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Re: Does anybody have any 1861 chips for sale or trade?

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  • erd_6502
    ... I have the Studio II (free from a friend), and a few carts ($5 each at the Dayton Hamfest)... what I wish I had is the fabled instructions I ve heard about
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 1, 2004
      --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "wa9hsl" <wa9hsl@a...> wrote:
      >
      > The first TA10171V1 chips that I saw came from RCA Studio II
      > video games. I have two of the chips that were removed from
      > the Studio II games but sorry, they aren't for sale. I
      > really wish I had one of the old Studio II games back along with
      > some catridges but that's hind-sight for you!

      I have the Studio II (free from a friend), and a few carts ($5 each
      at the Dayton Hamfest)... what I wish I had is the fabled
      instructions I've heard about to build a "computer cartridge" that
      is supposed to turn the Studio II into an Elf-like computer. I don't
      know much about it, but would love to see the plans.

      -ethan
    • Alfred R. Winfrey
      Hi Ethan! The simple games on the Studio II were fun even though the Atari games of that time period were more elaborate and had better resolution. There were
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 2, 2004
        Hi Ethan!

        The simple games on the Studio II were fun even though the Atari games
        of that time period were more elaborate and had better resolution.
        There were rumors about an Elf simulation on the Studio II for a while
        but I never saw an actual writeup.

        One short fall with using the Studio II as an Elf might be the limited
        pinouts available on the cartridge connector. For example, it's
        unclear to me if they brought out the N lines and other timing signals
        and whether or not the Studio II internal decoding can be temporarily
        suspended via a line from the cartridge connector.

        Of course one could make use of the video display to simulate the
        led's and switches for I/O but it would still not be as versatile as a
        wire-wrap Elf (without making hardware modifications to the Studio II
        itself).

        al
        ....



        --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "erd_6502" <erd_6502@y...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "wa9hsl" <wa9hsl@a...> wrote:
        > >
        > > The first TA10171V1 chips that I saw came from RCA Studio II
        > > video games. I have two of the chips that were removed from
        > > the Studio II games but sorry, they aren't for sale. I
        > > really wish I had one of the old Studio II games back along with
        > > some catridges but that's hind-sight for you!
        >
        > I have the Studio II (free from a friend), and a few carts ($5 each
        > at the Dayton Hamfest)... what I wish I had is the fabled
        > instructions I've heard about to build a "computer cartridge" that
        > is supposed to turn the Studio II into an Elf-like computer. I don't
        > know much about it, but would love to see the plans.
        >
        > -ethan
      • Lee Hart
        ... But, it could certainly emulate the RCA VIP. It used its 1861 video and hex keypad to display hex addresses and data, examine and change memory, run
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 2, 2004
          Alfred R. Winfrey wrote:
          > One shortfall with using the Studio II as an Elf might be the
          > limited pinouts available on the cartridge connector...
          > Of course, one could make use of the video display to simulate
          > the LEDs and switches for I/O but it would still not be as
          > versatile as a wire-wrap Elf

          But, it could certainly emulate the RCA VIP. It used its 1861 video and
          hex keypad to display hex addresses and data, examine and change memory,
          run programs, etc. It's actually easier to use for this than the ELF.

          For I/O, I suppose the way to do it is to memory-map a few memory
          locations, and use them as your I/O ports. This way, you won't need
          access to any lines not already routed to the cartridge connector.
          --
          "Never doubt that the work of a small group of thoughtful, committed
          citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever
          has!" -- Margaret Mead
          --
          Lee A. Hart 814 8th Ave N Sartell MN 56377 leeahart_at_earthlink.net
        • crenshrd
          ... games ... while ... limited ... signals ... temporarily ... as a ... II ... each ... don t ... Ethan You might take a look at this site for Studio II
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 3, 2004
            --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "Alfred R. Winfrey" <wa9hsl@a...>
            wrote:
            >
            >
            > Hi Ethan!
            >
            > The simple games on the Studio II were fun even though the Atari
            games
            > of that time period were more elaborate and had better resolution.
            > There were rumors about an Elf simulation on the Studio II for a
            while
            > but I never saw an actual writeup.
            >
            > One short fall with using the Studio II as an Elf might be the
            limited
            > pinouts available on the cartridge connector. For example, it's
            > unclear to me if they brought out the N lines and other timing
            signals
            > and whether or not the Studio II internal decoding can be
            temporarily
            > suspended via a line from the cartridge connector.
            >
            > Of course one could make use of the video display to simulate the
            > led's and switches for I/O but it would still not be as versatile
            as a
            > wire-wrap Elf (without making hardware modifications to the Studio
            II
            > itself).
            >
            > al
            > ....
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "erd_6502" <erd_6502@y...> wrote:
            > >
            > > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "wa9hsl" <wa9hsl@a...> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > The first TA10171V1 chips that I saw came from RCA Studio II
            > > > video games. I have two of the chips that were removed from
            > > > the Studio II games but sorry, they aren't for sale. I
            > > > really wish I had one of the old Studio II games back along with
            > > > some catridges but that's hind-sight for you!
            > >
            > > I have the Studio II (free from a friend), and a few carts ($5
            each
            > > at the Dayton Hamfest)... what I wish I had is the fabled
            > > instructions I've heard about to build a "computer cartridge" that
            > > is supposed to turn the Studio II into an Elf-like computer. I
            don't
            > > know much about it, but would love to see the plans.
            > >
            > > -ethan

            Ethan

            You might take a look at this site for Studio II cartridge info and
            other goodies.

            Rick
          • erd_6502
            ... Rick, I didn t detect a URL in your posting... what Studio II site? -ethan
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 4, 2004
              --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "crenshrd" <crenshaw@m...> wrote:
              > You might take a look at this site for Studio II cartridge info and
              > other goodies.

              Rick,

              I didn't detect a URL in your posting... what Studio II site?

              -ethan
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