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David Sarnoff museum and archive split but preserved

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  • thinkpast
    Most of you know the 1802 was developed by RCA in the early 1970 s. You may not know how the former RCA has preserved and exhibited its history. I live in the
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 29, 2009
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      Most of you know the 1802 was developed by RCA in the early 1970's. You may not know how the former RCA has preserved and exhibited its history. I live in the Trenton NJ area not far from that site.

      In today's (Thursday Oct 26) Trenton (NJ) Times daily newspaper, a front page story is about the nearby David Sarnoff (RCA) Library and its archive. For years, the former RCA site, now the Sarnoff Corporation, has maintained a display of RCA technology artifacts and an archive of RCA product development. (This includes the COSMAC 1802, to my general knowledge. ) The library and archive were open to the public and school tours for years. But Sarnoff Corporation - primarily a defense contracting research facility - has found that public access conflicted with its needs for security. A deadline for the end of 2009 was set, to move these from the former RCA site.

      According to the curator of the collection, the Sarnoff family and The College of New Jersey (just outside Trenton and a primarily undergraduate university with engineering and liberal arts programs) have a tentative, unconfirmed agreement to house the *exhibit collection* for display, at the old library on the TCNJ campus. (A new library building is in use today; the old building is under renovation.) A "chance" meeting between Rosita Sarnoff, a granddaughter, and "a TCNJ professor" led to the agreement; legal documents of transfer are in progress. A suggested timeline suggests an exhibit might be in place in mid-2010.

      Meanwhile, the *archives* destination is described as the Hagley Museum and Library in Wilmington DE, a research center founded by the duPont family which "houses millions of documents and items from the history of American business and technology". (That location is about an hour's drive away, down I-95 through Philadelphia.) There were no quotes in the article from representatives of Hagley.

      Herb Johnson
      retrotechnology.com
    • Charles Richmond
      ... David Sarnoff was a *nasty* business man and made unfair business practices... standard operating procedure at RCA. Sort of the Bill Gates of his day. ...
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 29, 2009
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        On Oct 29, 2009, at 7:57 AM, thinkpast wrote:

        > Most of you know the 1802 was developed by RCA in the early 1970's.
        > You may not know how the former RCA has preserved and exhibited its
        > history. I live in the Trenton NJ area not far from that site.

        David Sarnoff was a *nasty* business man and made unfair business
        practices... standard operating procedure at RCA. Sort of the Bill
        Gates of his day.
        > In today's (Thursday Oct 26) Trenton (NJ) Times daily newspaper, a
        > front page story is about the nearby David Sarnoff (RCA) Library
        > and its archive. For years, the former RCA site, now the Sarnoff
        > Corporation, has maintained a display of RCA technology artifacts
        > and an archive of RCA product development. (This includes the
        > COSMAC 1802, to my general knowledge. ) The library and archive
        > were open to the public and school tours for years. But Sarnoff
        > Corporation - primarily a defense contracting research facility -
        > has found that public access conflicted with its needs for
        > security. A deadline for the end of 2009 was set, to move these
        > from the former RCA site.
        >

        I seem to remember a "terminal" built by RCA itself, that used an
        1802 in a small package with a membrane keyboard. It connected to a
        TV set for a display. Is there one of these "terminals" in the RCA
        Museaum???
        >

        --
        +----------------------------------------+
        | Charles and Francis Richmond |
        | |
        | plano dot net at aquaporin4 dot com |
        +----------------------------------------+
      • J.C. Wren
        http://www.smecc.org/rca_microcomputers.htm Is what you re thinking of, I believe. --jc On Thu, Oct 29, 2009 at 10:07 AM, Charles Richmond
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 29, 2009
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          http://www.smecc.org/rca_microcomputers.htm Is what you're thinking of, I
          believe.

          --jc

          On Thu, Oct 29, 2009 at 10:07 AM, Charles Richmond <
          yahoogroups@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          >
          > I seem to remember a "terminal" built by RCA itself, that used an
          > 1802 in a small package with a membrane keyboard. It connected to a
          > TV set for a display. Is there one of these "terminals" in the RCA
          > Museaum???
          > >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • awasson2001
          Yes indeed. They had at least two versions. One is the version shown at the link JC provided. It s a nice little terminal using an 1802. It provides colour
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 29, 2009
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            Yes indeed. They had at least two versions.

            One is the version shown at the link JC provided. It's a nice little terminal using an 1802. It provides colour video to a TV set plus a buss to talk to your computer. The other has a hex keypad on the side but is strictly a keyboard and lacks the terminal hardware.

            I've got one of each and it's pretty neat to fire up the terminal and see it work after all these years.

