corner of the world to have access to some of the greatest writings ever.  If we spend all our time fearing what our enemies may do, we will never continue the work of reformation.  It is our job to press on, be faithful in using these tomes that God has preserved for the church to the best of our ability, and trust God to make it profitable for His Kingdom.
             
            Hope that explains where we are at on this project.....Ginny


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