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Re: [cosmacelf] Re: General Questions and Observations

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  • Lee Hart
    ... My situation was very similar. I tried to get the Mark 8 (8008 based computer) working from Radio Electronics, but it was just too difficult. Too little
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 5, 2010
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      wa9hsl wrote:
      > I was first attracted to the 1802 by the 16x16 register array, the
      > builtin DMA structure, cool-running low-power CMOS, mostly two-byte
      > instructions, ease of programming (?), static clock, and lots of room
      > for creativity... I was still groaning with my old original 8008 design
      > with 70 or so support chips and a big hot linear power supply...

      My situation was very similar. I tried to get the "Mark 8" (8008 based
      computer) working from Radio Electronics, but it was just too difficult.
      Too little experience, too many chips, too poor a design, etc.

      Then along comes RCA with the 1802. The sales rep even let me borrow
      their "Microtutor" demo to get me hooked. Then Popular Electronics
      published the Elf (their version of the Microtutor) and away I went!

      I still feel the 1802 is an elegant design. Sure, engineers can always
      add more features. It's easy to encrust chips with so many "features"
      that no one ever really figures out how to use them all. They wind up in
      products that are expensive crash-prone power hogs.

      A design is "done" not when you cannot think of anything more to add;
      but when you can't think of anything more that you can take away. :-)
      --
      Lee A. Hart | Ring the bells that still can ring
      814 8th Ave N | Forget the perfect offering
      Sartell MN 56377 | There is a crack in everything
      leeahart earthlink.net | That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
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