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Considering building an 1802 system

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  • jcwren
    I recently was wandering through the junk store, and came across a tube of CDP1802ACE parts. I didn t grab them, but they ll be there for a while. Seeing
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 22, 2002
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      I recently was wandering through the junk store, and came across a tube of CDP1802ACE parts. I didn't grab them, but they'll be there for a while. Seeing them got me hooked on the idea of building an 1802 system, since it's one of the few microprocessor families I don't have experience with.

      While it might be fun to keep it "authentic" with CDP18xx series RAM and ROMs, that's probably too much trouble. I've got plenty of 2114s, 6116s, and 32K SRAMs laying around to build a fun little 32K or 64K system.

      I saw a reference to a set of schematics at http://www.geocities.com/rgilmanca/, but they seem to be missing. I've sent email to the author, but in the interests of instant gratification, I'm pursuing other avenues. Anyone have any other basic designs that implement > 2K of memory?

      Oh, and I'm also looking for the Forth compiler that was mentioned to be available. I've found a number of references to it, but no links to code.

      --John
    • sncf141r
      Hi Jcwren; ... tube of CDP1802ACE parts. ... Where was this junk store? :-) I wrote to the supplier that has some of the 1802 processors for sale, but they
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 23, 2002
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        Hi Jcwren;

        > I recently was wandering through the junk store, and came across a
        tube of CDP1802ACE parts. ...

        Where was this junk store? :-) I wrote to the supplier that has some
        of the 1802 processors for sale, but they have a minimum order of
        $50.00 US. I only want one, not 10. Maybe you will want to purchase
        them, then sell them off at a slight profit? (hint, hint)

        >
        > While it might be fun to keep it "authentic" with CDP18xx series RAM
        and ROMs, that's probably too much trouble. I've got plenty of 2114s,
        6116s, and 32K SRAMs laying around to build a fun little 32K or 64K
        system.

        Expanding the upper 8 address lines was easy; I think there is a
        schematic from the Popular Electronics series. You can then do a
        number of things to enable or disable memory chips, depending on
        whether you want the full 64k decoded, or if you don't mind simply
        having an either/or for ram/rom.

        Mind you, I have not done this in 20 years, but I remember it as being
        easy... :-)

        John Stewart
        Ottawa.
      • John Chris Wren
        What would be considered a reasonable price for these parts? I ll wander down there later today or tomorrow and pick up as many as possible, based on price.
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 23, 2002
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          What would be considered a reasonable price for these parts? I'll
          wander down there later today or tomorrow and pick up as many as possible,
          based on price.

          Also, on the "tiny" Forth (and cforth, for that matter), are they video
          or serial terminal based? I'd like to try to hunt up some CDP1854s
          (actually, for that matter, if he's got anything else CDP18xx, I'll try to
          grab it. I only recognized the 1802 P/N).

          --John
          -----Original Message-----
          From: Lee Hart [mailto:leeahart@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2002 14:05 PM
          To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [cosmacelf] Considering building an 1802 system


          jcwren wrote:
          > I recently was wandering through the junk store, and came across a
          > tube of CDP1802ACE parts.

          If the price is right, get em! Or tell us where they are so we can :-)

          > While it might be fun to keep it "authentic" with CDP18xx series RAM and
          ROMs, that's probably too much trouble.

          I've got plenty of genuine RCA CMOS RAMs -- 5101 (256x4, as used in the
          original ELF) and 5114 (1024x4, as used in the VIP). I offered to sell
          the 5101's for $0.25 each and the 5114's for $1 each if anyone is
          interested. Contact me directly at the address in my signature lines.

          > ...to build a fun little 32K or 64K system.

          32k would be a HUGE 1802 system!

