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Re: Membership "card"

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  • awasson2001
    Lee this project really sounds great and a very inexpensive way to get into the hobby of microcontrollers and cpus. I ve got some Stamps and SX s (Ubicom
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 4, 2005
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      Lee this project really sounds great and a very inexpensive way to get
      into the hobby of microcontrollers and cpus. I've got some Stamps and
      SX's (Ubicom chips) and they actually cost a bit more to get into than
      your Membership Card.

      I'd love to build a little robot controller with an 1802. I've got a
      really nice discrete H Bridge circuit to handle motors 2 inputs per
      motor and if I can find it I also found a neat one wire motor control
      using an opto-isolator. ll small load stuff but pretty mcuh perfect
      for what you're doing. If I find the one wire job I'll upload it to my
      Photos section.

      Cheers,
      Andrew

      --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Lee Hart <leeahart@e...> wrote:
      > Thomas Miller wrote:
      > > I really like your "membership card" project. The whole idea of
      > > programming an 1802 anywhere anytime with "AA" batteries or even
      > > solar cells appeals to me.
      >
      > Thanks! I'm finding it a fun project, too.
      >
      > PS: I was playing today with a surplus calculator solar panel. In room
      > light (four 402 fluorescent lights in a diffused ceiling fixture in my
      > workshop) it produced 3.5v at 40uA. This turned out to be enough to
      > light some ultrabright red and white LEDs I have! Just barely; but they
      > were visible!
      >
      > All the white LEDs lit at this current. Only about 1 in 5 red LEDs lit,
      > but they were much easier to see because of the distinctive color. So,
      > it looks possible to build a micropower (sub-milliamp) Elf with LEDs.
      >
      > > a dumb question though... why the parallel port? Seems like it's
      > > just adding complication to the circuit, especially considering
      > > the size. Plus requiring software on the PC side.
      >
      > It only added one IC, and a resistor pack. In return for this, I can
      > download programs into the Elf from a PC.
      >
      > I'll start my son off entering programs "stand-alone", using the front
      > panel switches and LEDs. Then, introduce him to downloading it from a
      > PC. Then, get something like tiny BASIC going, with the PC serving as
      > the Elf's keyboard and terminal.
      >
      > My own interest is to use this card to build BEAM robots -- tiny
      > solar-powered robots. The Membership card's nine outputs can run four
      > little motors, for example; and the inputs can monitor "bump" switches
      > and light sensors.
      > --
      > "Never doubt that the work of a small group of thoughtful, committed
      > citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever
      > has!" -- Margaret Mead
      > --
      > Lee A. Hart 814 8th Ave N Sartell MN 56377 leeahart_at_earthlink.net
    • Lee Hart
      ... Yes; you need a PC and about $100 to get into the BASIC Stamps. Course, they have nice manuals and a lot of hardware and software out there :-) ... Great!
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 4, 2005
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        awasson2001 wrote:
        > Lee this project really sounds great and a very inexpensive way to get
        > into the hobby of microcontrollers and cpus. I've got some Stamps and
        > SX's (Ubicom chips) and they actually cost a bit more to get into than
        > your Membership Card.

        Yes; you need a PC and about $100 to get into the BASIC Stamps. 'Course,
        they have nice manuals and a lot of hardware and software out there :-)

        > I'd love to build a little robot controller with an 1802. I've got a
        > really nice discrete H Bridge circuit to handle motors 2 inputs per
        > motor and if I can find it I also found a neat one wire motor control
        > using an opto-isolator. All small load stuff but pretty much perfect
        > for what you're doing. If I find the one wire job I'll upload it to my
        > Photos section.

        Great!

        What I have are a handful of $1 motors from America Science and Surplus
        that run on 1v, draw 10ma no-load, and about 100ma at stall. A 74HC373
        can easily drive them directly with light loading (it limits current to
        about 40-50ma). Connecting a motor between 2 output bits lets me turn it
        on/off and run it in either direction, so I can run up to 4 motors.
        --
        "Never doubt that the work of a small group of thoughtful, committed
        citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever
        has!" -- Margaret Mead
        --
        Lee A. Hart 814 8th Ave N Sartell MN 56377 leeahart_at_earthlink.net
      • awasson2001
        I just received a reply from Quest Electronics www.quest-comp.com regarding the MC14495P1 Display Driver. They can supply the chip for $8.50 each. I m not sure
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 5, 2005
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          I just received a reply from Quest Electronics www.quest-comp.com
          regarding the MC14495P1 Display Driver.

          They can supply the chip for $8.50 each. I'm not sure about quantities
          for minimum orders. I'm also trying to get a quote from another source
          (IC Components) but they are less than helpfull so I'll see if I can
          find another source.

          Cheers,
          Andrew


          --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Lee Hart <leeahart@e...> wrote:
          > awasson2001 wrote:
          > > Lee this project really sounds great and a very inexpensive way to get
          > > into the hobby of microcontrollers and cpus. I've got some Stamps and
          > > SX's (Ubicom chips) and they actually cost a bit more to get into than
          > > your Membership Card.
          >
          > Yes; you need a PC and about $100 to get into the BASIC Stamps. 'Course,
          > they have nice manuals and a lot of hardware and software out there :-)
          >
          > > I'd love to build a little robot controller with an 1802. I've got a
          > > really nice discrete H Bridge circuit to handle motors 2 inputs per
          > > motor and if I can find it I also found a neat one wire motor control
          > > using an opto-isolator. All small load stuff but pretty much perfect
          > > for what you're doing. If I find the one wire job I'll upload it to my
          > > Photos section.
          >
          > Great!
          >
          > What I have are a handful of $1 motors from America Science and Surplus
          > that run on 1v, draw 10ma no-load, and about 100ma at stall. A 74HC373
          > can easily drive them directly with light loading (it limits current to
          > about 40-50ma). Connecting a motor between 2 output bits lets me turn it
          > on/off and run it in either direction, so I can run up to 4 motors.
          > --
          > "Never doubt that the work of a small group of thoughtful, committed
          > citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever
          > has!" -- Margaret Mead
          > --
          > Lee A. Hart 814 8th Ave N Sartell MN 56377 leeahart_at_earthlink.net
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