Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Psalmody Question

Expand Messages
  • jmcovenanter
    ... Perhaps what follows will at least supply an answer to the circumstances . Although I cannot respond with the historical insight of thebishopsdoom, by
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 6, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In covenantedreformationclub@yahoogroups.com, sixredheads@j...
      wrote:
      >
      > I am curious as to which of the off-shoot Presbyterian churchs (of
      > Covenanter heritage) first abandoned exclusive psalmody. And what
      > circumstances served as impetus to this defection?
      >
      > Cordially in Christ,
      > DDG


      Perhaps what follows will at least supply an answer to
      the "circumstances". Although I cannot respond with the historical
      insight of thebishopsdoom, by following Iain Murray's, "The Psalter-
      The Only Hymnal?" (Banner of Truth, 2001)there may be an answer. In
      it he cites men of such learning as Thomas Manton, John Flavel, and
      even David Dickson. If these citations are accurate (which we have
      no reason to doubt) I trust at least the circumstances will be
      understood.

      The citations seem to point out that these men did not hold to
      exclusive psalmody. This is a point with which I am ignorant. Murray
      contends that although the men certainly preferred the Psalms, and
      would not have approved much of what passes as hymns today, they
      nonetheless did not ban all uninspired songs from worship. On page
      14 of the booklet he quotes Manton as writing, "I confess we do not
      forbid other songs; if grave and pious, after good advice they may
      be received into the Church." Murray also writes on page 15, "David
      Dickson, the Scots Puritan leader, likewise wrote hymns 'to be sung
      with any common tunes of the Psalms.'"

      Perhaps this helps understand "what circumstances served as impetus
      to this defection". For if these men of great influence at least
      allowed the possibility of singing "uninspired songs", it is easily
      understood how Presbyterian churches began to allow them at large.

      I would be quick to add, I have not checked the context of the
      quotations above in their original setting, and would instantly take
      back this possible "circumstance" if the quotations prove to be out
      of context.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.