Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Membership Card: Morse Code Input

Expand Messages
  • etnyred
    Put together a Membership Card kit with 32k this past week and it s been fun programming Q to flash my name in Morse Code. Now think it would be interesting
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 30, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Put together a Membership Card kit with 32k this past week and it's been fun programming Q to flash my name in Morse Code.

      Now think it would be interesting if I could connect a morse code key to the Membership Card and program it to understand code as I key it: -.-. --- ... -- .- -.-.

      Grand goal is to create a simple adventure game that outputs information to you in morse code, and you interact back using morse code key.

      I'm more of a programmer then hardware guy - so trying to get a "reality check" on this idea.

      Could the more code input come in from a line on the parallel port?

      Let me know what you think...

      Derek
    • ajparent1
      ... I presume you mean Morse code input via parallel entry? Why not use a testable line EF1-4 what ever one is free? Less hardware and there are instructions
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 30, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "etnyred" <etnyred@...> wrote:
        >
        > Put together a Membership Card kit with 32k this past week and it's been fun programming Q to flash my name in Morse Code.
        >
        > Now think it would be interesting if I could connect a morse code key to the Membership Card and program it to understand code as I key it: -.-. --- ... -- .- -.-.
        >
        > Grand goal is to create a simple adventure game that outputs information to you in morse code, and you interact back using morse code key.
        >
        > I'm more of a programmer then hardware guy - so trying to get a "reality check" on this idea.
        >
        > Could the more code input come in from a line on the parallel port?

        I presume you mean Morse code input via parallel entry? Why not use a testable line EF1-4 what ever one is free? Less hardware and there are instructions for direct testing.

        I'd be interested in morse code recognition part myself.

        Allison




        > Let me know what you think...
        >
        > Derek
        >
      • Lee Hart
        ... I think it s a great idea! As an (ex) ham, I already know the Morse code. It would be a great way to learn or practice it. With a little practice, most
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 30, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          On 10/30/2010 12:52 PM, etnyred wrote:
          > Put together a Membership Card kit with 32k this past week and it's been fun programming Q to flash my name in Morse Code.
          >
          > Now think it would be interesting if I could connect a morse code key to the Membership Card and program it to understand code as I key it: -.-. --- ... -- .- -.-.
          >
          > Grand goal is to create a simple adventure game that outputs information to you in morse code, and you interact back using morse code key.
          >
          > I'm more of a programmer then hardware guy - so trying to get a "reality check" on this idea.
          >
          > Could the more code input come in from a line on the parallel port?
          >
          > Let me know what you think...

          I think it's a great idea! As an (ex) ham, I already know the Morse
          code. It would be a great way to learn or practice it. With a little
          practice, most people can send/receive Morse code about as fast as they
          can type or read.

          Something like Zork or the "Colossal Cave" adventure would probably fit
          in 32k if some of the excessively wordy room descriptions were boiled down.

          Most commands are just one or two letters (North South East West Up Down
          Get Hit...) so inputs are quite short. The software automatically
          proceeds after a second with no more sound.


          I think a "bug" input (two switches, one for dots and one for dashes)
          would be better than a straight key input (just 1 switch). Or... how
          about a microphone with a tuned filter to detect a certain frequency
          (the same one that a speaker produces when the Card is sending Morse).
          You *whistle* in your commands! A piezoelectric speaker would be good
          for this, as they are naturally resonant and strongly favor one
          particular frequency.

          --
          Lee A. Hart | Ring the bells that still can ring
          814 8th Ave N | Forget the perfect offering
          Sartell MN 56377 | There is a crack in everything
          leeahart earthlink.net | That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
        • thinkpast
          ... I d be glad to add that program to the Membership Card Web site. ... The INP 4 reads the DB-25 connector as a byte, but there s no reason why you can t AND
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 30, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "etnyred" <etnyred@...> wrote:
            >
            > Put together a Membership Card kit with 32k this past week and it's been fun programming Q to flash my name in Morse Code.

            I'd be glad to add that program to the Membership Card Web site.

            > Now think it would be interesting if I could connect a morse code key to the Membership Card and program it to understand code as I key it: -.-. --- ... -- .- -.-.

            > Could the morse code input come in from a line on the parallel port?

            The INP 4 reads the DB-25 connector as a byte, but there's no reason why you can't AND off one bit - or Lee says use a "bug" and use two wires for two bits. But work on this incrementally, get something done and then add more.

            Try building a cable with a DB-25 connector wired to your code key. DB-25 pin 18 to 25, any of them, are ground. For bit 0 of the INP 4, that's DB-25 pin 2 (looking at the schematic). Otherwise, you could wire into one of the unused EF lines. They are not on the DB-25 connector, you could "borrow" one of the ground pins and wire to that pin instead. Or just wire onto the board itself, less desirable of course, at the 30 pin connector.

            You need to "pull" that pin up to the supply voltage, and down to ground, just like the toggle switches do, so the pin varies from ground to positive. In fact you can build some code just by reading a toggle switch, or the "IN" button to EF4, then change your "input" routine when you have wired something up.

            Consider this. Let's say you use the bit 0 line (pin 2) and ground (pin 18). I suggest you set the D0 toggle switch so the line is "high", pulled up with the internal 100K resistor. Test it with a program. Then make a wire pair on a DB-25 connector, and wire it to a key so the ground is your key ground, and the bit 0 line is shorted by the key to ground. COnfirm with your program that pressing the key, changes the state of the bit.

            The point about that "pulled up" line, is to avoid just wiring an input pin on a long wire with no resistance across it. It's possible that line will pick up stray voltage or noise, and not only trigger your program, it may even do damage to the input! The 100K resistor gives some "load" to require more serious current. And it feeds the line a voltage so your key only needs to bring the line "low" to ground instead of pull it up with a voltage of its own.

