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Re: Something cool from iFixIt...

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  • ajparent1
    I find it interesting that PC Review would comment something so horribly out of context that had gone by before their selfsame creation. I got mine in
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 1, 2010
      I find it interesting that PC Review would comment something so horribly out of context that had gone by before their selfsame creation. I got mine in something like late '78 roughly 4 years before the IBM PC. Those of us that had "PC"s then called any machine we owned a Personal Computer and the actual hardware could be most anything including PDP11, PDP8, EVK68, Altair, SWTP, COSMAC, KIM and on and on.

      As video games went it was not up the standard of later ones but
      still ahead of many it was current with that relied on fixed
      function game chips. The studio II was programmable and cheaper
      than many of the fancier machines. Then again the games world
      from about 73 to 1980 was moving about the speed of Moore's law and maybe pushing it some.


      Allison


      --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Lee Hart <leeahart@...> wrote:
      >
      > From: Mike Harpe <mike@...>
      > > Since I'm new I thought I would share something to introduce myself!
      > > http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/RCA-Studio-II-Teardown/3527/1
      >
      > Man! They certainly went out of their way to slam the poor thing, didn't they!
      >
      > --
      > Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt the one who is
      > doing it. -- Chinese proverb
      > --
      > Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart-at-earthlink.net
      >
    • wa9hsl
      My thoughts too Allison but I wish that instead of writing a highly critical hindsight piece like that that the individual would have better spent his/her time
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 1, 2010
        My thoughts too Allison but I wish that instead of writing a highly critical hindsight piece like that that the individual would have better spent his/her time with fresh innovation for today.

        My Studio 2 was facinating to me at a time when all sorts of really neat things and technical toys were appearing. Later my unit supplied a nice 1802 and 1861 at a price that was cheaper than the cost of the parts at the time. The chips are still working in a wire-wrapped system but of course now I wish I had the Studio 2 unit back with all it's parts and simplistic games.

        al
        ....

        --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "ajparent1" <kb1gmx@...> wrote:
        >
        > I find it interesting that PC Review would comment something so horribly out of context that had gone by before their selfsame creation. I got mine in something like late '78 roughly 4 years before the IBM PC. Those of us that had "PC"s then called any machine we owned a Personal Computer and the actual hardware could be most anything including PDP11, PDP8, EVK68, Altair, SWTP, COSMAC, KIM and on and on.
        >
        > As video games went it was not up the standard of later ones but
        > still ahead of many it was current with that relied on fixed
        > function game chips. The studio II was programmable and cheaper
        > than many of the fancier machines. Then again the games world
        > from about 73 to 1980 was moving about the speed of Moore's law and maybe pushing it some.
        >
        >
        > Allison
        >
        >
        > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Lee Hart <leeahart@> wrote:
        > >
        > > From: Mike Harpe <mike@>
        > > > Since I'm new I thought I would share something to introduce myself!
        > > > http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/RCA-Studio-II-Teardown/3527/1
        > >
        > > Man! They certainly went out of their way to slam the poor thing, didn't they!
        > >
        > > --
        > > Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt the one who is
        > > doing it. -- Chinese proverb
        > > --
        > > Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart-at-earthlink.net
        > >
        >
      • Lee Hart
        From: wa9hsl ... Or, use the Studio 2 as example of then vs. now. For example, it was made in USA. It used high quality parts. It was easy
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 1, 2010
          From: wa9hsl <wa9hsl@...>
          > I wish that instead of writing a highly critical hindsight piece like
          > that that the individual would have better spent his/her time with
          > fresh innovation for today.

          Or, use the Studio 2 as example of then vs. now. For example, it was made in USA. It used high quality parts. It was easy to open up, used generic parts so it was easy to fix, and reliable enough not to *need* repairs.

          I'll bet that Studio 2 they had still works. What are the chances that any of its contemporary video games, or even an original IBM PC that they lauded still work? What are the chances that *any* of todays glitzy made-in China electronics will work when they are 30 years old?

          --
          Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt the one who is
          doing it. -- Chinese proverb
          --
          Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart-at-earthlink.net
        • Mark Graybill
          Well, IMO PCWorld has never been much of a magazine. They may still be in business, but that s about all you can say for them. They ve spent the past 20-some
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 1, 2010
            Well, IMO PCWorld has never been much of a magazine. They may still be in
            business, but that's about all you can say for them. They've spent the past
            20-some years teaching computer users to be helpless, allow the companies
            they buy from to abuse their trust and their time, to be locked out of their
            own computers for their own good, and to judge the quality of software on
            the basis of how many menu items there are.

            The Studio II was a far better video game than PCWorld has ever been a
            computing magazine, I'd say. :)

            I spend plenty of time in class getting kids out of the PCWorld mindset. We
            get =into= the computers.

            Machine language is part of the "computer applications" class I teach. We
            use an Elf emulator in class, and we program it with the virtual toggle
            switches, starting with the classic 7A 7B 30 00. The web emulation runs slow
            enough that we can see it blink, it works out really well. Even my 10 year
            old students have _no_ problem with it.

            The Studio II is a bit of a closed box, but what I couldn't do with a
            classroom full of VIPs and CHIP-8! :D

            -Mark

            On Wed, Sep 1, 2010 at 10:54 AM, Lee Hart <leeahart@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            > From: wa9hsl <wa9hsl@... <wa9hsl%40yahoo.com>>
            >
            > > I wish that instead of writing a highly critical hindsight piece like
            > > that that the individual would have better spent his/her time with
            > > fresh innovation for today.
            >
            > Or, use the Studio 2 as example of then vs. now. For example, it was made
            > in USA. It used high quality parts. It was easy to open up, used generic
            > parts so it was easy to fix, and reliable enough not to *need* repairs.
            >
            > I'll bet that Studio 2 they had still works. What are the chances that any
            > of its contemporary video games, or even an original IBM PC that they lauded
            > still work? What are the chances that *any* of todays glitzy made-in China
            > electronics will work when they are 30 years old?
            >
            >
            > --
            > Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt the one who is
            > doing it. -- Chinese proverb
            > --
            > Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart-at-earthlink.net
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Mark Graybill
            I should have commented on how nice the teardown article itself was. Thanks for sharing it with us! I m pleased to see the fixit editors liked it, too! There s
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 1, 2010
              I should have commented on how nice the teardown article itself was. Thanks
              for sharing it with us!

              I'm pleased to see the fixit editors liked it, too! There's some folks with
              more class than the lot at PCWorld. ;)

              -Mark


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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