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Membership card Rev. B

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  • timgreenowb
    I got my membership card last night! I ve already tried my first mod. My card came with 8K Ram(HM6264). I just happen to have a Dallas Semiconductor DS1225
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 10, 2010
      I got my membership card last night! I've already tried my first mod. My card came with 8K Ram(HM6264). I just happen to have a Dallas Semiconductor DS1225 in my parts box. Its a pin compatible nonvolatile Ram chip. Its supposed to be guaranteed for 10 years. I got mine from some junk equipment at work so I don't know how old it is already.

      The only problem I've had so far with the DS1225 is it doesn't really fit in the socket pins. I had to file the end of the 1802 a little to get it to fit. <:-o Its also too tall for the Altoids tin. But I have a pipe tobacco tin I'm going to use anyway.

      Later,
      Tim
    • rdoerr@bizserve.com
      What you may want to consider trying is the NVRAM from Simtek (now owned by Cypress Semiconductor) Something like the: STK12C68 Series 64K-bit (8K-bit x 8) 5 V
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 11, 2010
        What you may want to consider trying is the NVRAM from Simtek (now owned by Cypress Semiconductor)

        Something like the:

        STK12C68 Series 64K-bit (8K-bit x 8) 5 V 300 mil DIP-28 AutoStore NVSRAM 45 ns

        Should work well. The nice thing about the Simtek chips is that they are the same physical size as the regular SRAM chips and have an even longer retention than the standard NVRAM chips.

        http://www.futureelectronics.com/en/Search.aspx?dsNav=Ny:True,Ro:0,Nea:True,N:716-4294938302

        I've used them in a couple projects and have been very pleased with the way they worked.

        Robert

        -----Original Message-----
        From: "timgreenowb" <timgreenowb@...>
        Sent: Sunday, October 10, 2010 11:11pm
        To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [cosmacelf] Membership card Rev. B

        I got my membership card last night! I've already tried my first mod. My card came with 8K Ram(HM6264). I just happen to have a Dallas Semiconductor DS1225 in my parts box. Its a pin compatible nonvolatile Ram chip. Its supposed to be guaranteed for 10 years. I got mine from some junk equipment at work so I don't know how old it is already.

        The only problem I've had so far with the DS1225 is it doesn't really fit in the socket pins. I had to file the end of the 1802 a little to get it to fit. <:-o Its also too tall for the Altoids tin. But I have a pipe tobacco tin I'm going to use anyway.

        Later,
        Tim







        ------------------------------------

        ========================================================
        Visit the COSMAC ELF website at http://www.cosmacelf.comYahoo! Groups Links
      • timgreenowb
        Oops! I meant I got the membership card running last night. I reread that several times before posting and still missed it. As for the memory chip, anything
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 11, 2010
          Oops! I meant I got the membership card running last night. I reread that several times before posting and still missed it.

          As for the memory chip, anything physically smaller would easier. I already had the DS chip. The one you mention is probably cheaper too.

          The main thing is you can keep your program without having to pull the I/O board off when you power down.

          Thanks,
          Tim

          --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, rdoerr@... wrote:
          >
          > What you may want to consider trying is the NVRAM from Simtek (now owned by Cypress Semiconductor)
          >
          > Something like the:
          >
          > STK12C68 Series 64K-bit (8K-bit x 8) 5 V 300 mil DIP-28 AutoStore NVSRAM 45 ns
          >
          > Should work well. The nice thing about the Simtek chips is that they are the same physical size as the regular SRAM chips and have an even longer retention than the standard NVRAM chips.
          >
          > http://www.futureelectronics.com/en/Search.aspx?dsNav=Ny:True,Ro:0,Nea:True,N:716-4294938302
          >
          > I've used them in a couple projects and have been very pleased with the way they worked.
          >
          > Robert
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: "timgreenowb" <timgreenowb@...>
          > Sent: Sunday, October 10, 2010 11:11pm
          > To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [cosmacelf] Membership card Rev. B
          >
          > I got my membership card last night! I've already tried my first mod. My card came with 8K Ram(HM6264). I just happen to have a Dallas Semiconductor DS1225 in my parts box. Its a pin compatible nonvolatile Ram chip. Its supposed to be guaranteed for 10 years. I got mine from some junk equipment at work so I don't know how old it is already.
          >
          > The only problem I've had so far with the DS1225 is it doesn't really fit in the socket pins. I had to file the end of the 1802 a little to get it to fit. <:-o Its also too tall for the Altoids tin. But I have a pipe tobacco tin I'm going to use anyway.
          >
          > Later,
          > Tim
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > ========================================================
          > Visit the COSMAC ELF website at http://www.cosmacelf.comYahoo! Groups Links
          >
        • Lee Hart
          ... Yeah, the 1802 and RAM are packed tight end-to-end, and still barely fit in the Altoids can. The DS1225 has a coin cell stuck on top of it, which adds to
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 11, 2010
            On 10/10/2010 10:11 PM, timgreenowb wrote:
            > I got my membership card last night! I've already tried my first
            > mod. My card came with 8K Ram(HM6264). I just happen to have a
            > Dallas Semiconductor DS1225 in my parts box. Its a pin compatible
            > nonvolatile Ram chip. Its supposed to be guaranteed for 10 years. I
            > got mine from some junk equipment at work so I don't know how old it
            > is already.
            >
            > The only problem I've had so far with the DS1225 is it doesn't really
            > fit in the socket pins. I had to file the end of the 1802 a little
            > to get it to fit.<:-o Its also too tall for the Altoids tin. But I
            > have a pipe tobacco tin I'm going to use anyway.