            Myself, I'd consider more circuitry but that should be OK, just keep the wire a few foot long, maybe use a coax cable (any will do). Likewise, you can bring out an output to an LED, or a beeper - Q is available on pin 15, or use one of the 4 data output lines on pins 10-13. You'll need a different circuit depending on what you are "driving" with that output. Check the schematic and the (Rev A) Tech Notes on the Web site.

            Once you have the M/S card responding to a keyed input, then you can work on code to recognize long and short inputs. You know, this has been discussed before here in cosmacelf. Read the thread "Arecibo redux" and look at the situation and code there for output. The next step was "input" anyway, so there you are! And, it's an exercise in digital interfacing.

            Herb Johnson
            retrotechnology.com
            http://www.retrotechnology.com/memship/mem_revB.html
          • Lee Hart
            On 10/30/2010 8:13 PM, thinkpast wrote: ... Yes. The 1802 s EF4 input is wired to the parallel port pin 1 (strobe). Just wire your morse code key between pin 1
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 30, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              On 10/30/2010 8:13 PM, thinkpast wrote:
              etnyred wrote:
              >> Could the morse code input come in from a line on the parallel port?

              Yes. The 1802's EF4 input is wired to the parallel port pin 1 (strobe).
              Just wire your morse code key between pin 1 and pin 18-25 (ground).

              As Herb suggests, I'd put a series resistor (1k-10k) between pin 1 and
              your code key. This is to protect against static damage or accidental
              shorts to something.

              When you want to use the Membership Card's IN switch, note that pin 1 of
              the Parallel port connector must be free to be pulled high by the 100k
              pullup resistor in R13.

              --
              Lee A. Hart | Ring the bells that still can ring
              814 8th Ave N | Forget the perfect offering
              Sartell MN 56377 | There is a crack in everything
              leeahart earthlink.net | That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
            • Dennis Boone
              ... Sounds like a neat concept, and it d certainly be good practice. The catch is that machine recognition of morse is fairly hard to do unless the sender is
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 30, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                > Grand goal is to create a simple adventure game that outputs information
                > to you in morse code, and you interact back using morse code key.

                > I'm more of a programmer then hardware guy - so trying to get a "reality
                > check" on this idea.

                Sounds like a neat concept, and it'd certainly be good practice.

                The catch is that machine recognition of morse is fairly hard to do
                unless the sender is pretty clean. You don't have the code space to a
                great deal of "ai". If you're willing to constrain it to paddles, use
                two input pins, and require larger than normal spaces between letters,
                you might be able to make the code fairly simple.

                De
              • Lee Hart
                ... This is why I suggested a keyer, or bug . Hams have used them for decades, long before there were computers. The hardware is pretty simple. There are two
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 30, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  On 10/30/2010 11:38 PM, Dennis Boone wrote:
                  > The catch is that machine recognition of morse is fairly hard to do
                  > unless the sender is pretty clean. You don't have the code space to a
                  > great deal of "ai". If you're willing to constrain it to paddles, use
                  > two input pins, and require larger than normal spaces between letters,
                  > you might be able to make the code fairly simple.

                  This is why I suggested a keyer, or "bug". Hams have used them for
                  decades, long before there were computers. The hardware is pretty simple.

                  There are two switches, one for dots and one for dashes. They are
                  usually mounted horizontally, on a pair of paddles. Operation:

                  - tap the dot switch, and it sends one perfect dot
                  - hold the dot switch, and it sends a string of dots as
                  long as you hold it ('h' is four dots, for example)
                  - tap the dash switch, and it sends one perfect dash
                  (three times longer than a dot)
                  - hold the dash switch, and it sends a string of dashes
                  (zero is 5 dashes, for example)
                  - squeeze the paddle so both switches close at once,
                  and it alternates dot-dash-dot-dash as long as you hold
                  them ('c' is dash-dot-dash-dot for example). The first
                  switch closed determines the first one sent.

                  Since the timings are perfect, a computer has no trouble reading code
                  sent by a keyer.
                  --
                  Lee A. Hart | Ring the bells that still can ring
                  814 8th Ave N | Forget the perfect offering
                  Sartell MN 56377 | There is a crack in everything
                  leeahart earthlink.net | That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
                • Bill Marcum
                  ... I lurk on the m100 mailing list (m100-subscribe [at] list.30below.com), and some folks there have written morse code software for the TRS-80 Model 100, an
                  Message 8 of 8 , Oct 31, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    On Sat, Oct 30, 2010 at 05:52:31PM -0000, etnyred wrote:
                    > Put together a Membership Card kit with 32k this past week and it's
                    > been fun programming Q to flash my name in Morse Code.
                    >
                    > Now think it would be interesting if I could connect a morse code key
                    > to the Membership Card and program it to understand code as I key it:
                    > -.-. --- ... -- .- -.-.
                    >
                    > Grand goal is to create a simple adventure game that outputs
                    > information to you in morse code, and you interact back using morse
                    > code key.
                    >
                    > I'm more of a programmer then hardware guy - so trying to get a
                    > "reality check" on this idea.
                    >
                    > Could the more code input come in from a line on the parallel port?
                    >
                    > Let me know what you think...
                    >
                    > Derek
                    >
                    I lurk on the m100 mailing list (m100-subscribe [at] list.30below.com),
                    and some folks there have written morse code software for the TRS-80
                    Model 100, an early laptop using an 80C85 CPU. The 80C85 and 1802 have
                    little in common other than being 8-bit CMOS microprocessors, but you
                    might get some ideas. Several hams are on that list, so you might come
                    up with other ham radio applications.


                    --
                    "Never underestimate the power of a small tactical nuclear weapon."
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.