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Pittman's "Short Course" Still Teaches

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  • Dave
    I ve always maintained that Tom Pittman s A Short Course in Programming was a great introduction to bare metal programming, and thanks to Tom s permission
    Message 1 of 2 , May 2, 2010
      I've always maintained that Tom Pittman's "A Short Course in Programming" was a great introduction to bare metal programming, and thanks to Tom's permission and Lee Hart's efforts in converting the book to HTML it's still around, and still teaching anyone interested in learning. Here are a few recent blog entries from someone doing just that:
      <http://www.notanon.com/tag/tinyelf/>

      It brings to mind how that book unfolded for me, teasing with some instruction or another, giving me an example to pique my curiosity, but not *quite* telling me everything before diving in and trying it out. Only when my brain was fully engaged in the strange behavior of some program was the next clue revealed, and then it snapped into place and stuck. It was the right book at exactly the right time, and I doubt it's an exaggeration to say it changed my life.

      If it weren't for that book... well... maybe I would've had a *date* in high school? :)

      Nah. That's crazy talk.
    • Charles Richmond
      ... This reminds me of an analogous thing: Les Paul invented the solid-body electric guitar. Keith Richards, guitarist for the Rolling Stones, once said: If
      Message 2 of 2 , May 2, 2010
        On May 2, 2010, at 10:41 PM, Dave wrote:

        > I've always maintained that Tom Pittman's "A Short Course in
        > Programming" was a great introduction to bare metal programming,
        > and thanks to Tom's permission and Lee Hart's efforts in converting
        > the book to HTML it's still around, and still teaching anyone
        > interested in learning. Here are a few recent blog entries from
        > someone doing just that:
        > <http://www.notanon.com/tag/tinyelf/>
        >
        > It brings to mind how that book unfolded for me, teasing with some
        > instruction or another, giving me an example to pique my curiosity,
        > but not *quite* telling me everything before diving in and trying
        > it out. Only when my brain was fully engaged in the strange
        > behavior of some program was the next clue revealed, and then it
        > snapped into place and stuck. It was the right book at exactly the
        > right time, and I doubt it's an exaggeration to say it changed my
        > life.
        >
        > If it weren't for that book... well... maybe I would've had a
        > *date* in high school? :)
        >
        > Nah. That's crazy talk.
        >
        This reminds me of an analogous thing:

        Les Paul invented the solid-body electric guitar. Keith Richards,
        guitarist for the Rolling Stones, once said: "If Les Paul had never
        lived, we would still all have jobs. But we would be scrubbing toilets."


        Without Tom Pittman, perhaps *you* would now be scrubbing toilets
        instead of programming. :-)

        --
        +----------------------------------------+
        | Charles and Francis Richmond |
        | |
        | plano dot net at aquaporin4 dot com |
        +----------------------------------------+
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