          > Oh, and I'm also looking for the Forth compiler

          I had the FORTH Inc. polyFORTH system on 8" disks, though currently sent
          them to Stewart Marshall (who's also on this list). I also wrote my own
          "tiny" FORTH called 8TH, which we used in many controller applications.
          --
          Lee A. Hart Ring the bells that still can ring
          814 8th Ave. N. Forget your perfect offering
          Sartell, MN 56377 USA There is a crack in everything
          leeahart_at_earthlink.net That's how the light gets in - Leonard Cohen


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        • Lee Hart
          ... If the price is right, get em! Or tell us where they are so we can :-) ... I ve got plenty of genuine RCA CMOS RAMs -- 5101 (256x4, as used in the original
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 23, 2002
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            jcwren wrote:
            > I recently was wandering through the junk store, and came across a
            > tube of CDP1802ACE parts.

            If the price is right, get em! Or tell us where they are so we can :-)

            > While it might be fun to keep it "authentic" with CDP18xx series RAM and ROMs, that's probably too much trouble.

            I've got plenty of genuine RCA CMOS RAMs -- 5101 (256x4, as used in the
            original ELF) and 5114 (1024x4, as used in the VIP). I offered to sell
            the 5101's for $0.25 each and the 5114's for $1 each if anyone is
            interested. Contact me directly at the address in my signature lines.

            > ...to build a fun little 32K or 64K system.

            32k would be a HUGE 1802 system!

            > Oh, and I'm also looking for the Forth compiler

            I had the FORTH Inc. polyFORTH system on 8" disks, though currently sent
            them to Stewart Marshall (who's also on this list). I also wrote my own
            "tiny" FORTH called 8TH, which we used in many controller applications.
            --
            Lee A. Hart Ring the bells that still can ring
            814 8th Ave. N. Forget your perfect offering
            Sartell, MN 56377 USA There is a crack in everything
            leeahart_at_earthlink.net That's how the light gets in - Leonard Cohen
          • Lee Hart
            ... They sell new for about $20. $5 is probably a reasonable price for surplus parts of unknown heritage. ... FORTH Inc. polyFORTH is distributed in source
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 23, 2002
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              John Chris Wren wrote:
              > What would be considered a reasonable price for these parts?
              > I'll wander down there later today or tomorrow and pick up as many
              > as possible, based on price.

              They sell new for about $20. $5 is probably a reasonable price for
              surplus parts of unknown heritage.

              > Also, on the "tiny" Forth (and cforth, for that matter), are they
              > video or serial terminal based?

              FORTH Inc. polyFORTH is distributed in source code form on 8" disks. To
              bring it up, you write about 40 machine-language primitives, and set up
              hardware to feed the source code to it. It then assembles/compiles
              itself to run with the I/O routines you provided.

              My 8TH fits in a 4k byte EPROM, and is pre-assembled/compiled. It has
              serial I/O routines in it using the 1802's Q and EF4 pins, but they can
              be replaced with some other simple character input/output routine to
              suit your hardware.
              --
              Lee A. Hart Ring the bells that still can ring
              814 8th Ave. N. Forget your perfect offering
              Sartell, MN 56377 USA There is a crack in everything
              leeahart_at_earthlink.net That's how the light gets in - Leonard Cohen
            • allenbsf6502
              ... RAM ... 2114s, ... There was a nice 2-part article describing building a microprocessor development system using the CDP1802 in the April/May 1992 issue of
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 3, 2002
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                --- In cosmacelf@y..., "sncf141r" <luigi@m...> wrote:
                > >
                > > While it might be fun to keep it "authentic" with CDP18xx series
                RAM
                > and ROMs, that's probably too much trouble. I've got plenty of
                2114s,
                > 6116s, and 32K SRAMs laying around to build a fun little 32K or 64K
                > system.
                >
                > Expanding the upper 8 address lines was easy; I think there is a
                > schematic from the Popular Electronics series. You can then do a
                > number of things to enable or disable memory chips, depending on
                > whether you want the full 64k decoded, or if you don't mind simply
                > having an either/or for ram/rom.

