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Re: 1802 Robot?

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  • Mike
    Re: 1802 Robot? Lee, that s remarkable! I remember reading some information in the magazines about Itsabox! Do you still have one, or any photos of it, or
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 2, 2002
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      Re: 1802 Robot?

      Lee, that's remarkable! I remember reading some information in
      the magazines about Itsabox! Do you still have one, or any
      photos of it, or schematics? It would be great if you could post
      any information here. Thanks sincerely.

      Mike
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/toddler_robot/





      --- In cosmacelf@y..., Lee Hart <leeahart@e...> wrote:
      > Mike wrote:
      > >
      > > I've posted information about a new Walking Humanoid
      Robot at
      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/toddler_robot/
      > >
      > > Then I started thinking, robots were popular in 1984 at the
      > > Worlds First International Personal Robotics Conference
      (IPRC)
      > > in Albuquerque, NM.
      > >
      > > So now I wonder, were any personal robots built using the
      > > RCA1802 chip???
      >
      > Yes!
      >
      > In the 1980's I worked for Technical Micro Systems Inc, a
      company that
      > (among other things) built industrial controllers using the
      1802. We
      > sold the BASYS boards that have been mentioned before.
      >
      > The company had a booth at the West Coast Computer Faire
      in 1982., and
      > wanted something flashy to show off. Of course, they thought of
      this a
      > week before the show, and wanted me to whip something up
      in a hurry.
      >
      > I put a BASYS board, batteries, two stepper motors, several
      switches,
      > and a speaker in a box. Like the turtle robots used for Logo, it
      was
      > about 5" x 7" x 3", with a wheel on the left and right sides, "toes"
      > with switches under the front and rear, and a fixed "hand" with
      left and
      > right feelers, also sensed with switches. I named it "Itsabox"
      (it's a
      > box turtle robot, get it? :-)
      >
      > It was programmed in 8TH (our version of FORTH). The
      quickie program had
      > it move forward, playing a silly song. If its toe went off the edge
      of
      > the table, it said "ooops", backed up, turned a random amount,
      and
      > resumed going forward. If its fingers bumped something, it
      said "oh-oh",
      > backed up, turned a random amount, and resumed.
      >
      > It had a little "TMSI" flag, and just marched around the table to
      get
      > attention. The idea was to show that our BASYS board really
      was a
      > single-board computer; it could do all this with no off-board
      parts at
      > all.
      >
      > As it turned out, our booth just happened to be right across the
      aisle
      > from Heathkit's. And, this just happened to be the show where
      they
      > introduced their "Hero" robot. Their booth was mobbed!
      >
      > But the Hero had no toe or finger switches; they had it on a
      table with
      > 6" barriers on all four sides. Even so, it was so tall that it fell off
      > the table a couple times, quit working, and became just a
      display model.
      >
      > And here we were, with Itsabox happily running around the
      table, never
      > falling off, never getting stuck. We too were mobbed with
      interest. "How
      > much?" I don't know; we didn't price it out. "Where can I buy it?"
      No
      > place; it's just a demo.
      >
      > We did sell a lot of BASYS boards, with a quickly copied "app
      note" with
      > the Itsabox schematic and program listing.
      >
      > In hindsight, we probably should have made it into a product.
      But TMSI
      > wasn't interested in that market; they just wanted to build
      industrial
      > controllers.
      > --
      > Lee A. Hart Ring the bells that still can ring
      > 814 8th Ave. N. Forget your perfect offering
      > Sartell, MN 56377 USA There is a crack in everything
      > leeahart_at_earthlink.net That's how the light gets in - Leonard
      Cohen
    • J.C. Wren
      I also have a copy of Jeff Dunntemann s Captain Cosmo s Whizbang , which is a wonderfully witty newsletter/book on building 1802 gadgets... This sounds
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 2, 2002
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        "I also have a copy of Jeff Dunntemann's "Captain Cosmo's Whizbang",
        which is a wonderfully witty newsletter/book on building 1802 gadgets..."

        This sounds rather intruiging!