            Andrew

            --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "J.C. Wren" <jcwren@...> wrote:
            >
            > http://www.smecc.org/rca_microcomputers.htm Is what you're thinking of, I
            > believe.
            >
            > --jc
            >
            > On Thu, Oct 29, 2009 at 10:07 AM, Charles Richmond <
            > yahoogroups@...> wrote:
            >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > I seem to remember a "terminal" built by RCA itself, that used an
            > > 1802 in a small package with a membrane keyboard. It connected to a
            > > TV set for a display. Is there one of these "terminals" in the RCA
            > > Museaum???
            > > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • thinkpast
            I previously posted that the (RCA) David Sarnoff museum and archive was going to be transferred to two locations. Here s an update. Dr. Alexander B. Magoun,
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 8, 2009
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              I previously posted that the (RCA) David Sarnoff museum and archive was going to be transferred to two locations. Here's an update.

              Dr. Alexander B. Magoun, Curator and Executive Director of the David Sarnoff Library, told me: "The [Sarnoff] Library's collections contain the Princeton technical reports and engineering memos, some photos, an incomplete and uncatalogued collection of RCA Solid-State Division reports, some press releases, manuals, some lab notebooks of participants, interviews with B.J. Call and Joyce and Jean Weisbecker, and most substantially the papers of Joe Weisbecker. Joyce and Jean Weisbecker donated these in two sets, one of which has been organized and catalogued."

              Dr. Magoun confirms the general description that the archive, some 2000 cubic feet of material, will go to the Hagley Library in Wilmington DE. He is unsure of their schedule for processing and availability. Artifacts previously on display at Sarnoff - including a ceramic 1802 from Weisbecker and Call - will go to The College of New Jersey. TCNJ has some plans for display in 2010 at West Hall, a building previously used as their library.

              If anyone has additional materials or interest in these archives and artifacts, Dr. Magoun suggests contacting the institutions mentioned. He notes "the missing part of this story is Andy Dingwall's work in reducing Weisbecker's design to an actual chip. That took place in Somerville [NJ] and Dingwall died earlier this decade."

              As I make use of TCNJ and live nearby, I can report on any activities there and possibly find appropriate contacts. I know nothing about the Hagley Library but I'll see if I can find a contact there. I'll update this thread accordingly. If there is sufficient interest, I'll generate a Web page on my retrotechnology.com Web site, and link to it from Lee Hart's "membership" 1802 project page which I host and edit.

              Herb Johnson
              retrotechnology.com
              go to that Web site to contact me
            • cwardell2000
              This is interesting stuff Herb, Thanks I had never given much thought to all the effort that goes into producing a chip from the intial logic design. It s sad
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 8, 2009
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                This is interesting stuff Herb, Thanks

                I had never given much thought to all the effort that goes into producing a chip from the intial logic design. It's sad that many of those that brought us our favorite little 8-bit micro are gone.

                Chris Wardell




                --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "thinkpast" <hjohnson@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > I previously posted that the (RCA) David Sarnoff museum and archive was going to be transferred to two locations. Here's an update.
                >
                > Dr. Alexander B. Magoun, Curator and Executive Director of the David Sarnoff Library, told me: "The [Sarnoff] Library's collections contain the Princeton technical reports and engineering memos, some photos, an incomplete and uncatalogued collection of RCA Solid-State Division reports, some press releases, manuals, some lab notebooks of participants, interviews with B.J. Call and Joyce and Jean Weisbecker, and most substantially the papers of Joe Weisbecker. Joyce and Jean Weisbecker donated these in two sets, one of which has been organized and catalogued."
                >
                > Dr. Magoun confirms the general description that the archive, some 2000 cubic feet of material, will go to the Hagley Library in Wilmington DE. He is unsure of their schedule for processing and availability. Artifacts previously on display at Sarnoff - including a ceramic 1802 from Weisbecker and Call - will go to The College of New Jersey. TCNJ has some plans for display in 2010 at West Hall, a building previously used as their library.
                >
                > If anyone has additional materials or interest in these archives and artifacts, Dr. Magoun suggests contacting the institutions mentioned. He notes "the missing part of this story is Andy Dingwall's work in reducing Weisbecker's design to an actual chip. That took place in Somerville [NJ] and Dingwall died earlier this decade."
                >
                > As I make use of TCNJ and live nearby, I can report on any activities there and possibly find appropriate contacts. I know nothing about the Hagley Library but I'll see if I can find a contact there. I'll update this thread accordingly. If there is sufficient interest, I'll generate a Web page on my retrotechnology.com Web site, and link to it from Lee Hart's "membership" 1802 project page which I host and edit.
                >
                > Herb Johnson
                > retrotechnology.com
                > go to that Web site to contact me
                >
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