                There was a nice 2-part article describing building a microprocessor
                development system using the CDP1802 in the April/May 1992 issue of
                Radio-Electronics. The author is Dave Dage. It has a nice detached
                LED display and 20-key keypad connecting to the Main board using 6-
                wire telephone cord. I got interested in 1802 mainly due to this
                article.

                >
                > Mind you, I have not done this in 20 years, but I remember it as
                being
                > easy... :-)
                >
                > John Stewart
                > Ottawa.


                Allen
              • Lee Hart
                ... I still have lots of genuine RCA MWS5114E3 1kx4 CMOS RAMs (their version of the 2114) and RCA MWS5101LA3 256x4 CMOS RAMs if anyone is interested. Free for
                Message 7 of 10 , Jun 5, 2002
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                  > While it might be fun to keep it "authentic" with CDP18xx series
                  > RAM and ROMs, that's probably too much trouble.

                  I still have lots of genuine RCA MWS5114E3 1kx4 CMOS RAMs (their version
                  of the 2114) and RCA MWS5101LA3 256x4 CMOS RAMs if anyone is interested.
                  Free for the first 2, and $0.25 each for additional ones to anyone
                  building an 1802 computer. Just send me a padded stamped self-addressed
                  envelope (my address is below) with what you want.
                  --
                  Lee A. Hart Ring the bells that still can ring
                  814 8th Ave. N. Forget your perfect offering
                  Sartell, MN 56377 USA There is a crack in everything
                  leeahart_at_earthlink.net That's how the light gets in - Leonard Cohen
                • Jeff Jonas
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 27, 2011
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                    > There was a nice 2-part article describing building a microprocessor
                    > development system using the CDP1802 in the April/May 1992 issue of
                    > Radio-Electronics. The author is Dave Dage. It has a nice detached
                    > LED display and 20-key keypad connecting to the Main board using 6-
                    > wire telephone cord.
                  • Jeff Jonas
                    ... Thanks for that lead! I hope I can find those magazines in the NJ Computer Museum s library, or from some technical library. I just bought a DAGE
                    Message 9 of 10 , May 27, 2011
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                      > There was a nice 2-part article describing building a microprocessor
                      > development system using the CDP1802 in the April/May 1992 issue of
                      > Radio-Electronics. The author is Dave Dage. It has a nice detached
                      > LED display and 20-key keypad connecting to the Main board using 6-
                      > wire telephone cord.

                      Thanks for that lead! I hope I can find those magazines
                      in the NJ Computer Museum's library, or from some technical library.

                      I just bought a "DAGE SCIENTIFIC MC 3" on ebay, but the dopey seller sold the LED/kybd separately :-( I'm kinda hoping the buyer rejects it (it was listed as a Heathkit calculator!), and the ebay seller then gives me a 2nd chance to get it.
                    • WRN
                      Why don t you contact the buyer and seller to see if one or the other would sell it to you, maybe for a small premium. Or, if the buyer thought it was
                      Message 10 of 10 , May 28, 2011
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                        Why don't you contact the buyer and seller to see if one or the other would sell it to you, maybe for a small premium. Or, if the buyer thought it was something else, maybe just to get money back and pay for shipping? Hate to see vintage equipment split up!

                        --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Jonas" <jeff_s_jonas@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > > There was a nice 2-part article describing building a microprocessor
                        > > development system using the CDP1802 in the April/May 1992 issue of
                        > > Radio-Electronics. The author is Dave Dage. It has a nice detached
                        > > LED display and 20-key keypad connecting to the Main board using 6-
                        > > wire telephone cord.
                        >
                        > Thanks for that lead! I hope I can find those magazines
                        > in the NJ Computer Museum's library, or from some technical library.
                        >
                        > I just bought a "DAGE SCIENTIFIC MC 3" on ebay, but the dopey seller sold the LED/kybd separately :-( I'm kinda hoping the buyer rejects it (it was listed as a Heathkit calculator!), and the ebay seller then gives me a 2nd chance to get it.
                        >
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