        --John



        -----Original Message-----
        From: Lee Hart [mailto:leeahart@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, October 02, 2002 22:10
        To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [cosmacelf] Re: 1802 Robot?


        Mike wrote:
        >
        > Re: 1802 Robot?
        >
        > Lee, that's remarkable! I remember reading some information in
        > the magazines about Itsabox! Do you still have one, or any
        > photos of it, or schematics? It would be great if you could post
        > any information here. Thanks sincerely.

        We built a few of them, all different (mainly built with whatever box,
        motors, etc. were handy at the time). I still have copies of the
        software schematic, and application note. I still have my own version of
        Itsabox, which is somewhat larger and used an RCA VIP so it could
        display a "face" on a 5" TV set. I don't have a scanner, but will see if
        any of this information is already in digital format so I can post it.

        I also have a copy of Jeff Dunntemann's "Captain Cosmo's Whizbang",
        which is a wonderfully witty newsletter/book on building 1802 gadgets,
        and a robot in particular (the "Cosmo" in the name). I got permission
        from Jeff to post it, but haven't figured out how to do it so far. It is
        mostly text, and so should be converted to HTML etc. or the download
        size will be enormous.
        --
        Lee A. Hart Ring the bells that still can ring
        814 8th Ave. N. Forget your perfect offering
        Sartell, MN 56377 USA There is a crack in everything
        leeahart_at_earthlink.net That's how the light gets in - Leonard Cohen


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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lee Hart
        ... We built a few of them, all different (mainly built with whatever box, motors, etc. were handy at the time). I still have copies of the software schematic,
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 2, 2002
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          Mike wrote:
          >
          > Re: 1802 Robot?
          >
          > Lee, that's remarkable! I remember reading some information in
          > the magazines about Itsabox! Do you still have one, or any
          > photos of it, or schematics? It would be great if you could post
          > any information here. Thanks sincerely.

          We built a few of them, all different (mainly built with whatever box,
          motors, etc. were handy at the time). I still have copies of the
          software schematic, and application note. I still have my own version of
          Itsabox, which is somewhat larger and used an RCA VIP so it could
          display a "face" on a 5" TV set. I don't have a scanner, but will see if
          any of this information is already in digital format so I can post it.

          I also have a copy of Jeff Dunntemann's "Captain Cosmo's Whizbang",
          which is a wonderfully witty newsletter/book on building 1802 gadgets,
          and a robot in particular (the "Cosmo" in the name). I got permission
          from Jeff to post it, but haven't figured out how to do it so far. It is
          mostly text, and so should be converted to HTML etc. or the download
          size will be enormous.
          --
          Lee A. Hart Ring the bells that still can ring
          814 8th Ave. N. Forget your perfect offering
          Sartell, MN 56377 USA There is a crack in everything
          leeahart_at_earthlink.net That's how the light gets in - Leonard Cohen
        • stew_m_3
          Hello All, For any of you interested in playing around with robotics on a VERY small budget, a great way to build some nifty little gadgets is to use the heavy
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 4, 2002
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            Hello All,

            For any of you interested in playing around with robotics on a
            VERY small budget, a great way to build some nifty little gadgets is to
            use the heavy duty stepper motors out of old 5-1/4 in. TEAC floppy
            drives removed from old junk PC's. You can get these for just about
            nothing. And keep the little logic board from each drive and the tiny
            ribbon cable that connects it to the stepper. This small logic board
            handles all the control of the stepper motor so that you only need
            maybe four wires soldered to the spade connector for full control. A
            step pulse wire, a direction wire, a power wire, and a ground are all
            that I remember are needed for each motor and board. You can tie two
            or three of these stepper assemblies to a single PC parallel port for
            X,Y or X,Y,Z axis work with various small devices and the programming
            is pretty simple. Likewise they can be easily tied to an ELF. The
            floppy drives also have some other neat components that can be saved
            such as the optical sensors for reading the index hole and the limit of
            the head travel. And all sorts of neat gears, small limit switches,
            and other goodies can be scrounged for use with these steppers by
            junking out old dot matrix printers that are lying about any thrift
            store and recycle yard. (The steppers themselves from the printers are
            not so useful, being various weird voltages and with more complicated
            logic supporting them; but most of the time their shaft size is the
            same as the floppy steppers). Have fun!

