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Re: [cosmacelf] Re: Microtutor II: a modern microcomputer trainer

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  • KB
    Very interesting...Schematic? We could probably get that to look like an ELF! ... From: awasson2001 Subject: [cosmacelf] Re: Microtutor
    Message 1 of 47 , Oct 6, 2009
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      Very interesting...Schematic? We could probably get that to look like an ELF!

      --- On Tue, 10/6/09, awasson2001 <andrew@...> wrote:


      From: awasson2001 <andrew@...>
      Subject: [cosmacelf] Re: Microtutor II: a modern microcomputer trainer
      To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2009, 12:14 AM


       





      --- In cosmacelf@yahoogrou ps.com, Lee Hart <leeahart@.. .> wrote:
      > Yes; that's the direction I'm leaning. A real 1802 is an expensive
      > scarce 40-pin chip. A PIC programmed to emulate an 1802 is much cheaper,
      > and with a serial bus is much easier to wire up. Someone (I forget who;
      > will have to look it up) has already done most of this.

      Lee it was Kevin Timmerman...
      Check it out: http://www.compendi umarcana. com/CDP1802/ CC1802.PNG

      He sent me an 8 pin Pic several years ago with the 1802 instruction set, programmed to talk to a terminal over serial bus and echo back any key entered.

      He provided a listing too:
      http://www.Compendi umArcana. com/CDP1802/ PIC1802.asm

      Andrew



















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • William Donnelly
      I think someone already did that. But I don t think they finished it. They were going to do an 1861, on-chip, too. And one of the PIC or Arduino clones runs
      Message 47 of 47 , Mar 31, 2013
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        I think someone already did that. But I don't think they finished it.
        They were going to do an 1861, on-chip, too.

        And one of the PIC or Arduino clones runs pretty fast, if I'm
        remembering correctly.

        It's really not that hard to simulate an 1802. Harder to fully hardware
        emulate it.
        Getting all of the low-level signals to work like an 1802 is a challenge.
        If you need that low-level compatibility.
        If it more or less runs the software, and that's all you really care
        about, then that
        makes it a bit easier.

        You could use any modern (-ish) CPU and probably create a really fast 1802.
        If you used a 68000, or older intel, or fast Z80, or maybe 8085,
        something like that,
        you should be able to make a pretty zippy 1802.

        – Bill
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