            Yeah, the 1802 and RAM are packed tight end-to-end, and still barely fit
            in the Altoids can. The DS1225 has a coin cell stuck on top of it, which
            adds to the height, and there is none to spare.

            RAMtron makes nonvolatile ferroelectric RAMs that are the same size as a
            regular RAM chip. I haven't tried one, but they are a possibility.

            --
            Lee A. Hart | Ring the bells that still can ring
            814 8th Ave N | Forget the perfect offering
            Sartell MN 56377 | There is a crack in everything
            leeahart earthlink.net | That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
          • Lee Hart
            ... The Membership Card has a 600-mil wide memory socket, but an adapter could be made for a 300-mil chip. Off list, Herb Johnson suggested a little adapter
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 11, 2010
              rdoerr@... wrote:
              > consider trying the NVRAM from Simtek (now Cypress Semiconductor)
              > STK12C68 Series 64K-bit (8K-bit x 8) 5 V 300 mil DIP-28 AutoStore
              > NVSRAM 45 ns

              The Membership Card has a 600-mil wide memory socket, but an adapter
              could be made for a 300-mil chip.

              Off list, Herb Johnson suggested a little adapter board that accepts two
              modern surface mount chips, one RAM and one flash ROM. This would give
              you non-volatile storage with cheap modern chips. I didn't do this as I
              was deliberately restricting myself to "old school" chips and
              construction techniques.

              One other point: Consider that an ordinary alkaline AA cell will deliver
              250uA for over a year. That's enough to *run* the Membership Card! Are
              you sure you need nonvolatility longer than that?

              --
              Lee A. Hart | Ring the bells that still can ring
              814 8th Ave N | Forget the perfect offering
              Sartell MN 56377 | There is a crack in everything
              leeahart earthlink.net | That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
            • Lee Hart
              ... You don t have to remove the Front Panel board to go into standby (minimal power consumption). Power connector P4 has 4 pins: pin 1 = positive supply
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 11, 2010
                On 10/11/2010 12:51 PM, timgreenowb wrote:
                > The main thing is you can keep your program without having to pull
                > the I/O board off when you power down.

                You don't have to remove the Front Panel board to go into standby
                (minimal power consumption). Power connector P4 has 4 pins:

                pin 1 = positive supply (3-6v)
                pin 2 = Standby/Run; tie to pin 1 to run, leave it open for standby
                pin 3 = LEDs; tie to pin 4 to enable LEDs, leave it open to disable
                pin 4 = negative supply (3-6v)

                So, for minimum standby power, open the connections between 1-2 and 3-4
                with a switch.

                Or, note that 1v is enough to maintain memory contents, but stops the
                clock and other logic from drawing power.
                --
                Lee A. Hart | Ring the bells that still can ring
                814 8th Ave N | Forget the perfect offering
                Sartell MN 56377 | There is a crack in everything
                leeahart earthlink.net | That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
              • Chuck Bigham
                Is there a way to signal external hardware when data is available at the output port? Other systems I ve used have TPB brought out to signal that data was
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 22, 2010
                  Is there a way to signal external hardware when data is available at the output port? Other systems I've used have TPB brought out to signal that data was available, but it doesn't look like TPB is available on the front panel connector. Does anyone have ideas how external hardware can be signaled?

                  Worst case, I can greenwire TPB to a pin on the 30-pin connector, but I was hoping someone might have a more elegant solution that I'm not seeing.

                  Thanks,
                  Chuck


                  From: Lee Hart
                  Sent: Monday, October 11, 2010 6:43 PM
                  To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [cosmacelf] Re: Membership card Rev. B



                  On 10/11/2010 12:51 PM, timgreenowb wrote:
                  > The main thing is you can keep your program without having to pull
                  > the I/O board off when you power down.

                  You don't have to remove the Front Panel board to go into standby
                  (minimal power consumption). Power connector P4 has 4 pins:

                  pin 1 = positive supply (3-6v)
                  pin 2 = Standby/Run; tie to pin 1 to run, leave it open for standby
                  pin 3 = LEDs; tie to pin 4 to enable LEDs, leave it open to disable
                  pin 4 = negative supply (3-6v)

                  So, for minimum standby power, open the connections between 1-2 and 3-4
                  with a switch.

                  Or, note that 1v is enough to maintain memory contents, but stops the
                  clock and other logic from drawing power.
                  --
                  Lee A. Hart | Ring the bells that still can ring
                  814 8th Ave N | Forget the perfect offering
                  Sartell MN 56377 | There is a crack in everything
                  leeahart earthlink.net | That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Lee Hart
                  ... The Q line can be used. Or use one of the 8 bits as a strobe, i.e. a 7-bit ASCII character with the high bit low, then write the same character with the
                  Message 8 of 8 , Oct 22, 2010
                    On 10/22/2010 8:16 PM, Chuck Bigham wrote:
                    > Is there a way to signal external hardware when data is available
                    > at the output port?

                    The Q line can be used. Or use one of the 8 bits as a strobe, i.e. a
                    7-bit ASCII character with the high bit low, then write the same
                    character with the high bit high.

                    > Worst case, I can greenwire TPB to a pin on the 30-pin connector,

                    That could be done. Use INT or EF1-EF3, for example.

                    --
                    Lee A. Hart | Ring the bells that still can ring
                    814 8th Ave N | Forget the perfect offering
                    Sartell MN 56377 | There is a crack in everything
                    leeahart earthlink.net | That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
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