            Stewart Marshall
          • laymanjeff
            ... Indeed. Back in 1977 I started work on a robot I called Cosmo Klein, and he had two separate COSMAC systems in him: One a wire-wrapped custom job with
            Message 5 of 11 , Nov 3, 2002
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              --- In cosmacelf@y..., "Mike" <mikegotis@y...> wrote:
              > I've posted information about a new Walking Humanoid Robot at
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/toddler_robot/
              >
              > Then I started thinking, robots were popular in 1984 at the
              > Worlds First International Personal Robotics Conference (IPRC)
              > in Albuquerque, NM.
              >
              > So now I wonder, were any personal robots built using the
              > RCA1802 chip???
              >
              > -Mike

              Indeed. Back in 1977 I started work on a robot I called Cosmo Klein,
              and he had two separate COSMAC systems in him: One a wire-wrapped
              custom job with 2,560 bytes of RAM, the other a COSMAC VIP single
              board commercial machine from RCA, to handle an animated video face.

              Cosmo rolled around under radio control, using touchtones generated
              by an amateur radio 146 MHz handie-talkie (I was WB9MQY at that time;
              now K7JPD) and a crystal controlled FM receiver with a touchtone
              decoder. He was good size, and powerful, with two wheelchair motors
              and a full-sized car battery for power. I wrote an elaborate animated
              face program for the VIP that featured moving eyes and eyebrows and
              several different mouth expressions, plus a gonzo feature that
              watched a port, and when it received a signal from the touchtone
              decoder, made him lick his chops.

              Cosmo and I and my wife Carol actually made it into an article that
              ran in Look magazine around Easter 1980. There's a scan of the photo
              at this URL:

              http://incolor.inebraska.com/bill_r/cosmo_klein.htm

              We also got onto a late-night cable TV program in Chicago in late
              1978, in which Cosmo was seen running around our livingroom until he
              ran over a screwdriver I had left lying on the floor and toppled over
              on his side. He wasn't damaged, but his topheavy nature made it
              difficult to take him places and show him off.

              I got a "real" computer at the end of 1979 and sort of lost interest
              in Cosmo, but he's still out in the garage almost 25 years later, and
              the VIP still works, or did a couple of years ago.

              My friend Lee Hart had a little COSMAC-based robot called (I think)
              Itsabot, which had FORTH on ROM and ran around tables looking for the
              edge. He brought it out to our house in Rochester NY in the early
              80's and it drove my dog Mr. Byte nuts.

              I wonder if anybody here ever saw the little booklet I published in
              mid-1979 called "Captain Cosmo's Whizbang"? 26 pages full of code and
              tips on the 1802, with cartoons of Cosmo Klein the robot and some
              really silly jokes. I actually sold about 200 copies for $5 each and
              had a lot of fun. If I could figure out how to post it on the Web I
              would.

              And if anybody would make a really fast 1802, I might go back to
              embedded systems hacking using that and not PIC.

              --73--

              --Jeff Duntemann K7JPD
              Scottsdale, Arizona
            • cdp1861
              I wonder if anybody here ever saw the little booklet I published in ... and ... and ... Yes, I ve seen it. I ordered it from you back then. Perhaps I still
              Message 6 of 11 , Nov 3, 2002
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                I wonder if anybody here ever saw the little booklet I published in
                > mid-1979 called "Captain Cosmo's Whizbang"? 26 pages full of code
                and
                > tips on the 1802, with cartoons of Cosmo Klein the robot and some
                > really silly jokes. I actually sold about 200 copies for $5 each
                and
                > had a lot of fun.

                Yes, I've seen it. I ordered it from you back then. Perhaps I still
                have it, but all Elf related documents seem to have gotten lost in
                the attic. At least I still got my Elf.

                Richard
              • erd_6502 <erd_6502@yahoo.com>
                ... The first 1802 system I ever saw was built by a friend of mine when I was a kid (c. 1978). He put the Quest Elf board in a 1 sq ft aluminum box, added a
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 24, 2003
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                  --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "Mike" <mikegotis@y...> wrote:
                  > So now I wonder, were any personal robots built using the
                  > RCA1802 chip???
                  >
                  > -Mike

                  The first 1802 system I ever saw was built by a friend of mine when
                  I was a kid (c. 1978). He put the Quest Elf board in a 1 sq ft
                  aluminum box, added a homebrew 8-bit input port board, an 8-bit
                  output board (on 44-pin Radio Shack prototype boards), and
                  placed the entire thing on top of a 3' frame with two DC motors
                  and bump sensors on all 4 sides.

                  The software was somewhat trivial; the machine was unexpanded,
                  so when the bump-map went over $00FF, it cycled around (no
                  upper address latch) and began eating its own initialization
                  code. It would die when the map storage overwrote the top of
                  the main loop.

                  It was named Sidney.

                  For a number of years, I had "Sidney's Brain", the aluminum box,
                  at my house. I gave it back a few years ago and have not yet
                  reproduced his front panel to go with my Quest Elf (TIL311s
                  and switches in a plastic box at the end of a hand-made 24-pin
                  cable).

                  Sidney was replaced with, IIRC, Audrey, a lower, wider robot
                  with an Ohio Scientific SuperBoard for a controller.

                  It was amazing what you could do with 4 input switches, 4 motor
                  drivers and 256 bytes of RAM.

                  -ethan
                • whd_whd_whd
                  Has Captain Cosmo s Whizbang been posted anywhere?
                  Message 8 of 11 , Aug 18 12:47 AM
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                    Has "Captain Cosmo's Whizbang" been posted anywhere?

                    --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Lee Hart <leeahart@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Mike wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Re: 1802 Robot?
                    > >
                    > > Lee, that's remarkable! I remember reading some information in
                    > > the magazines about Itsabox! Do you still have one, or any
                    > > photos of it, or schematics? It would be great if you could post
                    > > any information here. Thanks sincerely.
                    >
                    > We built a few of them, all different (mainly built with whatever box,
                    > motors, etc. were handy at the time). I still have copies of the
                    > software schematic, and application note. I still have my own version of
                    > Itsabox, which is somewhat larger and used an RCA VIP so it could
                    > display a "face" on a 5" TV set. I don't have a scanner, but will see if
                    > any of this information is already in digital format so I can post it.
                    >
                    > I also have a copy of Jeff Dunntemann's "Captain Cosmo's Whizbang",
                    > which is a wonderfully witty newsletter/book on building 1802 gadgets,
                    > and a robot in particular (the "Cosmo" in the name). I got permission
                    > from Jeff to post it, but haven't figured out how to do it so far. It is
                    > mostly text, and so should be converted to HTML etc. or the download
                    > size will be enormous.
                    > --
                    > Lee A. Hart Ring the bells that still can ring
                    > 814 8th Ave. N. Forget your perfect offering
                    > Sartell, MN 56377 USA There is a crack in everything
                    > leeahart_at_earthlink.net That's how the light gets in - Leonard Cohen
                    >
                  • Lee Hart
                    From: whd_whd_whd ... I started it, but haven t gotten very far. Much of the material is very dated, and so needs to be updated to be
                    Message 9 of 11 , Aug 18 8:14 AM
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                      From: whd_whd_whd <bd@...>
                      > Has "Captain Cosmo's Whizbang" been posted anywhere?

                      I started it, but haven't gotten very far. Much of the material is very dated, and so needs to be updated to be of any use beyond idle curiosity.

                      I am working on Tom Pittman's "First Book of Tiny BASIC" too, and want to get that done first. That one is almost finished.

                      --
                      Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt the one who is
                      doing it. -- Chinese proverb
                      --
                      Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart-at-earthlink.net
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